Understanding Arduino UNO Hardware Design

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Yahya Tawil tipped us with his latest article that explains how Arduino works from an electronic design perspective.

Most articles explain the software of Arduinos. However, understanding hardware design helps you to make the next step in the Arduino journey. A good grasp of the electronic design of your Arduino hardware will help you learn how to embed an Arduino in the design of a final product, including what to keep and what to omit from your original design.

Understanding Arduino UNO Hardware Design – [Link]

What’s inside a microchip ?

In this video “DanTheAwesomeMan” takes us on a tour of the visible internal workings of a 27C512 EPROM microchip, with the aid of an optical microscope at up to 800x magnification.

What’s inside a microchip ? – [Link]

LTM8003 – 40VIN, 3.5A Step-Down μModule Regulator

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LTM8003 is a step-down DC/DC µModule (micro-module) regulator with a 40V input voltage rating (42V abs. Max.) and 3.5A of continuous (6A peak) output current. The LTM8003’s pinout is FMEA (failure mode effects analysis) compliant, so the output voltage stays at or below the regulation voltage in the event of short-circuit to GND, short-circuit to a neighbouring pin or if a pin is left floating.

The maximum junction temperature of the H-grade version is 150°C, for high temperature or high power automotive and industrial applications. The LTM8003 operates from an input voltage range of 3.4V to 40V and has an adjustable output voltage range of 0.97V to 18V. The switching frequency is adjustable via an external resistor or can be synchronized to an external clock from 200 kHz to 3 MHz. The LTM8003 has four operation modes: Burst Mode operation, pulse skip mode, pulse skip mode with spread spectrum and external synch mode. The quiescent current in Burst Mode operation is 25 µA (max), suiting the LTM8003 for battery operated systems, specifically “keep alive” systems.

LTM8003 – 40VIN, 3.5A Step-Down μModule Regulator – [Link]

Exploring the Transcend Wifi-SD card

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James O’Neill explores a Transcend SD that he believes it’s the smaller Linux server. It’s actually a 16GB memory card, an ARM processor and a WIFI chip all in an SD card package.

The way these cards works is different from the better known Eye-FI card. They are SERVERS : they don’t upload pictures to a service by themselves, instead they expect a client to come to them, discover the files they want and download them. The way we’re expected to do this is using HTTP , either from a web browser or from an App on a mobile device which acts as wrapper for the same HTTP requests.

Exploring the Transcend Wifi-SD card – [Link]

An Introduction to MSP430 Launchpad

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Rahul Sreedharan introduces us to TI’s MSP430 microcontroller using LaunchPad board.

In this tutorial we will be exploring the workings of a MSP430 based microcontroller from Texas Instruments. MSP430 is developed by Texas Instruments as an extremely low power 16 bit architecture for use in low power, low cost, energy constrained embedded applicationsThe Hardware used is the MSP430 Launchpad from TI which contains a programmer/Debugger + two microcontrollers making it an ideal platform to start learning about MSP430G2xxx controller.

An Introduction to MSP430 Launchpad – [Link]

ATtiny based bidirectional motor control using L293D

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Rahul @ Xanthium has posted a tutorial on interfacing ATtiny with L293D:

In this tutorial we will learn to interface L293D with ATMEL ATtiny microcontroller and control them bidirectionally.The microcontroller used here is ATtiny2313A which is interfaced to two L293D motor control chips for controlling upto 4 DC brushed motors.You can control upto 8 motors if bidirectional control is not needed.
The ability to control upto 4 motors is essential when we are building 4 wheel drive robotic projects like Rovers or under water ROV’s.

ATtiny based bidirectional motor control using L293D – [Link]

PIC Programmable Relay Switch

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Raj @ embedded-lab.com published a revised version of an old project, a programmable Relay Switch based on PIC16F1847 (or PIC16F628A) that can be used is various automation applications and you can independently set ON and OFF timer with maximum time interval 99 hours and 59 minutes.

Here are the summary of the features that this programmable relay switch has:

  • On-board +5V voltage regulator (operates at 9-15V DC input)
  • OFF and ON time setup for the relay operation
  • Option for cyclic run (maximum 100 cycles, after which the timer stops automatically)
  • Stores ON/OFF times and Cyclic option from previous setup into internal EEPROM
  • ON/OFF timing range: 0 to 99 hours and 59 minutes with 1 min resolution
  • Interactive user interface using 4 tact switches and a character LCD
  • On-board buzzer alarm

PIC Programmable Relay Switch – [Link]

Tiny motion sensor fits wearable devices

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by Susan Nordyk @ edn.com:

Bosch Sensortec’s BMX160 is a 9-axis motion sensor touted as the smallest in the industry for wearable and augmented/virtual-reality devices. The miniature device is housed in a 2.5×3.0×0.95-mm, 14-pin LGA package, small enough for smartphones, smart watches, fitness trackers, and even smart eyewear and jewelry.

Combining an accelerometer, gyroscope, and geomagnetic sensor, the BMX160 meets the increasingly more stringent low-power requirements required by wearable devices. The BMX160 reduces power consumption to below 1.5 mA and effectively replaces the mainstream two-component design, which employs a 6-axis inertial measurement unit and a 3-axis geomagnetic sensor.

Tiny motion sensor fits wearable devices – [Link]

4 Channel Relay Board

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Quad Channel Relay Board is a simple and convenient way to interface 4 relays for switching application in your project.

Features

  • Input supply 12 VDC @ 170 mA
  •  Output four SPDT relay
  •  Relay specification 5 A @ 230 VAC
  •  Trigger level 2 ~ 5 VDC
  •  Berg pins for connecting power and trigger voltage
  •  LED on each channel indicates relay status
  •  Power Battery Terminal (PBT) for easy relay output and aux power connection
  •  Four mounting holes of 3.2 mm each
  •  PCB dimensions 88 mm x 68 mm

4 Channel Relay Board – [Link]

Creating your first IoT Ethernet Device – IoT, Home Automation

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In this series of tutorials show us how easy is to build a IoT Ethernet Device using ESP8266-01 WiFi module and how interface BMP085 barometric sensor, DS1307Z RTC, ILI9431 and log the data on a SD card.

As mentioned, this Instructable is split into two parts. Part (A) documents how relatively simple it is to cross port to Ethernet, extend and further develop an MQTT IoT device based around the ESP8266-01 WiFi enabled module from the earlier Instructable ‘Pimping your first IoT WiFi Device. Part 4 : IoT, Home Automation’

Creating your first IoT Ethernet Device – IoT, Home Automation – [Link]