Touchscreen-controlled Arduino Geiger Counter


by Toumal @

A touchscreen-controlled Geiger Counter for Arduino. Requires a Radiation Watch Pocket Geiger sensor, a ITDB02 Display from SainSmart and an Arduino Mega.

Software needs my fork of the RadiationWatch library, the ITDB02 library as well as the UTouch library

Touchscreen-controlled Arduino Geiger Counter – [Link]

An Edison-Based Password Keeper


by DanielGilbert @

With this instructable, I try to solve a problem everyone has: Passwords. Accounts. Logins. All the stuff you need to get into your favourite social media site, shopping site, blog or forum (they still exist, huh?). Now, there are several ways to control your accounts:

Use always the same credentials: No. Never ever do that. Seriously. If your account gets hacked on one site, chance is that the hacker(s) will try the credentials on other, popular sites also. Don’t underestimate them. They are smart. Criminals, but smart.
Use a software on every device: You can do that. And if you are lucky, this software will run forever on this device. But maybe, at some point, you will get rid of the devices. Uh-oh…
Write them down: Yepp. You can do that. But – everyone who finds your book will be able to read your passwords. That wouldn’t be that great, right?

To solve all of this, I created a device called “The PinTin Nano”. It has it’s name from the fact that it’s a) pretty small and b) fits in a mint tin. I love that, because that makes the device easy to carry around.

An Edison-Based Password Keeper – [Link]

Arduino Mini Geiger Counter


by paulindallas @

Last Black Friday, the big sale day that comes right after Thanksgiving, I came across a sale on the Electronic Goldmine web site for a Geiger counter kit and tube for about $30. Now I always wanted to play with a Geiger counter, even as a kid back in the 50’s when Uranium, nuclear power, mutant radioactive ants (the movie “THEM” 1954) etc. were all the rage. I figured I was not getting any younger, so I bought it.

Arduino Mini Geiger Counter – [Link]

Getting Started with Arty


by kaitlyn1franz @

Digilent recently released a new FPGA development board. The Arty board. The Arty is designed to be used exclusively with Xilinx Vivado, and designed specifically for use with microblaze.

This tutorial covers how to use the out of he box design that ships loaded into Arty’s Quad-SPI Flash, with I/O and UART.

To view the reference material and other demo projects for Arty, go to the Arty resource center.

Getting Started with Arty – [Link]

TC7106 – 3 1/2 Digit ADC for LCD Display


The TC7106 3½ digit LCD direct-display drive analog-to-digital converter has a reference with a 80ppm/°C max temperature coefficient. TC7106 based systems may be upgraded without changing external passive component values to the TC7106A for a more precise system. High impedance differential inputs offer 1pA leakage current and a 1012 Ohm input impedance. The differential reference input allows ratiometric measurements for ohms or bridge transducer measurements. The 15µVp-p noise performance guarantees a great reading. The auto-zero cycle guarantees a zero display reading with a zero-volts input.

TC7106 – 3 1/2 Digit ADC for LCD Display – [Link]

Record from SOS webinar – Everything you have ever wanted to know about Physics of Humidity

Accuracy in a whole range of relative humidity measurement? You could find out during Sensirion webinar. Did you miss our webinar? Watch the video – record…

What´s possible and what not in the temperature and humidity measurement? Design Guidance & Handling Instructions for your applications and products and also application examples. All of this was led by Maximilian Eichbereger from Sensirion.All participants of the webinar could get development kit EK-H5 for special price and as a bonus could get the SHT31 reference design (functional board) for FREE.

Record from SOS webinar – Everything you have ever wanted to know about Physics of Humidity – [Link]

Bluz Grill Thermometer


Bluz powered probe thermometer to stream temperature data to your smartphone. Never dry out your steaks or chicken again! By Eric Ely:

With summer arriving, and the fear of dried out chicken looming, we wanted a more high tech way to track the temperature of items we are grilling outside. There are wireless probe thermometers, but they require carrying around a separate readout. We wanted a way to read the termperature from our smartphone, so we took the just the thermometer and hooked it to bluz!

Bluz Grill Thermometer – [Link]

Pixy camera: detect the colour of the objects and track their position


By Boris Landoni @

Here we present our first tests with the Pixy camera, a device capable of detecting the colour of the objects, and to track their position.

Until a short time ago, it was really difficult to develop applications able to take advantage of artificial vision algorithms, and most of all by using systems with limited hardware resources.

Luckily, however, things have changed now: in addition to the various open source frameworks that help developers to easily implement even the most complex algorithms, complete peripherals are spreading, be it for the hardware part (providing the acquisition of images coming from the outside world), or for the software part (able to analyze and read such images). With such peripherals it is possible to create applications provided with artificial vision, in a really simple way.

Pixy camera: detect the colour of the objects and track their position – [Link]


Intel Galileo Project: Simple DIY Weather Station


Øyvind Nydal Dahl published a new project on his website:

I’ve played with the Intel Galileo a lot lately, so now it’s time to build some Intel Galileo projects!

In this project I built a very simple weather station that records the temperature and humidity and saves these to a memory card.

I’ll show you how to read temperature and humidity from a DHT11 sensor with the Intel Galileo. Then how to save these values to an SD-card.

Intel Galileo Project: Simple DIY Weather Station – [Link]

New flat transistor defies theoretical limit


by Bob Yirka @

A team of researchers with members from the University of California and Rice University has found a way to get a flat transistor to defy theoretical limitations on Field Effect Transistors (FETs). In their paper published in the journal Nature, the team describes their work and why they believe it could lead to consumer devices that have both smaller electronics and longer battery life. Katsuhiro Tomioka with Erasmus MC University Medical Center in the Netherlands offers a News & Views article discussing the work done by the team in the same journal edition.

New flat transistor defies theoretical limit – [Link]