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22 Apr 2014
Implementing full-speed USB on NXP LPC microcontrollers

Implementing full-speed USB on NXP LPC microcontrollers

Are you encountering any issues with developing a full-speed USB application on NXP’s LPC microcontrollers? This application note from NXP highlights some of the important issues that you need to be aware of for a typical full-speed USB application. [via]

Implementing full-speed USB on NXP’s LPC microcontrollers - [Link]

20 Apr 2014

obr1510_p391

RFID keyboard emulators are able to significantly simplify tracking of goods.

“Replacemen” of a keyboard in a form of an RFID module connected to a USB port works very simply – UID of every tag, which will appear in its range will send to a computer – the same way as if we typed it in by a keyboard. SL040A also enables to choose, whether we want the reader to send only data, or also a „CR“ character after every UID (as if an Enter key was hit). It means, that if we already have a software to type in open (for example Excel), the reader itself will fill the cell with data and move the cursor to another cell. SL040A is even able to read data (not only UID) from Mifare tags.

SL040A is also interesting by one feature – on a request from our company SOS Electronic, the producer started to produce also the black version SL040A black.
Detailed information will provide you the SL040A user manual.

SL040A will load it to you directly into a table sheet - [Link]

4 Apr 2014

charger

cpldcpu did a teardown of an external USB battery:

The device has a USB micro-b socket which is used as 5V input for charging, and a normal USB-A socket as 5V output. The output power can be turned off and on by a toggle button. There are LEDs to indicate active power out (blue) and charging (red) states. The pictures above show the innards of the device. Most space is taken up by an ICR18650 LiIon battery, which are relatively common devices with 2600mAH. In addition, there is a tiny tiny PCB. The rear side of the PCB is dominated by a 4.7µH inductor, which is part of the boost converter to convert the 3.7V of the battery to the 5V USB output.

[via]

Tear down of a cheap external USB battery - [Link]

26 Mar 2014

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A purely software based USB peripheral for ARM Cortex M0+ devices. This software enables Cortex M0+ devices to act as Low speed USB device. It includes a lightweight USB & HID Stack and easily be optimized to consume only 4KB of flash.

LemcUSB: software USB for EFM32ZG (ARM Cortex M0+) - [Link]


25 Mar 2014

2014-03-15-06-33-43-300x295

TomKeddie shared his USB Isolator in dangerousprototypes’s project log forum:

This is a nice simple soldering project that does exactly that, isolates your USB port from connected devices. There are two input usb connectors, one carries data and power from the computer the other supplies power to the output. The output comes from a 3rd USB A connector. There is no power/ground/data connection between the computer and connected devices other than through the isolator chip. This board has two grounds, two power supplies etc.

[via]

Simple USB Isolator - [Link]

17 Mar 2014

unex-500x500

An incredibly small board at your fingertip: raising funds on Indiegogo!

A 100% Arduino IDE compatible, 32KB USB development board small enough to fit on your fingertips and cheap enough to leave in any project.

Having used several development boards over the years we soon realized that most of them are designed to be used for a single purpose. Having hacked some to increase functionality, we reasoned that not all boards would easily allow this and soon realized the need for boards which are feature rich, cost effective, yet easy to use and deploy in numerous applications. We set out to design such boards and this is where it has led us, our first pit-stop: The µ-nex.

The u-nex is a very compact Arduino compatible board designed around the Atmega328p micro-controller. It features 32KB of flash memory with ALL the micro-controller pins being brought out to enable you to build just about anything you would want to build with an 8-bit micro-controller from autonomous flying vehicles to LED cubes. Designed from the ground up to give you maximum possible versatility.

U-nex – a Arduino compatible, 32KB USB development board for $9, on Indiegogo - [Link]

15 Mar 2014

20140312_205005-600x337

Frank Zhao shared his simple 6x USB charger with current monitor in the dangerousprototypes.com project log forum:

This is a simple 6 port USB device charger with a individual current monitor on each port. The charging current is indicated using RGB LEDs. Blue means slow charge (under 250mA), green means 250mA to 750mA, red means over 750mA, and purple means over 1500mA (for tablets). This circuit involves an ATmega328P (if you do hobby electronics, I bet you have plenty spares of these), INA169 (check out this breakout board), and a OKR-T10-W12.

Simple 6x USB charger with current monitor - [Link]

28 Feb 2014

antiAFK

scasagrande shared his project antiAFK in the dangerousprototypes project log forum:

The antiAFK is essentially a stripped down Arduino Leonardo with the intention of sending occasional keyboard commands to the attached PC with the intention of preventing the user from being logged out of online games due to inactivity. This can help on high population servers where being kicked back to the login queue can mean that you miss a group event. It randomizes the time between presses (with a min and max), the key from a set of valid keys, and the duration of the key press event. The period, variance, and valid key set are configurable by the user through the CDC serial port.

[via]

antiAFK – Sending random keyboard commands - [Link]

30 Jan 2014

Pratham PIC32 PIC32MX795F512H Breakout Board development board usb host bootloader

Pratham: Breadboardable PIC32 Breakout/Development Board With USB OTG , USB/SDCard/UART Bootloader. Gaurav Chaudhary writes:

Doing random projects with Microcontroller i always come into position when i need to have a bit more power and Peripherals then regular 8-bit micro or Arduino has to offer, but most of the powerful micro usually come in non-DIY Friendly SMD package or else they have very less pins like DIP-28.

Do what i was need is a fairly small breakout board kind of things which should be easy to handle and should contain few necessary peripherals like bunch of LED ,few switches , USB , EEPROM , VReference for ADC ,Oscillator and Voltage regulators too. and the board also need to be low cost so that i can leave in that in the application as it is. and most important things is the board should be breadboard compatible.
so here is the solution with all of the features i can think off.

Pratham: Breadboardable PIC32 Breakout/Development Board - [Link]

20 Jan 2014

Dave takes a look at two cheap USB microscopes to see how suitable they are for electronics works and soldering and inspection.

EEVblog #566 – Cheap USB Microscope Reviews - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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