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29 Jul 2014

P1010049-600x450

µVolume USB volume control project by Rupert Hirst of RunAwayBrainz:

µVolume T-32 USB Volume Control update, featuring infra red media control

Features:
-Arduino Compatible (Atmel Atmega32u4)
-Manual volume adjustment using the rotary encoder
-(IR) Infra red remote control of volume and multimedia controls
-Apple remote or user defined
-Visual and audible Feedback
-RGB Lighting Customization’s

[via]

uVolume T-32 USB volume & media control - [Link]

17 Jul 2014

raspiado

by elektor.com

When you start hooking peripherals such as keyboard, WiFi dongle and mouse to a Raspberry Pi it’s not long before you run out of ports and need a USB hub, preferably powered so that it can supply the RPi as well. At this point cabling starts to take over your workspace.

The Raspiado board, launched on Kickstarter should help cut down on the tangle; it has the same dimensions as the RPi board and mounts on its underside via two (stackable) standoff pillars to leave the top GPIO and camera connectors open to whatever you’re building so that it won’t impede the RPi’s connectivity options.

Raspberry Pi without the Spaghetti - [Link]

10 Jul 2014

obr1554_1

There´s only one original, even though with a fake, it´s possible to “gain” also something unwanted – hours of debugging and costs for exchange.

Copying of products and components is perhaps as old as an industrial production is. Logically – it´s easier to jump up to a “running train” (to copy a renowned product) than to develop something new. Everyone, who develops an electronic device probably can confirm, that it´s demanding and expensive. Similarly it´s also at development of chips. Well known and widely used chips for a USB interface . from company FTDI belong to the most popular on the market. No wonder, that it´s fakes appeared on the market, with the same appearance as an original (on the first sight). Despite the fact, that the price of the FT232RL chip is relatively very affordable, a vision of a cheaper purchase was certainly attractive though expensively paid at the end.

On the enclosed photo, there´s an original on the left side and the fake on the right side. It´s visible, that the original has a laser engraved marking, while the fake has it only printed. But that wouldn´t be a problem… Fake worked so-so well until the time, when FTDI upgraded drivers with a utility able to detect fake products. In case of fake, the USB communication fails (sends only zeroes).

On the enclosed photo, there´s an original on the left side and the fake on the right side. It´s visible, that the original has a laser engraved marking, while the fake has it only printed. But that wouldn´t be a problem… Fake worked so-so well until the time, when FTDI upgraded drivers with a utility able to detect fake products. In case of fake, the USB communication fails (sends only zeroes).

The result is clear in this case – exchange of non-working fakes from target devices (from customers! is significantly more expensive that a usage of an original would be. And how to be certain about the authenticity of the component? – by a purchase from an authorized distributor. SOS electronic is already for many years an authorized distributor of FTDI with a close cooperation and an above-standard technical support.

Be aware of the FTDI chips fakes - [Link]

9 Jul 2014

oled_case

Jared Sanson @ jared.geek.nz writes:

So it’s been a while since I last posted about my OLED watch, and I’ve done a lot of work on it! (And also broke it multiple times)

It’s taken me a lot of work to get this far, and I developed EVERYTHING from the ground up. The electronics design, the PCB layout, the RTOS and firmware drivers, the graphics engine, the user-mode app code, and even USB communications apps. I’ve used C, C#, and Python extensively in this project, and Altium Designer for the schematic and PCB.

Overall it has been an awesome learning experience, and if I was to make another one I would do a lot of things differently!

OLED Watch Is Alive! - [Link]


5 Jul 2014

F5KSWEYHX42R7K7.MEDIUM

Solderdoodle is a portable, cordless, USB rechargeable soldering iron. Solarcycle @ instructables.com writes:

After learning how to use 3D printers, one of my friends asked if there was such a thing as a USB soldering iron and I said that I had instructions to build one, but the battery was external. I then realized that I could create my own case design on a 3D printer and put the battery, charge controller, and other parts inside as one single unit! It worked! .stp files for the case are provided below.

Solderdoodle: Open Source USB Rechargeable Soldering Iron - [Link]

22 Jun 2014

RPi_USBTester_3

Posts Raspberry Pi power usage to Xively, MobileWill’s latest project:

Realtime graph of Raspberry Pi power usage on the web. So using Xiviely and my USB Tester I am logging voltage, current mWh and mAh to the web.

[via]

Live Raspberry Pi Power Usage - [Link]

17 Jun 2014

complete-600x448

Brian Dorey made this DIY USB to RS485 adapter, that is available at Github:

We looked for a full-duplex ready-made adapter but all the ones we found are only half duplex devices and as we needed to be able to supply 12 volts via the RJ45 connectors on the slave boards we decided to make our own USB to RS485 full duplex adapter using a USB converter chip from FTDI.
The board uses an FT230X with an RS485 converter chip which outputs to a set of header pins and also an RJ45 socket.
The new adapter board can supply power to the slave devices through the USB port or can be powered from an external supply by removing a power selector jumper. The board also has an on board 120R terminator resistor with selection jumper and LED’s to show serial activity.

[via]

USB to RS485 adapter - [Link]

14 Jun 2014

Cypress2

by elektor.com:

Cypress Semiconductor are offering the CY8CKIT-049-41XX development board which contains a 32-bit CORTEX-M3 48 MHz ARM processor for just $4.00 (£2.62 in the UK). The board is quite basic but offers a full-speed USB to serial bridge controller chip on a snap-off portion of the PCB to allow for bootloading the target PSoC device and communication with the board via a computer’s USB port. Software tools for the kit include the PSoC Creator and EZ-USB Software Development Kit (SDK).

The kit supports either a 3.3 or 5 V supply voltage and the device can be programmed using the bootloader or the Cypress MiniProg3 programmer. Cypress Semiconductor are marketing these ready-to-run kits as an alternative to supplying device samples.

Low-cost ARM Development Platform - [Link]

11 Jun 2014

Portable_USB_Charger_Teardown_7998-500x436

Alan Parekh @ hackedgadgets.com writes:

This video was going to be a repair of this Portable USB Charger but as it turns out there wasn’t anything electrically wrong with it. It didn’t work out of the box but I think that must have been caused by some oxidation on the USB contacts. It seems to work like a champ now. The control chip for the DC/DC converter looks to be this DHMF chip. I have never seen the swoop logo before and can’t seem to find any data on this 5 pin device though. It is probably similar to the LT1302 (PDF) that the Adafruit MintyBoost uses. The efficiency of this circuit doesn’t appear to be as efficient as a proper one built using the LT1302 though since when drawing 500mA from the output it can maintain very close to 5 volts out (2.5 watts) but needs an input of 3 volt at 1.3 amps to do it (3.9 watts). This gives us an efficiency of about 64%, the graph from the datasheet of the LT1302 indicates that it could perform at about 86% under these conditions.

Portable USB Charger Teardown - [Link]

10 Jun 2014

Add a video monitor to your arduino via serial !! You can use it as your prefered output or as a secondary screen for the results of your sketch.

All you send through the serial will be printed out on your TV screen. (You can use an old TV).

On Arduino, you must connect TX from arduino to RX (blue borne) of this my rig adapter. Or on a PC, you can connect direct via USB cable.

Add a video monitor to your Arduino using USB Serial TTL to RCA TV input - [Link]

 



 
 
 

 

 

 

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