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20 Nov 2014

IMG_1791-splash

 

Wireless. Easier. Safer. Longer Lasting Christmas lights. by Chris Higgins & Hardeep Johar:

The first ever wirelessly powered Christmas lights
Smartphone controlled energy efficient LED lights
Outshines any of the average Christmas lights by 20 years

AURA: The first ever, wirelessly powered Christmas lights - [Link]

9 Nov 2014

LiFiFrauenhofer

by elektor.com:

Representatives from the Fraunhofer Institute for Photonic Microsystems IPMS in Dresden will be showing off their Li-Fi wireless communication system at the upcoming electronica exhibition held in Munich from November 11 to 14. The system uses infra-red light as the transmission medium and can transfer data at a speed of up to 1 Gigabit per second over a distance of up to 10 meters.

Li-Fi Goes Live at electronica - [Link]

5 Nov 2014

rcj_wireless_world-record_40Gbps.jpg-(1)

LTE beat by 40X by a new protocol described this week at the Compound Semiconductor Integrated Circuits Symposium in San Diego. Next their aim is wireless 100 Gbit WLAN: R. Colin Johnson @NextGenLog

World’s Wireless Record Breaks 40 Gbit/s - [Link]

5 Nov 2014

HEF4046BP

Infrared headphones can be used for listening to music or television cordlessly. The headphones utilize a transmitter that connects with audio cables to the audio source, such as a home entertainment center. The transmitter utilizes light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to direct a focused beam of invisible pulsating light towards a receiver built into the headphone set. The pulsations act as ON/OFF signals that are translated digitally by the receiver into audible sound waves. Most infrared headphones have an effective range of about 30 feet (~10 meters) or less, and require a clear line of sight between transmitter and receiver.

The headphones pick up the light with a receiver and turn it back into sound. The receiver has an infrared CDS cell, which produces a pulse of electricity every time infrared light lands on it. The cell is designed to pick up the particular frequency of light produced by the transmitter, so it is not disturbed or thrown off by other light. A small computer inside of the receiver takes these pulses of electricity and turns them into an audio signal. This audio signal is then amplified and sent to the headphones themselves, which play the sound.

For the receiver side, a photodiode D1 feeds high gain IR remote control preamp IC, a CA3237E. U2 is a PLL FM detector tuned to around 100 kHz. The detector output is amplified by U3 and it can drive a speaker or a set of headphones.

Wireless IR Headphone Receiver - [Link]


27 Sep 2014

Record attendance and development sets for great prices. Webinar with IQRF about wireless solutions was also about this.

This time, we again realized two webinars during just one day – one in English and one in Czech language.Usually, we draw one winner of development set out of all webinar participants. However this time, all participants had a chance to get DS-START-03 development set for fantastic price.

Did you miss our webinar?

If you missed this webinar, you can check VIDEO-record…


SOS webinar – How can you make a wireless device from your product? It‘s simple! - [Link]

23 Sep 2014

example__86477.1409204603.1280.1280by shop.ciseco.co.uk:

The Wireless Inventors Kit for the Raspberry Pi (RasWIK) is an exciting and affordable addition to the Raspberry Pi. RasWIK demonstrates that with our leading edge technology anyone (and we mean anyone) can build wireless sensors and actuators , you do not need huge experience, a degree or even any tools. We show you even how to connect the devices you build to “the Internet of Things” (IoT) service providers such as Xively.

Getting started is just 5 simple steps:
1. Insert the preconfigured SD card to your Pi
2. Plug in the Slice of Radio to the GPIO connector
3. Turn on the Pi
4. Power the XinoRF development board
5. Lauch the Python based example application on your Pi
Thats it!……..you are now past step one of your journey to wireless nirvana :)

RasWIK – Raspberry Pi Wireless Inventors Kit - [Link]

1 Aug 2014

mysensors]

Learn how to create your own low cost wireless sensors and connect them to the world.

Store your sensor data at home or in our cloud. We provide fancy graphs and other great online tools to help you manage and analyze your sensor data!

mysensors.org – Learn how to create your own low cost wireless sensors - [Link]

 

28 Jul 2014

idtp9026

by elektor.com:

Integrated Device Technology has released what is said to be the world’s smallest 2W contactless-charging power receiver chip. In the future when all our internet-connected portable and wearable devices need a recharge after a busy day with their head in the cloud, contactless charging will be the way to go. The IDTP9026 wireless-charging receiver chip has a board footprint of just 30 square millimetres and is designed to charge a standard lithium-ion battery rated at 4.2 V. An AD pin allows the device to be switched out of the charging circuit when an external adapter is used for recharging. A separate enable pin is also available to turn the device off.

Receiver Chip for Wireless-Charging - [Link]

26 May 2014

planfamille-1024x682

by bitsofmymind.com:

To my computer, its simply a USB keyboard, nothing less, but to me its a remote I can use on any platform with no line of sight. I decided to name it the keyMote. Sounds a bit odd to my ears but its a fitting name.

Here is how it works. There are two parts to this system, the remote, which is battery powered, and the base, which is hooked up to a computer. The remote is a simple keypad (In the case of the prototype, its a numeric keypad, but really, it could be any interface) with a transmitter hooked up to it. The base, the other end, is a receiver with USB Human interface device functionality, in other words, a vanilla USB keyboard. When a button is pressed, the remote sends the identifier of that button to the base which then looks up in a table the keystrokes this identifier is mapped to and sends those to the computer via USB. What button is mapped to what keystroke is entirely configurable using a serial terminal interface (shell) to the base. It can be anything, Ctrl-C, Alt-Shift-F, PageUp, etc. Getting it to interface with your program is then simply a matter of configuring keyboard shortcuts.

keyMote: a simple wireless remote for computers - [Link]

21 May 2014

Stanford researchers, lead by electrical engineer Ada Poon, are working on midfield wireless power for medical implants, ranging in application from nerve stimulation to medication delivery. [via]

Midfield Wireless Power for Implants - [Link]



 
 
 

 

 

 

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