SinoVoip Unveils Open-spec Banana Pi BPI-P2 Zero SBC

SinoVoIP is going to launch their inexpensive Raspberry Pi Zero compatible, Allwinner H2+ powered board Banana Pi-P2 Zero. This is going to be the successor to Banana Pi M2 Zero. The new Banana Pi-P2 Zero combines support for PoE (Power-over-Ethernet) as well as a CSI camera interface.

Sinovoip Banana Pi BPI-P2 Zero
Sinovoip Banana Pi BPI-P2 Zero

The Banana Pi BPI-P2 Zero is almost identical to last year’s $21 Banana Pi BPI-M2 Zero with a few significant enhancements. The board attaches 8GB eMMC storage, as well as a 10/100 Ethernet port with Power-over-Ethernet support available via an optional PoE module. The new board doubles the weight to 30 grams and extends the smaller dimension by 22.5mm giving it a 65 x 52.5mm footprint.

Other features are almost the same as the M2 Zero, which itself is an emulation of a Raspberry Pi Zero W. The P2 Zero board can run Linux and Android on a 1.2GHz, quad -A7 Allwinner H2+, which is like an Allwinner H3, but with HD instead of 4K video support. The SoC integrates a Mali400 MP2 GPU.

The Banana Pi BPI-P2 Zero comes with 512MB DDR3, a microSD card slot, and a WiFi/Bluetooth module. Other features include MIPI-CSI, 40-pin RPi expansion, a mini-HDMI port, a USB 2.0 host port, and a power-only micro-USB OTG port.

Banana Pi BPI-P2 Zero specifications:

  • SoC: Allwinner H2+ quad-core Arm Cortex A7 processor with Mali-400MP GPU.
  • Memory:
    • 512MB DDR3 SDRAM.
    • 8GB eMMC flash
    • Micro SD card slot
  • Video Output: mini HDMI port
  • Connectivity:                    
    • 10/100M Ethernet with PoE support
    •  WiFi & Bluetooth via AP6212 module
  • The camera I/F: CSI camera interface
  • USB: 1x USB OTG port
  • Expansion:
    • 40-pin GPIO header with UART, SPI, I2C, etc…
    • 3-pin UART header for serial console access
  • Power Supply:                    
    • 5V/2A via micro USB port
    • Power-over-Ethernet (PoE)
  • Dimensions: 65 x 52.5mm
  • Supported OS: Linux, Android

No pricing or availability information was provided for the Banana Pi BPI-P2. More information may be found on SinoVoip’s Banana Pi BPI-P2 Zero wiki page.

Exen Proto – A Tiny 32-bit Arduino Compatible Board

The Exen Mini was categorized as one of the world’s smallest 32-bit Arduino compatible boards that was launched by Nerdonic, although the board was able to get the job done in some areas it still had limited capacity, it had only 8 I/O pins. Based on the success and limitations of the Exen Mini, Nerdonic has launched a new similar board, but with improved I/O options called the Exen Proto.
Exen Proto
Just like the Exen Mini, the Exen Proto is based on Microchip SAMD21 Cortex M0+ microcontroller allowing projects previously built for the Exen Mini board to easily migrate to the new board.

The Exen Proto is a small 32-bit Arduino compatible board based around the Arduino Zero bootloader, so projects built for the Arduino Zero won’t have problems working on the Exen Proto. The Exen Proto board is also breadboard compatible, meaning it will comfortably fit into a standard breadboard without the need for any extra connectors or manipulation.

The board is pretty small as compared to the likes of Arduino Zero and big as compared to its predecessor Exen Mini, it measures for about 14.9 x 29.8 mm and weighs just about 1.1 grams. It comes with 256KB of ROM (Program Memory), 32KB of RAM, processing speed of up to 48MHz, and up 20 I/O pins. The I/O pins include 19x PWM, 11x ADC (Analog), Serial, SPI, I2C and Digital pins. The Exen Proto can be powered by either the Micro USB port, 3.3v to 20v input pin (regulated to 3.3v with a 3.3v output pin), or directly to the 3.3v pin.

The board can be programmed with the Arduino IDE thanks to the pre-flashed Arduino Zero bootloader . The Exen Proto board is expected to come with some add-ons board or shields like a Li-Ion/Li-Po charge and discharge shield that can be charged by either the power pin or the USB port on the Exen Proto.

Below are some of the specifications for the Exen Proto board:

  • MCU – Microchip SAMD21 Cortex M0+ MCU @ 48 MHz with 256KB flash, 32KB SRAM
  • I/Os via 2x 12-pin 2.54mm pitch headers
    • Up to 20x digital I/O
    • Up to 19x PWM
    • Up to 11x analog (ADC) up to 12-bit resolution
    • 2x UART
    • Up to 5x I2C
    • 1x reset
    • Limits – 3.3V, 7mA
  • USB – 1x micro USB port
  • Programming – Via micro USB port or SWD header
  • Misc – Power LED, user LED, button
  • Power Supply
    • 3.3-20V (regulated to 3.3v) via power Pin 1
    • 3.3V via power pin 2
    • 5V (regulated to 3.3v) via Micro USB port
    • Current Draw = ~10mA
  • Dimensions – 29.8 x 14.9 x 4.4mm
  • Weight – 1.1 grams

The Exen Proto board is currently being crowd-funded on Indiegogo and has surpassed its 1000 GBP goal, although that doesn’t matter since the campaign is a flexible campaign. The board is available for purchase from 8 GBP for a single unit excluding shipping. More information about the product can be found on the campaign page.

ATtiny1607 – A TinyAVR MCU Family For Real-Time Control Systems

In continuation of the development of microcontrollers for a real-time control system, Microchip unveils a new set of microcontroller family based around the known Atmel ATtiny family called the ATtiny1607 family. Microchip is hoping to continue support for the Atmel’s famous AVR set of microcontrollers.

Microchip recently launched the PIC18 Q10 family of MCUs earlier on that features multiple intelligent Core Independent Peripherals (CIPs) and was tailored for real-time control systems. The ATtiny1607 family of AVR® microcontrollers (MCUs) offers similar features like the PIC18 Q10 MCUs, it is equipped with high-speed integrated analog, hardware-based Core Independent Peripherals (CIPs) and low-power performance for efficient, real-time control and sensor node applications in a small physical footprint to help optimize board layout.

The family offers a lot of options; it is made up of about ten different MCUs coming in different package type from DIP to QFN, which makes it ideal for space-constrained closed-loop system especially the 3 x 3 mm 20-pin QFN package. The family offers a broad range of memory, pin and package configurations, program memory from  2KB to 16KB, SRAM from 256 Bytes to 1024 Bytes, pin count from 8 to 24 pin packages, and MCUs in the family all have 12 ADC input.

The family offers an accurate and temperature-stable 20 MHz internal RC oscillator, a configurable custom logic (CCL) and core independent peripherals. These inbuilt features nullify the need for external components which will help it in reducing the cost of the final product.

Below are some of the ATtiny 1607 key attributes:

  • Internal 20 MHz oscillator
  • Up to 16 KB of FLASH memory
  • Up to 12-channel, 115 ksps 10-bit ADC
  • Cyclic Redundancy Check (CRC) scan
  • 16-bit Real-Time Clock and Periodic Interrupt Timer
  • Configurable Custom Logic (CCL) peripheral
  • 3-channel Peripheral Event System
  • Analog Comparator with a scalable reference input
  • Configurable, internally generated reference voltage
  • USART / SPI / dual-mode TWI
  • Available with up to 22 I/O

Getting started to work with the ATtiny 1607 is straightforward. An evaluation kit called ATmega4809-XPRO Evaluation Kit is available for getting starting with the family. It is the ideal platform for rapid prototyping of the new tinyAVR and even megaAVR® MCUs. The kit is a USB powered kit and features an onboard programmer and debugger that seamlessly integrates with Atmel Studio and other peripherals. The board also has a MikroBUS™ -compatible socket, allowing you to easily add sensors, actuators or communications interfaces from Mikroelektronika’s extensive library of click boards™.

ATmega 4809 Evaluation Kit

Development time for the ATtiny1607 can be greatly reduced by using Atmel START, an intuitive web-based graphical configuration tool for embedded projects. Atmel START generates factory-validated C-code to help get an embedded design started. More informaton about Atmel START can be found here.

The tinyAVR® microcontrollers are well-suited for a wide range of applications including industrial, consumer, appliance, automotive and Internet of Things (IoT) sensor nodes. More information about the product family is available on the product page.

Evervision expands all-in-one HDMI TFT displays portfolio

Evervision Electronics Europe has expanded its range of HDMI TFT displays to address growing demand, adding five new display sizes to its portfolio. [via]

The Evervision HDMI TFT displays modules are available in 5″, 7″, 8″, 9″and 10.1″ TFT LCD displays in different technologies (TN, Ultra Wide Viewing, IPS display), resolutions and brightness and having all the option of Capacitive Touch or No Touch Panel. Display resolutions come at 800×480 pixels for the 5″ and 7″ units (TN Type), 1024×600 pixels for the IPS type 7″ TFT displays, 800×480 pixels for the 8″ and 9″ TN Type units and 1280×800 pixels for the 10.1″ TFT displays (IPS). The HDMI Interface Controller Board includes Mini HDMI and Mini USB connectors, with an integrated backlight driver and dimming via PWM. All components used are carefully selected, available in the long term and meet the highest quality requirements. The HDMI display solutions are available with and without capacitive touch panel. Tool costs are not required. The operating temperature range is from – 20°C to + 70°C.

Evervision Electronics – www.evervisionlcd.com

Seco’s New i.MX8M And i.MX8Quad Based Modules Run Linux

Seco Embedded Creators have launched the i.MX8M based Q7-C25 and i.MX8Quad based Q7-C26. Both can run Linux and Android, and are available in 0 to 60°C and -40 to 85°C models. The 5V modules have many similar features, but the Q7-C26 based on the more powerful, up to hexacore i.MX8Quad adds some extras such as SATA III support.

Seco Q7-C25
Seco Q7-C25

The Q7-C25 utilizes NXP’s dual- or quadcore, 1.5GHz Cortex-A53 i.MX8M. It facilitates a 266MHz Cortex-M4 MCU and a Vivante GC7000Lite GPU. Unlike the Quad and Dual models, the quad-core i.MX8M QuadLite model lacks a VPU.

On the other hand, the Q7-C26 features the more powerful i.MX8Quad, which is available in quad A53 configurations, but clocked to a lower 1.26GHz. All three i.MX8Quad Quad models also accommodate dual Cortex-M4 MCUs and dual GC7000Lite GPUs. The mid-range i.MX8QuadPlus model combines 1x Cortex-A72 core and the high-end QuadMax adds 2x -A72 cores.

Seco Q7-C26
Seco Q7-C26

Both the Q7-C25 and Q7-C26 ship with onboard LPDDR4-3200 RAM, but only the Q7-C25 lists a quantity, which is up to 4GB. They both offer presumably optional eMMC and QSPI flash onboard, but no quantities are listed. Only the Q7-C26 supports SATA III, but it’s a factory option swap-out for one of the 2x PCIe x1 interfaces provided by both modules. Both COMs also combine a GbE controller.

Both the Q7-C25 and Q7-C26 support up to 4096 x 2160p60 video output with HDR via an HDMI 2.0A port. On the Q7-C26 DisplayPort 1.3 is supported, and the Q7-C26 also supports HDCP 2.2. Both modules also provide an HD-ready LVDS interface, I2S audio, and a MIPI-CSI camera interface.

The Q7-C25 supports 5x USB ports compared to 6x on the Q7-C26. Yet on the Q7-C25, two of those are USB 3.0 compared to one on the Q7-C26, which is the only one to support a USB OTG port. Common features on both modules are 2x I2C, 8x GPIO, and single UART, CAN, SPI, and SD connections. They both supply a watchdog and power management signals and the Q7-C26 also features a boot select signal.

Both modulessupport the same 3.5-inch form-factor, cross-platform (Arm and x86) CQ7-A42 carrier board. Another option is a Q7 Dev Kit 2.0 that offers a different and much larger CQ7-A30 board with more legacy connections.

No pricing or availability information was provided for the  Q7-C25 and Q7-C26 modules or related carrier boards and kits as they are currently under development. More information may be found in the following Seco product pages for Q7-C25Q7-C26CQ7-A42 and Q7 Dev Kit 2.0.

FriendlyELEC Launches a new Samsung Powered Octa-Core Board

Smart6818 is a board built for industrial applications and is a successor to the Smart210 board. At the heart of the Smart6818 is the powerful Samsung Octa-Core Cortex-A53 S5P6818 SoC which is able to have a dynamic scaling frequency of up to 1.4Ghz unlike the 1GHz provided by Samsung S5PV210 for the Smart210 board.

FriendlyElec Smart6818 Module

The Smart6818 board has an interesting 2.0mm pitch double row pin headers (P1, P2, and P4) containing a whopping 174 pins in total. These pins contain pretty popular interface pins. By default, it has the 2 opposites pin rows (P1 and P2) soldered on the board leaving P4 for user’s applications.

The standard version of the board comes packed with 1GB DDR3 RAM and an 8GB eMMC, with support for software power-off and Real Time Clock (RTC) alarm power-on functions. In Linux, the real-time clock alarm can be set or retrieved using /proc/acpi/alarm or /sys/class/rtc/rtc0/wakealarm.

Also, its Gbps Ethernet and audio jack make it super duper suitable for various industrial applications. It works with various FriendlyELEC LCDs such as the 3.5″ LCD, 4.3″ LCD, 5″ LCD, 7″ LCD like a Lenovo tablet and the larger 10.1″LCD screen.

Below are some of the board core specs:

  • SoC: Samsung S5P6818 Octa-Core Cortex-A53, 400MHz – 1.4GHz
  • PMU Power Management: Implemented by an MCU, support software power-off, and RTC alarm power-on functions
  • DDR3 RAM: 1GB 32bit DDR3 RAM
  • Ethernet: Gbps Ethernet(RTL8211E) with unique MAC
  • eMMC: 8GB
  • Audio: 1 x audio codec chip, 1 x onboard Microphone and 1 x audio jack
  • LED: 1 x Power LED, 2 x GPIO LED
  • PCB Dimension: 74 x 55 mm, Six-Layer
  • Power: DC 5V, up to 2A
  • Temperature measuring range: -40℃ to 80℃
  • OS/Software: u-boot, Android5.1/4.4, Debian8, ubuntu-core
  • PINS: 3 x 2.0mm pitch double row pin header, 174 pins in totals
  • USB: USB 2.0 – Host x1, OTG x1
  • Video output/Display: RGB Parallel I/F (24-bit), LVDS and HDMI 1.4a
  • Video input: DVP Camera interface, ITU-R BT 601/656 8-bit and MIPI-CSI
  • Audio input: Microphone
  • Audio output: Audio jack (with headset detection) and HDMI audio
  • Ethernet: 10/100/1000Mbps Ethernet x 1
  • ADC (Analog-to-Digital Converter): CPU internal ADC, 7 channels, 12-bit, range: 0 ~ 1.8V
  • External interface: SDIO/MMC x2, SPI x2, I2C x3, UART x5, PWM x3, GPIOs x24
  • Others: Power key input, RESET input, RESET output, RTC battery input

An SDK carrier board is available for the Smart6818 which enables the smart6818 CPU board’s various ports and interfaces. The carrier board has a SATA interface and a mini PCIe interface that supports an external 4G module. One incentive with this board is that it offers compatibility with the Raspberry Pi’s interface.

 

Smart6818 SDK Carrier Board

Before start to use the Smart6818, one will need to get the following items ready:

  • Smart6818 CPU board and Smart 6818 SDK carrier board
  • Standard SD card: Class10 or above 8GB SDHC card
  • A DC 12V/2A power is a must.
  • HDMI monitor or LCD
  • USB keyboard and mouse
  • A host computer running Ubuntu 14.04 64 bit system

The Smart6818 board is available for purchase on the friendly arm store for about $49.00. The board also comes with other add-ons which will add extra features to it. More information about the product is available on the product page.

PopCom – Identify your COM ports

avishorp has written a small program that pops up a message whenever a serial port over USB device is plugged in, that is available on GitHub (code).

PopCom is a COM port plug-in/plug-out notifier. Whenever a USB device that emulates a COM port is connected to the computer, a pop-up will be displayed, describing the device that has been plugged in and the COM number assigned to it. This pop-up helps determining the COM number assigned to each device, a number that is required for communicating with it.

PopCom – Identify your COM ports – [Link]

Sapphire’s New FS-FP5V SBC Incorporates Ryzen Embedded V1000 SoC

Sapphire Technology, a Hong Kong-based technology company, has launched a 147.3 x 139.7mm Mini-STX (almost 5×5-inch) form factor SBC that runs Ubuntu 16.04 or Windows. It is powered by AMD’s new Ryzen Embedded V1000 SoC. AMD’s Ryzen V1000 is highly competitive on CPU performance with the latest Intel Core chips, and the Radeon Vega graphics with it, are superior enough for enabling four 4K displays to run at once.

Sapphire's FS-FP5V SBC
Sapphire’s FS-FP5V SBC

The only other Ryzen V1000 based SBC, 120 x 120mm is Udoo Bolt, which ships to Kickstarter backers in December. Sapphire’s commercial board FS-FP5V is available for sale now with shipments beginning later this month.

The FS-FP5V base model starts at $325, equipped with the dual-core, quad-thread V1202B version of the Ryzen V1000 with lower-end Vega 3 graphics. The three models with the quad-core, octa-threaded versions of the SoC go for $340, $390, and $450, with increasing clock speeds and graphics ranging from Vega 8 to 11.

Pricing, which does not include RAM or storage, seems to be a bit higher than the Udoo Bolt. The Bolt also adds an Atmega32U4 MCU for Arduino and Grove compatibility but is limited to the two lower-end V1000 SoC models. The FS-FP5V, which has up to 4x DisplayPorts, is more directly aimed at digital signage and other media-centric applications including electronic gaming, medical imaging, thin clients, and POS terminals.

This is Sapphire’s first Mini-STX SBC. Its other AMD-based motherboards include AMD R-Series based Mini-ITX boards and some 4×4-inch eNUC form factor boards such as the G-Series based LX 210. A Sapphire representative says his company can make custom boards based on the Ryzen V1000. They also show a Kubb enclosure for the FS-FP5V from Bleujour, as well as an upcoming 2×2 digital signage display wall from Seneca Data that taps the FS-FP5V to generate 4x 4K displays.

The FS-FP5V is available now starting at $325, with shipments starting later this month. More information may be found on Sapphire’s FS-FP5V product page.

PCBWay Offers Low Cost SMD Stencils

A new offer has been thrown to the public by PCBWay; The public can now get various sizes of SMD (Surface Mounted Devices) stencils. A stencil is a utensil that contains a perforated sheet through which ink can be forced to create a printed pattern onto another surface. It allows a person to know where precisely each component and solder would go on the SMD pads. The nature of SMD stencil influences the quality of the completed PCB because a poorly placed SMD stencil will not only render the SMD component useless, it will most likely make the whole device useless.

PCBWay is offering to existing and new customers to order for an SMD Stencil job. The SMD Stencils being offered by PCBWay are made up of 14 different sizes, with starting size of 370mm x 470mm with a valid area of 190mm x 290mm, and the biggest size available to be 500m x 1400mm with a valid area of 320mm x 1200mm. When ordering you can choose a framework if you want one and there are four thickness options to pick from. It is important to note that the size and thickness of the stencil determine the amount and shape of the applied solder paste.

Lasered Stencils are also an option, and a person can decide to have the stencil lasered half way or lasered through. When the halfway option is chosen, it is important to note that this means the stencil will be lasered from the bottom to middle.

There is also a chance to have your stencil go through electropolishing, aq process that ensures there is maximum optimization of the surface quality of the SMD stencils after laser processing. Electropolishing, also called electrochemical deburring is carried out by an acid rinse with additional applied voltage, to control the cutting of roughness. This is simply a finishing service and is not compulsory.

Once done with stencil selection choices, customers will have the option to pay using PayPal, Credit card, or one of the several payment options. Shipping will be done by DHL, FedEx, TNT, Aramex, Hongkong post, E-pack, and many more. DHL is preferred as the default option.

Get started with PCBWay SMD Stencil by visiting their stencil page here.

Wyostat: Open source Thermostat

Kevin has been working on building his own thermostat. He writes:

Does the world need another connected thermostat? When my thermostat went on the blink last winter, I looked at Nest, and Ecobee, and the other me-too thermostats, and I decided I would rather build my own.

Wyostat: Open source Thermostat – [Link]