3 MilliWatt-Consumption Data Glasses

Data glasses display information to the eye without interfering with the wearer‘s vision but they run energy down very quickly due to the consumption of electronics while processing video images and data. Researchers at  Fraunhofer Institute for Organic Electronics, Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP had developed a new data glass that has low-power consumption. Received using a radio link, the glasses is able to display images to the wearer while his/her hands are free.

These glasses also goes bright even the power is somehow low thanks to the OLEDs embedded to a silicon semiconductor which controls the individual pixels. Plus, they have the ability to perceive light from the environment around not only emit it.

© Photo Fraunhofer FEP

Another reason to high power consumption in data glasses is loading the data stream, but FEP researchers have came up with a new way to reduce it by changing only objects that are changed and keep the constant ones,

“We now control the chip so that the entire video image is not constantly renewed, rather only that part of the display in which something changes.” – Project manager Philipp Wartenberg “For example, if an actor runs through a room in a movie, only his position changes, not the background. In applications such as a navigation system for cyclists, in which only arrows or metre information is displayed, it is unnecessary in any case to constantly renew the whole picture, to put it simply, we have now adapted the circuit so that it only lets through that portion of the data stream which changes.”

FEP data glasses requires an output of 2-3 milliWatts, a fraction of the output need for ordinary displays – around 200 milliWatts.

The new display was presented at the electronica trade fair in Munich on November 08-11, 2016 and its developers hope to see it used by athletes and private clients. You can read more about it at the press release.

These tiny batteries can be charged in seconds and last for a week

Battery anxiety is a modern day problem for many of us. Mobile phone and wearable technologies are getting developed rapidly, but battery issues seem to be neverending. As phones and wearables are getting thinner, there needs to be a trade-off between battery life and design. Scientists are searching for a way to make a battery that’s tiny yet capable of holding the charge for a long time. So, what’s the solution? Supercapacitor.

Flexible Laser Scribed Graphene Supercapacitor
Flexible Laser Scribed Graphene (LSG) Supercapacitor

Scientists have been researching on the use of nanomaterials to improve supercapacitors that could enhance or even replace batteries in electronic devices. But it’s not an easy task. Considering a typical supercapacitor, it must be a large one to store as much energy as a Li-ion battery holds.

To tackle the battery issue, a team of scientists at the University of Central Florida (UCF) has created a tiny supercapacitor battery applying newly discovered two-dimensional materials with only a few atoms thick layer. Surprisingly, the new process created at UCF yields a supercapacitor that doesn’t degrade even after it’s been recharged/discharged 30,000 times. Where a lithium-ion battery can be recharged less than 1,500 times without significant failure.

So, what else makes the supercapacitor special apart from their tiny size? Well, let’s hear it from Nitin Choudhary, a postdoctoral associate who conducted much of the research :

If they were to replace the batteries with these supercapacitors, you could charge your mobile phone in a few seconds and you wouldn’t need to charge it again for over a week.

Supercapacitors are not used in mobile devices for their large size. But the team at UCF has developed supercapacitors composed of millions of nanometer-thick wires coated with shells of two-dimensional materials. A highly conductive core helps fast electron transfer for fast charging and discharging. And uniformly coated shells of two-dimensional (2D) materials produce high energy and power densities.

Nanowire Supercapacitor Made of Capacitive 2D WS2 Layers
Nanowire Supercapacitor Made of Capacitive 2D WS2 Layers

Scientists already knew 2D materials held great promise for energy storage purpose. But until the UCF developed the process for integrating those materials, it was not possible to realize that potential. Nitin Choudhary said,

For small electronic devices, our materials are surpassing the conventional ones worldwide in terms of energy density, power density, and cyclic stability.

Supercapacitors that use the new materials could be used in phones, wearables, other electronic gadgets, and electric vehicles. Though it’s not ready for commercialization yet. But the research team at UCF hopes this technology will soon end the battery problem of smartphones and other devices. So let’s wait awhile, and at the end of this year maybe you’ll be using a new smartphone that can be charged in seconds and lasts for a week, who knows!

30 Minutes HIV Detection Using USB Stick

In partnership with DNA Electronics,  Imperial College London researchers had developed a revolutionary USB stick that can detect HIV in the bloodstream.

In order to detect the virus, it’s enough to use a drop of blood. Then the USB stick generates an electrical signal that can be read by a computer, laptop or handheld device.

“We have taken the job done by equipment the size of a large photocopier, and shrunk it down to a USB chip” – Dr Graham Cooke, study author

This detection is useful for HIV patients for managing their treatment and to maintain their health. The longer the detection of HIV virus the harder to treat it, because antiretroviral treatment that is used for HIV may stop changing the status due to the resistance built by the virus to the medicine. This what the USB stick is working to solve, providing accurate results in a surprisingly short time.

To implement this, researcher had worked on “a novel complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) chip based, pH-mediated, point-of-care HIV-1 viral load monitoring assay that simultaneously amplifies and detects HIV-1 RNA”.

Conventional ways to test HIV may take several days, but this device is promising to give results in less than 30 minutes! In addition, the detection can be done remotely, which allows faster detection for patients by themselves, and for some areas that don’t have advanced lab tests.

“This is a great example of how this new analysis technology has the potential to transform how patients with HIV are treated by providing a fast, accurate and portable solution. At DNAe we are already applying this highly adaptable technology to address significant global threats to health, where treatment is time-critical and needs to be right first time.” – Professor Chris Toumazou, DNAe’s Founder, Executive Chairman and Regius Professor at the Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering at Imperial College London

Partnering with DNA Electronics was a great step for the researchers since this company is using similar technology to develop devices for detecting bacterial and fungal sepsis and antibiotic resistance. Right now, researchers are now looking for possibilities to advance their work and to check the ability that the device can detect other viruses such as hepatitis.

This research was funded by the National Institute for Health Research Imperial Biomedical Research Centre and it was published in Scientific Reports. You can learn more about it by checking the article “Novel pH sensing semiconductor for point-of-care detection of HIV-1 viremia” and the press release.

Flex Sensor to bargraph monitor using PIC16F886

Tiny Bar-Graph display provide a Red color, bright, easy to read display which is proportional to the force applied on the FLEX sensor surface.  This Bar-Graph has 20 segments in single color and display Force applied on FLEX sensor. The Barograph force monitor is based on PIC microcontroller with 10 Bit resolution ADC.  This high performance measurement provides unique capabilities and can be used in various applications. Each LED output provided with Solder- jumper for output set point, which can be configured for output control, alarm, Relay.

Force sensing resistors are polymer think film devices which exhibits a decrease in resistance with an increase in the force applied to the active surface. Its force sensitivity is optimized for use in human touch control of electronic devices.
Flex Sensor to bargraph monitor using PIC16F886 – [Link]

Smart IoT Postbox with Arduino, ESP-01, and idIoTware Shield

When you are waiting for a very important letter to come, it’s really bothersome to go and check the postbox again and again. The problem gets worse when you are not at home and anxiously thinking if the letter arrived or not. Well, now IoT or Internet Of Things is your savior.

Following this project by CuriosityGym, you can make your own smart IoT postbox that sends you an email as soon as a letter is dropped into it.

Requirements :

  1. Arduino UNO
  2. idIoTware shield
  3. USB cable (A to B)
  4. Esp 8266 – 01 programmed with ESP-link firmware
  5. One jumper
  6. One Postbox (You can make it yourself)
  7. External 9v 1A Power adapter
  8. Double sided sticky tape
  9. Arduino UNO code (Download it)

Description :

The concept is not complicated at all. The idIoTware Shield has a set of RGB LED and an LDR. The RGB LED always emits white light and it’s received by the LDR. As soon as a letter is dropped, there is an interruption in light. The change in light intensity is sensed by LDR and processed by Arduino. Finally, ESP 8266 connects to IFTTT network and sends an email to a saved email ID.

IdIoTware Shield For ArduinoUNO
idIoTware Shield For ArduinoUNO

IFTTTIFTTT is a free web-based service that allows users to create chains of simple conditional statements, called “applets”, which are triggered based on changes to other web services such as Gmail, Facebook, Instagram, and Pinterest. IFTTT is an abbreviation of “If This Then That”.

This can be explained using a simple analogy: “If the battery is empty then charge it”.

Watch this video for more information on IFTTT.

Procedure :

Simply place the idIoTware shield on Arduino UNO and Connect the esp8266(01) module to the ESP-01 header on the top right, such that the antenna is facing outside (See the image given below). It’s important to connect a jumper to CH_PD pin on the shield.

Smart IoT Postbox using Arduino and IdIoTware Shield
Smart IoT Postbox using Arduino and IdIoTware Shield

To make an IFTTT applet, go to IFTTT.com and make an account. Then, you need to make an applet as “If Maker then Gmail“. So, select Maker by searching and add your Maker channel (in URL field). Now, search for Gmail and select it. Define whom to and what to mail. Finish your applet, and you are all set.

Finally, upload the code to ArduinoUNO. Once the code is uploaded,  place the Arduino with double sided sticky tape inside the postbox. Don’t forget to insulate the Arduino from metallic body of the postbox.

Testing :

Power the Arduino from a 9V adapter and connect it to a serial monitor. Now post a letter in the postbox and you will see the message “New Letter!!” in the serial monitor. When you check your mail you will find a mail saying the same.

For a better understanding, watch the video:

How to use an RGB LED with Arduino

educ8s.tv uploaded a new video on their youtube channel.

Hey guys, I am Nick and welcome to educ8s.tv a channel that is all about DIY electronics projects with Arduino, Raspberry Pi, ESP8266 and other popular boards. In this video we are going to learn how to use an RGB led with Arduino, a very interesting type of LED. As you can see I have connected this LED to an Arduino Uno and every second it changes its color. That’s very handy because we can use only one LED in our projects and produce many colors!

How to use an RGB LED with Arduino – [Link]

Sensing current on the high side

Michael Dunn @ edn.com writes:

At their heart, the majority of DC current sense circuits start with a resistance in a supply line (though magnetic field sensing is a good alternative, especially in higher-current scenarios). One simply measures the voltage drop across the resistor and scales it as desired to read current (E = I × R (if I didn’t include this, someone would complain)). If the sense resistor is in the ground leg, then the solution is a simple op-amp circuit. Everything stays referenced to ground, and you only have to be careful about small voltage drops in the ground layout.

Sensing current on the high side – [Link]

Tiny LED Time Watch

tinytimewatch

David Johnson-Davies designed a minimalist ATtiny85-based watch using 12 LEDs, arranged like a clock face, to show the time in analogue-style. He writes:

To show the time you press the button on the watch face, and the time is then displayed for four seconds. It lights one LED to show the hour, and flashes another LED to show the minutes to the nearest five minutes, like the hour and minute hands on a clock. If only one LED lights up you know that both hands are pointing to the same hour mark.

Tiny LED Time Watch – [Link]

RELATED POSTS

PCB Rax – A modular system for holding circuit boards

pcb-rax-01-1024x657

The PCB Rax is an easy to use, versatile printed circuit board holder for repair, prototyping , and assembly that can hold nearly any shape of circuit board. Check the details on the link below.

Not all circuit boards are rectangular. PCB Rax was designed to hold all kinds of different shaped circuit boards, from circles to christmas trees, and everything in-between. PCB Rax comes standard with 10″ connecting rods that can hold rectangular boards up to 9-1/4″ x 8″, and odd shaped boards up to 6-1/2″ x 8″. For larger projects the connecting rods can be replaced.

PCB Rax – A modular system for holding circuit boards – [Link]

Low-cost current monitor tracks high dc currents

dc-current-measure

Susanne Nell @ edn.com has a design idea on how to measure high dc currents.

To measure high levels of direct current for overload detection and protection, designers frequently use either a current-shunt resistor or a toroidal core and Hall-effect magnetic-field sensor. Both methods suffer from drawbacks. For example, measuring 20A with a 10-mΩ resistor dissipates 4W of power as waste heat. The Hall-effect sensor delivers accurate measurements and wastes little power, but it’s an expensive approach to simple current monitoring.

Low-cost current monitor tracks high dc currents – [Link]