Home Blog  





23 Oct 2013

The Arduino compatible board to take your projects beyond your home and garden. Anywhere your imagination takes you.

Prototyping should be rapid. Putting projects together should be as easy as clicking together lego-like building blocks. SODAQ makes it so. SODAQ is a multi-feature microprocessor board that lets you connect sensors and devices to the internet, quickly and with no fuss. It’s designed for connecting things efficiently, running off-grid with built-in, ready-to-go solar power:

Getting data off a device is only half the story – it needs to go somewhere. We designed the SODAQ system to be able to communicate from anywhere, with a GPRS module and all the control code for it included from the start.

It takes the Arduino prototyping concept, makes it simpler, and extends it. No breadboarding or soldering required, but with plenty of memory, sockets, solar panel and battery control, and extra features, all on one board.

The board has built in sockets for Grove modules; a realtime clock; extended flash memory; USB on-board; and the Bee socket can take any WiFi/RF/XBee or other compatible plugin for communications instead of our GPRS module.

SODAQ: a lego-like, plug-in, rapid prototyping board - [Link]

11 Oct 2013

GPS-to-Xbee-Bridge-600x392

ezflyr posted his new project, the GPS to Xbee Bridge:

Here is my latest project, a ‘GPS to Xbee Bridge’. This project utilizes a USGlobalsat BR-355 GPS receiver, and an Xbee module to wirelessly transmit a GPS-derived time/date info packet to a variety of home-brew clocks around my home! These clocks consist of an odd mix of Nixie Tube clocks and GLCD clocks that I’ve design and built over the years! The design is based on a PIC 18F14K22 processor which receives and parses incoming NMEA data from the BR-355 GPS module, and an Xbee or Xbee Pro wireless module. These packets are transmitted every 15 seconds!

[via]

‘GPS to Xbee bridge’ project - [Link]

17 Jul 2013

Arduino quadcopter iPhone control:

This Arduino Quadcopter by Kyle Fieldus has iPhone Control, similar to the AR Drone you can tilt the phone to control the quadcopter. Touch OSC is being used to design the phone interface, there is also an Android version available. The system chain is a bit complex since the phone is sending the input data to the computer, the computer determines what should be done on the quadcopter and sends these commands to a computer tethered Arduino via USB. The computer tethered Arduino finally sends the commands to the quadcopter mounted Arduino via Xbee. All of the code and instructions will be made available as soon as this University project has been handed in and graded. You can see the first video here that was taken when the Xbee link between the two Arduinos was tested.

Arduino quadcopter iPhone control - [Link]

26 Jun 2012

If you´re searching for an RF communication module with a long range, you´re on the right address. More precisely said – 40 km at line-of-sight outdoor, or 550m indoor.

XBee technology enables to transfer data from various sources, mainly in industry – for example data from various sensors, controlling of technology and similar. XBee-PRO 868 from DIGI International (Maxstream) uses SRD G3 868 MHz band (869,525 MHz) and has a software selectable output power in the 1 – 315mW range.

Relatively high maximum output power provides to the module a very long range. This enables to use it in applications with long distances between particular points. XBee_PRO can be connected to your application via a standard 3.3V CMOS UART with 1.2 to 230.4 Kbps data rate. Various XBee modules from Digi International feature common footprint, that´s why they´re mutually exchangeable this adaptable to your application requirements. XBee-PRO 868 features 128 bit AES encryption and a 64 bitovou adress (network ID). They are usable for Point-to-Multipoint/Star or also Peer-to-peer topologies. An advantage is also an easy use – no further configuration is necessary.

Available are multiple versions, type XBP08-DPSIT-024 has an RPSMA connector. Thanks to it, the module can be connected to various antennas.

Detailed information will provide you the XBP08-DPSIT-024 datasheet, overview of XBee-PRO 868 modules, as well as XBee/RF family comparison from company Digi International.

With XBee-PRO 868 you have 40 km within reach - [Link]


17 May 2012

Stephanie @ planetstephanie.net writes:

The red circle ‘red alert light’ is wired to the XBee’s RSSI so when the XBee receives a wireless command, the red light comes on for a few seconds.

The white gridded rectangle is the DHT22 sensor (temperature and humidity). I felt it would ‘blend in’ enough that it should be mounted right up front for all to see. The little black hole to the right of the DHT22 is for the light sensor.

Why is there a light sensor? Why not? Also: because I had an extra one laying around.

The screen display is mostly self-evident. Time, day, date. Heat/Cool. Run/Hold/Override. Target temp (small) and actual temp (large). Fan status (on/auto) and humidity.

Thermostat Three - [Link]

30 Mar 2012

A Wireless XBee Pan/Tilt Servo System For Cameras. It uses a pair of XBee modules to build a simple wireless interface which will be used with PIC 18LF4520′s to control a servo based pan and tilt system which can move my camera 45 degrees in any direction, left-right-forward-backwards.

Wireless XBee Pan/Tilt System - [Link]

24 Mar 2012

Ivan Sergeev writes:

The Wireless Power Meter is a simplistic ATmega88p and ZigBee/XBee based true V-I power meter. AC voltage measurement is made from the rectified signal of a step-down transformer, and current measurement is made with the pass-through Allegro ACS712 Hall-Effect sensor.

Wireless Power Meter - [Link]

23 Mar 2012

Ivan Sergeev writes:

This project was used as a wireless light dimmer, but in principle can be used to dim resistive loads and wirelessly turn on/off loads. The current code includes a routine to dim a light bulb in a “heartbeat” pattern, with the heartbeat frequency remotely adjustable.

The top left of the schematic shows the wall outlet (US 120VAC) being stepped down with a small transformer, then full rectified and regulated. This powers the entire board from the wall. The top right shows a microcontroller, ATmega48, its programming header, and a UART connection to the microcontroller (for debugging). The bottom right shows the XBee and its basic voltage regulation (it’s 3.3V), as well as an LED that indicates when the XBee is connected.

Wireless TRIAC dimmer - [Link]

24 Dec 2011

 

Chris @ PyroElectro.com writes:

Searching for a reliable wireless solution for your project can be a real pain if you’re not familiar with current wireless standards, data rates and reliability. The Xbee Modules that we will use in this article are widely available, use a very reliable wireless transmission protocol and have sufficient datarates for most hobby projects.

This article will show you how to build a basic wireless input and output system in the form of a single transmitter and single receiver. Communication will be one way to keep things simple with two xbee modules being used for the wireless link. In the end, a small trimpot will control the movement of a servo motor.

Xbee Wireless Servo Control - [Link]

4 Oct 2011

RF networking is getting huge these days. With new RF nodes being developed on what seems like a monthly schedule. This means new and established companies are getting in the game. I’m pretty sure that everybody knows of Digi international (manufacturers of Xbee RF nodes) and regard them to be the current King of RF networking, BUT with ninja-like progress companies like Synapse Wireless have snuck up on them and started offering superior products. Syanpse nodes have the ability to wirelessly program Arduino UNOs at distances of >250ft without hardware mods or painful configuration processes. The nodes are both a network module and user-programmable microcontroller in one and on top of that they have to ability to do self-healing mesh networking. Their specs seem to outdo xbees on many levels, which begs the question, Synapse Wireless where have you been all my life??? :)

There’s a New SheRifF in Town and Their Name is Synapse Wireless - [Link]

 



 
 
 

 

 

 

Search Site | Advertising | Contact Us
Elektrotekno.com | Free Schematics Search Engine | Electronic Kits