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27 May 2015

FFFVCV4IA5IT9QT.MEDIUM

by Dimitris Platis @ instructables.com:

During presentations, I avoid being stationary and generally like to walk around in order to increase the interaction between me and the audience. However, I am constantly being faced with the burden of having to go back to the laptop, in order to change a slide or tell a person sitting by the laptop to do that. Not cool!

This problem is usually solved by devices, called remote clickers or wireless presenters, which consist of a handheld controller with buttons that sends signals to a USB dongle plugged in the computer. After looking around to buy one, I could not find any decent option costing less than 10$. So why not make one?

Simple, easy and cheap wireless presenter – [Link]

23 May 2015

FDVH1IXI9YBYAL5.MEDIUM

by indigod0g @ instructables.com:

In this project, we will be making a mini weather station that measures temperature and humidity and transmits them wirelessly to a ground station, which displays the readings on an LCD display!

It’s a fairly easy project and can be used either on its own or part of something bigger.

Mini weather station – [Link]

12 Feb 2015

15721754859_1301df94c1_o-e1417497266426

by Tim @ timleland.com:

Have you ever wanted to wirelessly control power outlets from your phone? You could buy a Belkin WeMo Switch for over $40 for 1 outlet or build your own with 5 outlets for under $35 if you already own a Raspberry Pi. Hopefully this post will guide you in the right direction.

Wireless Power Outlets RF from Raspberry Pi – [Link]

8 Jan 2015

HEF4046BT

Infrared headphones can be used for listening to music or television cordlessly. The headphones utilize a transmitter that connects with audio cables to the audio source, such as a home entertainment center. The transmitter utilizes light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to direct a focused beam of invisible pulsating light towards a receiver built into the headphone set. The pulsations act as ON/OFF signals that are translated digitally by the receiver into audible sound waves. Most infrared headphones have an effective range of about 30 feet (~10 meters) or less, and require a clear line of sight between transmitter and receiver.

Sound comes out of the stereo system through audio cables and into an infrared transmitter. The transmitter turns the sound into a series of pulses. The pulses work like bits in a computer, digitally capturing the sound information. These pulses are then sent to an infrared LED.

For the transmitter side, an audio input from PL1 frequency modulates the VCO section of a HEF4046BT PLL chip. The VCO output drives Q1, a switching transistor. Q1 drives two IR LEDs. The signal produced is around 100 kHz, FM carrier VCO sensitivity is around 7.5 kHz/V.

Wireless IR Headphone Transmitter – [Link]


20 Nov 2014

IMG_1791-splash

 

Wireless. Easier. Safer. Longer Lasting Christmas lights. by Chris Higgins & Hardeep Johar:

The first ever wirelessly powered Christmas lights
Smartphone controlled energy efficient LED lights
Outshines any of the average Christmas lights by 20 years

AURA: The first ever, wirelessly powered Christmas lights – [Link]

9 Nov 2014

LiFiFrauenhofer

by elektor.com:

Representatives from the Fraunhofer Institute for Photonic Microsystems IPMS in Dresden will be showing off their Li-Fi wireless communication system at the upcoming electronica exhibition held in Munich from November 11 to 14. The system uses infra-red light as the transmission medium and can transfer data at a speed of up to 1 Gigabit per second over a distance of up to 10 meters.

Li-Fi Goes Live at electronica – [Link]

5 Nov 2014

rcj_wireless_world-record_40Gbps.jpg-(1)

LTE beat by 40X by a new protocol described this week at the Compound Semiconductor Integrated Circuits Symposium in San Diego. Next their aim is wireless 100 Gbit WLAN: R. Colin Johnson @NextGenLog

World’s Wireless Record Breaks 40 Gbit/s – [Link]

5 Nov 2014

HEF4046BP

Infrared headphones can be used for listening to music or television cordlessly. The headphones utilize a transmitter that connects with audio cables to the audio source, such as a home entertainment center. The transmitter utilizes light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to direct a focused beam of invisible pulsating light towards a receiver built into the headphone set. The pulsations act as ON/OFF signals that are translated digitally by the receiver into audible sound waves. Most infrared headphones have an effective range of about 30 feet (~10 meters) or less, and require a clear line of sight between transmitter and receiver.

The headphones pick up the light with a receiver and turn it back into sound. The receiver has an infrared CDS cell, which produces a pulse of electricity every time infrared light lands on it. The cell is designed to pick up the particular frequency of light produced by the transmitter, so it is not disturbed or thrown off by other light. A small computer inside of the receiver takes these pulses of electricity and turns them into an audio signal. This audio signal is then amplified and sent to the headphones themselves, which play the sound.

For the receiver side, a photodiode D1 feeds high gain IR remote control preamp IC, a CA3237E. U2 is a PLL FM detector tuned to around 100 kHz. The detector output is amplified by U3 and it can drive a speaker or a set of headphones.

Wireless IR Headphone Receiver – [Link]

27 Sep 2014

Record attendance and development sets for great prices. Webinar with IQRF about wireless solutions was also about this.

This time, we again realized two webinars during just one day – one in English and one in Czech language.Usually, we draw one winner of development set out of all webinar participants. However this time, all participants had a chance to get DS-START-03 development set for fantastic price.

Did you miss our webinar?

If you missed this webinar, you can check VIDEO-record…


SOS webinar – How can you make a wireless device from your product? It‘s simple! – [Link]

23 Sep 2014

example__86477.1409204603.1280.1280by shop.ciseco.co.uk:

The Wireless Inventors Kit for the Raspberry Pi (RasWIK) is an exciting and affordable addition to the Raspberry Pi. RasWIK demonstrates that with our leading edge technology anyone (and we mean anyone) can build wireless sensors and actuators , you do not need huge experience, a degree or even any tools. We show you even how to connect the devices you build to “the Internet of Things” (IoT) service providers such as Xively.

Getting started is just 5 simple steps:
1. Insert the preconfigured SD card to your Pi
2. Plug in the Slice of Radio to the GPIO connector
3. Turn on the Pi
4. Power the XinoRF development board
5. Lauch the Python based example application on your Pi
Thats it!……..you are now past step one of your journey to wireless nirvana :)

RasWIK – Raspberry Pi Wireless Inventors Kit – [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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