AC Motor Speed Controller for Modern Appliances Using LS7311

The project specifically designed for motor speed control application in appliances such as blenders, etc. Tact switches provided for selecting/indicating from 1 to 10 power levels ( Speed Levels).  The project is ideal for universal and shaded-pole motor speed control for modern appliances design. Eliminates awkward mechanical switch assemblies and multi-taped motor winding.

Features

  • 10 Tact Switch for Speed Selection
  • 10 LEDS for speed indication
  • On Board Stop and Start Switches ( Start Switch Latch Operation)
  • Momentary Run Switch
  • Supply 230V ( 110V Possible Refer Data sheet for components Change)
  • 300W Load
  • On Board snubber for Inductive Load
  • No Separate DC power supply required

AC Motor Speed Controller for Modern Appliances Using LS7311 – [Link]

TP4056 3V3 Load Share Upgrade

A lot of project are battery powered and some of them need dual battery links. Robert on hackaday.io had shared his new project that shed light on this issue. He built an load sharing addon board with the ability to charge the battery while the project is operating.

Many Chinese charger boards are out there based on TP4056, but these boards don’t have the load sharing or voltage regulator features.

Load sharing means that you can power your circuit in two ways, from battery and from Vcc if a charger is connected. Once the charger is connected the battery will start charging and the load will be powered directly from Vcc. Robert added this feature to a recent design and also he added voltage regulation by using MCP1252.

The Components needed to build this project:

  • 1x  MCP1252-33X50/MS Power: Management IC / Switching Regulators
  • 1x  FDN304P: Discrete Semiconductors / Diode-Transistor Modules
  • 1x  SGL1-40-DIO: Schottky diode
  • 2x  100k 1206 resistor
  • 3x  10uF 1206 capacitor X7R
  • 1x  2.2uF 0805 capacitor X7R
  • 1x  ON/OFF switch (optional)
  • 2x  2 pin pcb connector
  • 1x  PCB from OSHpark

This schematic was inspired by multiple designs and modified by Robert.

“The advantage of MCP1252 is automatic buck/boost feature, it will maintain the regulated output voltage whether the input voltage is above or below the output voltage (2.1 to 5.0 V input range) so it is ideal for the lithium battery voltage. If you read the datasheet for the MCP1252-33X50I/MS there is clearly specified what type of MLCC capacitor should be used.”

The maximum output current of this board is 120mA and the output voltage is 3.3 V. It may sound not that suitable for your projects if you want to power an ESP8266, but still you can build your own board with different components to achieve the outputs you need. For example, by using MCP1253, which is identical to MCP1252, you will get  higher switching frequency (1MHz). Robert’s plan is to use this board with CO2 sensor (about 30 mA) and other low power sensors, some MCU and LCD, which can be powered using 120 mA.

Some measurements will be done to test the functionality of this board. To keep updated with the news of this project, you can follow the project on hackaday.io. You can also check other projects by Robert here.

ZeroPhone – a Raspberry Pi smartphone

Arsenijs build a Pi-powered open-source mobile phone (that you can assemble for 50$ in parts).

Currently, it costs about 50$ in parts, and all the parts are available on eBay. No BGA or other difficultly solderable ICs are used (with the obvious exception of Pi Zero). User interface is written using Python, and there’s a phone-tailored UI framework in the works (so far, it uses pyLCI for interfacing). However, even current state of it is further that other projects have come.

ZeroPhone – a Raspberry Pi smartphone – [Link]

Thermometer That Pushes Arduino to Its Limits

by gundolf @ instructables.com:

Starting playing with Arduino seems simple enough. You can find all sorts of tutorials, instructables, wiring and code examples for pretty much every sensor, component, or module available. So far so good. But when the time comes for building a more complex device, the troubles start. The tutorials for adding multiple modules to Arduino and then working with them efficiently are very scarce. Therefore, with this instructable, I will try to help with just that. So here comes the Arduino thermometer/hygrometer with a GUI, designed to push Arduino to its limits.

Thermometer That Pushes Arduino to Its Limits – [Link]

Alarm System Powered By Arduino

Dejan Nedelkovski had built an Arduino security and alarm system project that uses an ultrasonic sensor for detecting objects and a buzzer for notification.

Components needed to build this simple system are: Arduino board, LCD display, 4×4 keypad, ultrasonic sensor and buzzer. The circuit can be connected as shown in the schematics below.

In order to build the project, you have to connect the buzzer with a PWM pin and the keypad pins where 4 of the 8 pins are for rows and the rest are for columns.

“The 4×4 keypad has 8 pins, 4 of them are for the rows and 4 of them for the columns of the keypad. Each button is actually a push button switch which makes a short between one row and column when pressed. So, for example, if we set the row 1 line low, and all column lines high, when we will press, for example, the button 3, due to the short between the two lines, the column 3 line will drop to low so in such a case we can register that the button 3 has been pressed.”

For connecting the LCD display and ultrasonic sensor you can check this detailed video tutorial by Dejan Nedelkovski and to see the project in action:

We want to activate the alarm by setting the A button to activate it. B button is used to change the password, and you need to enter the preset password “1234” to be able to change it.
After activating the alarm by pressing A, a 200 milliseconds sound will be produced from the buzzer showing that the alarm is now active. A message on the LCD display will appear to saying “Alarm will be activated in” and a countdown will be running afterwards until the alarm is completely active. At the end of the countdown a ” Alarm Activated” is on the display and the sensor will start working. Comparing with the initial distance at the start, the sensor will measure the distance is smaller than the initial distance, corrected by a value of 10 cms. The buzzer will  produce a sound if an object is observed as per the condition.

Here’s the complete source code of the Arduino alarm system:

/*
* Arduino Security and Alarm System
*
* by Dejan Nedelkovski,
* www.HowToMechatronics.com
*
*/
#include <LiquidCrystal.h> // includes the LiquidCrystal Library 
#include <Keypad.h>
#define buzzer 8
#define trigPin 9
#define echoPin 10
long duration;
int distance, initialDistance, currentDistance, i;
int screenOffMsg =0;
String password="1234";
String tempPassword;
boolean activated = false; // State of the alarm
boolean isActivated;
boolean activateAlarm = false;
boolean alarmActivated = false;
boolean enteredPassword; // State of the entered password to stop the alarm
boolean passChangeMode = false;
boolean passChanged = false;
const byte ROWS = 4; //four rows
const byte COLS = 4; //four columns
char keypressed;
//define the cymbols on the buttons of the keypads
char keyMap[ROWS][COLS] = {
  {'1','2','3','A'},
  {'4','5','6','B'},
  {'7','8','9','C'},
  {'*','0','#','D'}
};
byte rowPins[ROWS] = {14, 15, 16, 17}; //Row pinouts of the keypad
byte colPins[COLS] = {18, 19, 20, 21}; //Column pinouts of the keypad
Keypad myKeypad = Keypad( makeKeymap(keyMap), rowPins, colPins, ROWS, COLS); 
LiquidCrystal lcd(1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7); // Creates an LC object. Parameters: (rs, enable, d4, d5, d6, d7) 
void setup() { 
  lcd.begin(16,2); 
  pinMode(buzzer, OUTPUT); // Set buzzer as an output
  pinMode(trigPin, OUTPUT); // Sets the trigPin as an Output
  pinMode(echoPin, INPUT); // Sets the echoPin as an Input
}
void loop() {
  if (activateAlarm) {
    lcd.clear();
    lcd.setCursor(0,0);
    lcd.print("Alarm will be");
    lcd.setCursor(0,1);
    lcd.print("activated in");
   
    int countdown = 9; // 9 seconds count down before activating the alarm
    while (countdown != 0) {
      lcd.setCursor(13,1);
      lcd.print(countdown);
      countdown--;
      tone(buzzer, 700, 100);
      delay(1000);
    }
    lcd.clear();
    lcd.setCursor(0,0);
    lcd.print("Alarm Activated!");
    initialDistance = getDistance();
    activateAlarm = false;
    alarmActivated = true;
  }
  if (alarmActivated == true){
      currentDistance = getDistance() + 10;
      if ( currentDistance < initialDistance) {
        tone(buzzer, 1000); // Send 1KHz sound signal 
        lcd.clear();
        enterPassword();
      }
    }
  if (!alarmActivated) {
    if (screenOffMsg == 0 ){
      lcd.clear();
      lcd.setCursor(0,0);
      lcd.print("A - Activate");
      lcd.setCursor(0,1);
      lcd.print("B - Change Pass");
      screenOffMsg = 1;
    }
    keypressed = myKeypad.getKey();
     if (keypressed =='A'){        //If A is pressed, activate the alarm
      tone(buzzer, 1000, 200);
      activateAlarm = true;            
    }
    else if (keypressed =='B') {
      lcd.clear();
      int i=1;
      tone(buzzer, 2000, 100);
      tempPassword = "";
      lcd.setCursor(0,0);
      lcd.print("Current Password");
      lcd.setCursor(0,1);
      lcd.print(">");
      passChangeMode = true;
      passChanged = true;   
      while(passChanged) {      
      keypressed = myKeypad.getKey();
      if (keypressed != NO_KEY){
        if (keypressed == '0' || keypressed == '1' || keypressed == '2' || keypressed == '3' ||
            keypressed == '4' || keypressed == '5' || keypressed == '6' || keypressed == '7' ||
            keypressed == '8' || keypressed == '9' ) {
         tempPassword += keypressed;
         lcd.setCursor(i,1);
         lcd.print("*");
         i++;
         tone(buzzer, 2000, 100);
        }
      }
      if (i > 5 || keypressed == '#') {
        tempPassword = "";
        i=1;
        lcd.clear();
        lcd.setCursor(0,0);
        lcd.print("Current Password");
        lcd.setCursor(0,1);
        lcd.print(">"); 
      }
      if ( keypressed == '*') {
        i=1;
        tone(buzzer, 2000, 100);
        if (password == tempPassword) {
          tempPassword="";
          lcd.clear();
          lcd.setCursor(0,0);
          lcd.print("Set New Password");
          lcd.setCursor(0,1);
          lcd.print(">");
          while(passChangeMode) {
            keypressed = myKeypad.getKey();
            if (keypressed != NO_KEY){
              if (keypressed == '0' || keypressed == '1' || keypressed == '2' || keypressed == '3' ||
                  keypressed == '4' || keypressed == '5' || keypressed == '6' || keypressed == '7' ||
                  keypressed == '8' || keypressed == '9' ) {
                tempPassword += keypressed;
                lcd.setCursor(i,1);
                lcd.print("*");
                i++;
                tone(buzzer, 2000, 100);
              }
            }
            if (i > 5 || keypressed == '#') {
              tempPassword = "";
              i=1;
              tone(buzzer, 2000, 100);
              lcd.clear();
              lcd.setCursor(0,0);
              lcd.print("Set New Password");
              lcd.setCursor(0,1);
              lcd.print(">");
            }
            if ( keypressed == '*') {
              i=1;
              tone(buzzer, 2000, 100);
              password = tempPassword;
              passChangeMode = false;
              passChanged = false;
              screenOffMsg = 0;
            }            
          }
        }
      }
    }
   }
 }
}
void enterPassword() {
  int k=5;
  tempPassword = "";
  activated = true;
  lcd.clear();
  lcd.setCursor(0,0);
  lcd.print(" *** ALARM *** ");
  lcd.setCursor(0,1);
  lcd.print("Pass>");
      while(activated) {
      keypressed = myKeypad.getKey();
      if (keypressed != NO_KEY){
        if (keypressed == '0' || keypressed == '1' || keypressed == '2' || keypressed == '3' ||
            keypressed == '4' || keypressed == '5' || keypressed == '6' || keypressed == '7' ||
            keypressed == '8' || keypressed == '9' ) {
          tempPassword += keypressed;
          lcd.setCursor(k,1);
          lcd.print("*");
          k++;
        }
      }
      if (k > 9 || keypressed == '#') {
        tempPassword = "";
        k=5;
        lcd.clear();
        lcd.setCursor(0,0);
        lcd.print(" *** ALARM *** ");
        lcd.setCursor(0,1);
        lcd.print("Pass>");
      }
      if ( keypressed == '*') {
        if ( tempPassword == password ) {
          activated = false;
          alarmActivated = false;
          noTone(buzzer);
          screenOffMsg = 0; 
        }
        else if (tempPassword != password) {
          lcd.setCursor(0,1);
          lcd.print("Wrong! Try Again");
          delay(2000);
          lcd.clear();
          lcd.setCursor(0,0);
          lcd.print(" *** ALARM *** ");
          lcd.setCursor(0,1);
          lcd.print("Pass>");
        }
      }    
    }
}
// Custom function for the Ultrasonic sensor
long getDistance(){
  //int i=10;
  
  //while( i<=10 ) {
  // Clears the trigPin
  digitalWrite(trigPin, LOW);
  delayMicroseconds(2);
  // Sets the trigPin on HIGH state for 10 micro seconds
  digitalWrite(trigPin, HIGH);
  delayMicroseconds(10);
  digitalWrite(trigPin, LOW);
  // Reads the echoPin, returns the sound wave travel time in microseconds
  duration = pulseIn(echoPin, HIGH);
  // Calculating the distance
  distance = duration*0.034/2;
  //sumDistance += distance;
  //}
  //int averageDistance= sumDistance/10;
  return distance;
}

Check the project post to know more information and to find detailed tutorial. You can also check other posts by Dejan using this link.

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@ blog.tindie.com

This quad band GSM board is claimed to be the worlds smallest of its kind. We have no way to verify this bold claim but let’s all agree that this is a pretty small board that lets you send texts and make calls. The GSM feature is an addition to the OLEDiUNO Cube range that we have mentioned previously on the blog.

Send Texts or Make Calls With This Tiny GSM Board – [Link]