Nonvolatile memory resists gamma radiation

Maxim DS28E80

Using only one contact to simplify implementations in small, disposable medical sensors, the DS28E80 1-Wire EEPROM from Maxim Integrated Products resists gamma radiation of up to 73 kGy (kiloGray), allowing OEMs to calibrate a consumable medical sensor and to monitor or control unsanitary reuse of medical disposables. Gamma radiation sterilization is typically used on single-use disposable medical sensors and consumables, but the method is incompatible with conventional floating-gate memory technologies, as gamma’s high-ionizing radiation erases the memory.

Nonvolatile memory resists gamma radiation – [Link]

SnapEDA Helps Electronics Designers Turn Ideas Into Products Faster

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Access over 100,000 CAD libraries, including schematic symbols, simulation models, and PCB footprints. Their unique technology exports to all major design tools.

SnapEDA, the fastest and easiest way to find and share electronics design libraries, has introduced new export support for its popular computer-aided design (CAD) library and community.

SnapEDA accelerates the electronic design process for thousands of professional designers and engineers around the world by providing a library of millions of CAD building blocks they can build on top of to design better products faster.

By exporting to popular CAD tools, SnapEDA complements existing workflows, providing engineers with an instant productivity boost in their design tool of choice.

Today, SnapEDA is announcing support of its vast CAD library for Cadence OrCAD/Allegro and Pulsonix users. These new export formats join existing support for Altium, CadSoft Eagle, and KiCad.

In the quickly growing Internet of Things market, electronic devices are proliferating and diversifying, and time-to-market is becoming more crucial than ever for electronics companies looking to stay competitive.

SnapEDA Helps Electronics Designers Turn Ideas Into Products Faster – [Link]

SIM900 USB Communication using MCP2200

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Jesus Echavarria writes:

Hi all! Here’s the new project where I’m working a couple of days. Since I develop the SIM900 module and test it, I don’t work with it. Also, I’ve got at home some samples of the MCP2200 USB bridge that I want to test it. So make an USB interface for this board was the perfect idea! This allows to use the SIM900 board with a PC, Raspberry or similar, with the plus of no need external power supply or control signals. Just plug the USB cable on the board and start communicating with the world!

SIM900 USB Communication using MCP2200 – [Link]

Voltage regulator with backup management

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by elektormagazine.com:

Linear Technology has introduced a voltage supply regulator chip that includes an interface to take care of charging, balancing and monitoring external supercaps (or batteries) for system power backup. Its wide 0.1 V to 5.5 V capacitor/battery voltage and 1.8 V to 5.25V system backup voltage ranges make it suitable for a wide range of backup applications using supercapacitors or batteries. A proprietary low noise switching algorithm optimizes efficiency with capacitor/battery voltages that are above, below or equal to the system output voltage.

The LTC3110 can autonomously transition from charge to backup mode or switch modes based on an external command. Pin-selectable Burst Mode operation reduces standby current and improves light-load efficiency, which combined with a 1 μA shutdown current make the LTC3110 ideally suited for backup applications. Additional features include voltage supervisors for charge direction control, end of charge and a general purpose comparator with open-collector output for interfacing with a microcontroller.

Voltage regulator with backup management – [Link]

App note: Low cost I2C level translator

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2 Diodes, 3 resistors and a transistor here’s Silicon Labs’ low cost solution on voltage level translation. [via]

This applications note discusses a low-cost circuit for I2C level translation. This circuit was developed for the Si701x, Si702x, and Si703x humidity sensors but will work in many applications. This circuit provides I2C level translation from a higher voltage supply, such as 5 V, to a lower voltage, supply such as 1.8 or 3.3 V. In addition, the optional emitter follower circuit provides a low-voltage power supply rail from the higher 5 V supply. Note that some devices allow for higher voltage tolerance on I2C inputs. For example, the Si7034 has a 3.3 V tolerant I2C interface, so the level translation is only required for 5 V I2C designs.

App note: Low cost I2C level translator – [Link]

Arduino, Beaglebone, MCU enclosure with HMI (LCD & keypad)

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by Mircea Daneliuc:

An electronics enclosure with HMI ( I2C LCD and keypad) for projects with sensors and relays. Good for any MCU, Arduino, Beaglebone,AVR

I have searched the net high and low to find a professional looking enclosure with an HMI (Human Machine Interface) that I could use in my project involving sensors and relays, but I wasn’t able to find one. Not for a decent price, that is… Most of the Arduino cases or enclosures were nice little boxes with slots for USB and power adapter but with no real functionality, not enabling the microcontroller to relate to the outside world in any way.

Arduino, Beaglebone, MCU enclosure with HMI (LCD & keypad) – [Link]

Tiny and cheap lab generator

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Bob build a tiny and easy to build function generator. He writes:

Function generator is a rely useful tool in the lab, a simple version can be build at home, there’s a lot of examples on the Internet, some are much more complex and powerful, but this one is intended to be really simple and cheap. It can be also built-in in some bigger projects that also requires a generator.

The generator can output (only) square signal with adjusted frequency and pulse width. The amplitude may be also modified by soldering different values on the voltage divider on the output, it’s a bit laborious, but if it will be used in digital or microprocessor projects, then there isn’t really need for amplitude adjustment.

Tiny and cheap lab generator  – [Link]

Helicopter Temperature Logger

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Rui JC writes:

This circuit is a small “on-board” temperature recorder for RC models.

For those who practice this hobby know that the engine temperature is very important, not only for performance but also to ensure the smooth operation and durability of the engine.

It records the motor temperature of my helicopter in flight 2 times per second and stores it in memory.

Helicopter Temperature Logger – [Link]

EEVblog #754 – Altium Circuit Maker First Impressions

Dave gives his first impression of Altium’s new FREE PCB design tool for the maker community, Circuit Maker.
What are the limitations?
What do you get?

EEVblog #754 – Altium Circuit Maker First Impressions – [Link]

How to use MQ2 Gas Sensor – Arduino Tutorial

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by codebender_cc @ instructables.com:

The MQ series of gas sensors use a small heater inside with an electro-chemical sensor. They are sensitive for a range of gasses and are used indoors at room temperature. The output is an analog signal and can be read with an analog input of the Arduino.

The MQ-2 Gas Sensor module is useful for gas leakage detecting in home and industry. It can detect LPG, i-butane, propane, methane ,alcohol, hydrogen and smoke.

Some modules have a built-in variable resistor to adjust the sensitivity of the sensor.

How to use MQ2 Gas Sensor – Arduino Tutorial – [Link]