Home Blog  





17 Sep 2011

Light Switch XBee: Example Project by Rob Faludi. [via]

Just finished documenting the latest example project. The Light Switch XBee is a wireless wall switch that can control lamps, fans, motors or your homemade robot using Digi’s XBee radio. It’s a model for almost any digital input device you’d like to build. If it goes on and off, you can make it wireless using this example as your guide!

Full PDF here

Light Switch XBee: Example Project - [Link]

7 Sep 2011

Custom Controller V2. Patrick writes – [via]

Hello adafruit industries. My name is Patrick McCabe and I am a 17 year old senior in high school. I was on the second ”show and tell” of yours. I showed off my custom controller I made. I made it so I can provide input to my robots and get information returned. It contains a LCD, Xbee transceiver, custom LCD Arduino micro-controller backpack, 3 button inputs, a potentiometer, and a Wii Nunchuck circuit board with joystick. The buttons will allow navigation through the menu system and sending simple commands within the menu. The Wii Nunchuck will allow for manual control of a robot by using either the joystick or through tilting action read by the accelerometer. The potentiometer will allow variables like speed to be adjusted on a robot.

Custom Controller V2 - [Link]

25 Aug 2011

Digi Launches Wi-Fi Version of Popular XBee Module, we’re checking this out shortly! [via]

Digi International (NASDAQ: DGII) today introduced the XBee® Wi-Fi, an embedded module that enables industry leading low power, serial-to-Wi-Fi networking in the popular XBee form factor. Because of the XBee’s common footprint and application programming interface (API), customers can now create a single board design for wireless products that supports 802.15.4, ZigBee, ZigBee Smart Energy, 2.4 GHz, 900 and 868 MHz, Wi-Fi and proprietary DigiMesh protocols.

“XBee modules offer developers tremendous flexibility and are extremely easy to use,” said Larry Kraft, senior vice president of global sales and marketing, Digi International. “By adding a low-power Wi-Fi module to the XBee product family we give customers the fastest and most flexible way to get Wi-Fi up and running on their systems.”

Ideal for energy management, wireless sensor networks and intelligent asset management, the XBee Wi-Fi offers 802.11 b/g/n networking and flexible SPI and UART serial interfaces. Because the module includes the 802.11 b/g/n physical layer, baseband MAC and TCP/IP stack, developers can add Wi-Fi to their products simply by connecting to the XBee Wi-Fi’s serial port. The XBee Wi-Fi is fully tested at manufacture and comes with modular certification for the U.S., E.U., Canada and a number of other countries, further reducing the time to market, development expense and design complexity.

Digi Launches Wi-Fi Version of Popular XBee Module - [Link]

22 Aug 2011

This is a simple power meter to analyze (with LabVIEW) the current consuming in a house using the led indicator of a house energy meter. Reading the red led of a home energy counters the system detects the correct consumption in a house. It is a noninvasive method, not cut wire, no current disconnects, so a very interesting method…

The system consists of two parts: the Arduino board that detects the led pulses and sends the data via the XBee module, and a PC that receive the data through a USB/Xbee module and processes the data with LabVIEW so you can prepare and study the consumption in a very instant. Arduino sends two data to the PC: 1 – Real time datas 2 – Average consumption measured in a time of 5 minutes.

Real-Time Energy Monitor with Arduino and LabVIEW - [Link]


18 Jun 2011

Chris from PyroElectro has posted this tutorial on interfacing with XBee.

He writes:

Getting started with XBee can be tricky, even though it shouldn’t be. Here is a drop-dead simple guide to using XBee modules out of the box. The tutorial shows you how to build a wireless interface with XBee modules between two PIC 18LF4520 microcontrollers.

XBee wireless interface tutorial - [Link]

29 Apr 2011

adafruit.com writes: [via]

Converting an Arduino to 3.3V – All official Arduinos run on 5 volts, which for a long time was the ‘standard’ voltage for hobbyist electronics and microcontrollers. But now the coolest new sensors, displays and chips are 3.3V and are not 5V compatible. For example, XBee radios, and SD cards and acellerometers all run on 3.3V logic and power. If you tried to connect to them with 5V you could damage the internals of the accessory. We use chips like the CD4050 to do level conversion but if you are using a lot of 3.3V devices, maybe you’re just better off upgrading the entire Arduino to run from 3.3V! To do that, we will replace the regulator so that the DC barrel jack for a 3.3v type, and then reconfigure the 5V usb power line so it goes through the regulator as well.

Converting an Arduino to 3.3V – [Link]

12 Apr 2011

dangerousprototypes.com writes:

JeeLabs has a product known as the JeeNode v5, which is essentially a miniature Arduino (Atmega328p) board with an onboard RFM12B wireless module. Boards are available with the serial interface (shown above) as well as USB.

You can buy the kit directly from JeeLabs, or build your own using the schematic and documentation provided.

While it’s not an Xbee compatible RF unit, the RFM12B has its own RF12 library of functions which should help you accomplish many control and data transfer tasks.

JeeLabs JeeNode combines Arduino, RF – [Link]

4 Apr 2011

The present document shows step by step how to easily build an interesting pointing device: the wireless tilt mouse, that allows to control the mouse’s cursor on the PC screen through the tilt of the board itself. The analog data from a 3-D accelerometer and from two push-buttons are acquired, converted and radio transmitted by an XBee module using the standard ZigBee protocol.

XBee Accelerometer Demo – Wireless Tilt Mouse Application – [Link]

15 Mar 2011

carlitoscontraptions.com writes:

For the second Carlitos’ Project, I wanted to do something a bit more “useful” than pretty lights. So I decided that a speech controlled Arduino robot should be interesting enough as a project.

For this project, I used the DFRobotShop Rover (a mobile Arduino kit), the VRbot speech recognition module by Veear, two XBee modules, an Arduino Uno, two XBee shields and some other components. see the video below to learn how to do your own.

Speech-Controlled Arduino Robot – [Link]

24 Feb 2011

Logos Electromechanical LLC Announces the Zigduino, a Shield-Compatible Arduino Clone with Built-in Wireless

SEATTLE Wash. – Feb. 23, 2011 – Logos Electromechanical LLC announced the Zigduino, an Arduino-compatible microcontroller platform that integrates an 802.15.4 radio on the board.

The radio can be configured to support any 802.15.4-based protocol, including ZigBee, Route Under MAC/6LoWPAN, and RF4CE.

The Zigduino uses a reverse polarity SMA connector (RP-SMA) for an external antenna. This allows the user to use nearly any existing 2.4 GHz antenna with it. The Zigduino runs on 3.3V, but all I/O pins are 5V compatible. Read the rest of this entry »



 
 
 

 

 

 

Search Site | Advertising | Contact Us
Elektrotekno.com | Free Schematics Search Engine | Electronic Kits | Electronics Projects