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17 Sep 2011

This is really neat, so many DIY AMBIlight clones for people who already have a TV. Would be neat to take the PC out of the picture. Are there any NTSC/PAL decoding solutions out there (that dont require an FPGA)? You could do some super-basic color analysis that way… [via]

The software analyses the image on your monitor and transfers its data by USB to the Ligthpack board. This board lights the surface behind a monitor, TV or laptop by means of RGB LEDs of the corresponded colors. The effect reminds the illumination of Phillips Ambilight TVs most of all.

light-pack – USB content-driving ambient lighting system – [Link]

17 Sep 2011

Brian writes – [via]

Power’s out due to tropical storm Irene, but there’s still sunlight out. So, I’m using a solar panel, an Adafruit adjustable breadboard power supply, and a USB hub to power my Sprint Overdrive.

Solar Powered Mobile Hotspot – [Link]

16 Sep 2011

The folks at opengadgets have created a little project called the “Talking Breathalyzer”: [via]

A customizable Breathalyzer that talks and tells you how much you’ve had to drink. It’s also open source and can easily be modified with your own text on the LCD screen and audio MP3 files.

When tethered to a PC with a USB cable, it has additional features including character animations, Breathalyzer Tweets, text to speech, weather and stock read-outs, and a Photobooth feature.

This website contains instructions on how to build the Talking Breathalyzer yourself. A pre-assembled Talking Breathalyzer will also be available by mid Septemeber 2011 from Seeedstudio. The Talking Breathalyzer is not a professional Breathalyzer and should be used for Amusement Purposes Only.

You can check out the schematic here, and download the source here.

The Talking Breathalyzer – [Link]

11 Sep 2011

Saelig Company, Inc. announces the MV200UM a new 2.megapixel USB digital microscope for capturing high quality magnified images and video for display on a PC using a simple USB 2.0 PC connection. The USB-powered MV200UM contains a built-in white LED illumination ring for viewing circuit boards, tiny components and markings, examining traces and solder joints on printed circuit boards, or for detailed product examination and record-taking, inspection, and quality control purposes.

Simple plug and play operation with the included software allows objects to be magnified using MV200UMʼs full-color 2 megapixel sensor on any Windows PC.  Two interchangeable clear ring-stands of different heights allow precise separation from objects, providing up to 200x magnification on a 17” monitor with the MV200Mʼs 1,280 x 1,024 pixels.  The microscope can also be handheld at distances of 8mm to 200mm for inspecting parts at lower magnification.  Fields of view can be as small as 1.9mm x 1.5mm, or as large as 82mm x 65mm. Moving images can be displayed at 30fps in VGA resolution via the USB 2.0 interface too.  The free software included allows snapshots, video recording, taking time-lapsed pictures, and making calibrated measurements. Read the rest of this entry »


4 Sep 2011

pocketBot – line follower from OStan on Vimeo.

PocketBot – a matchbox-sized line following robot – [via]

PocketBot project consists of three parts. The key part of the project is the robot itself – a tiny line following vehicle of a matchbox size. Furthermore, the robot is supported with an USB communication device and with a PC control application. Altogether, these three parts form a complex solution to the line following issue.

The robot was primary designed to fit into a matchbox. A homemade double-sided printed circuit board stands as the robot’s chassis at the same time. Robot is powered with two rechargeable lithium-ion button batteries wired in parallel (3.6V, 40mAh each). The Atmel ATmega8 microcontroller runs robot’s program, which is written in C. An 8-pin connector offers ISP and UART interface for programming and debugging, respectively.

PocketBot – a matchbox-sized line following robot – [Link]

31 Aug 2011

The idea of this project is to control (switch off/on) two power sockets with a computer by using its USB port. I’ve chosen USB in first place because I wanted to experiment with the PIC18F4550 microchip’s microcontroller, and secondly because the power supplied by this port (500mA) is enough to activate a relay without any additional power supply.

USocket – USB controlled Socket with PIC18F4550 – [Link]

28 Aug 2011

www.adafruit.com writes:

This is an interesting native-USB hack. An atmel (1287?) with a microsd slot that ‘looks’ like an optical disk drive to allow booting. We think someone could probably hack this together using an our Atmega32u4 breakout board or Teensy, MicroSD breakout board, and a heavy dose of LUFA.

The Isostick – Optical drive in a usb stick – [Link]

24 Aug 2011

jethomson.wordpress.com writes:

Here’s an article I wrote about reusing a cheap ($6) USBasp programmer for another project by flashing new code on to it. It’s a decent alternative to a more expensive USB dev board if you have a simple project that doesn’t require any pins or you can make do with the four SPI pins. The article discusses how to download new code using an external programmer or USBaspLoader. It also explains how to make it work with the Arduino IDE. At the end are a couple of evil demo programs showing how to use it as a USB HID keyboard.

Reflashing a betemcu USBasp Programmer – [Link]

22 Aug 2011

This is a simple power meter to analyze (with LabVIEW) the current consuming in a house using the led indicator of a house energy meter. Reading the red led of a home energy counters the system detects the correct consumption in a house. It is a noninvasive method, not cut wire, no current disconnects, so a very interesting method…

The system consists of two parts: the Arduino board that detects the led pulses and sends the data via the XBee module, and a PC that receive the data through a USB/Xbee module and processes the data with LabVIEW so you can prepare and study the consumption in a very instant. Arduino sends two data to the PC: 1 – Real time datas 2 – Average consumption measured in a time of 5 minutes.

Real-Time Energy Monitor with Arduino and LabVIEW – [Link]

16 Aug 2011

XBMC is a cross platform Media Center Application with 10-foot UI. In this project we develop USB port base controller for XBMC application. Main functionality of this controller unit is to provide remote control interface, LCD base player information panel and rotary encoder base controller for XBMC. With this given hardware design and software programs, user may be able to control XBMC without using standard input devices such as keyboard and mouse.

This device is design to work with XBMC Version 10.1 (codename Dharma) or newer versions. Older version of XBMC may not work this system because of the differences in its Web Control Interface. This system is design to work with XBMC – JSON RPC interface.

XBMC USB Controller – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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