Arduino Network Analyzer

Arduino_RF

Brett Killion has published his Arduino shield a Network Analyzer on an Arduino Shield which covers from 0-72MHz.

The network analyzer shield uses an Analog Devices AD9851 DDS chip clocked at 180MHz which will output a sine wave at any frequency from 0Hz and 72MHz. The DDS output is filtered with a Butterworth LPF and then passed to a two transistor amplifier. The shield will output approximately 0dBm (maybe 1-2dBm if you turn the Pot up; may get distortion, though) into 50 Ohms. The output and input connectors are SMA. The power detector is an Analog Devices AD8307. It’s inputs are terminated with a 50 Ohm load. There is no filtering on the input of the power detector so the chip is responsive from very low frequencies all the way up to 500MHz.

Arduino Network Analyzer – [Link]

DIY FPGA Programming

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TC-Engineering has documented their efforts to program a Spartan 6 FPGA using a DIY PCB. The hardware part and software are discussed on the link below.

I’ve been thinking about building stuff with FPGA’s for a while, and usually get turned away because FPGA’s are considerably harder to implement than microcontrollers since they have no on-chip memory. It is necessary to re-program the gates every time they power up, which requires an external flash memory chip. There aren’t great references online for the DIY community, so I figured I’d post how to get this working. Not using dev boards opens a world of opportunities, so I’m a proponent of not using Arduino’s and their FPGA equivalent for too long (sure, they’re good to get started with, but don’t become dependent)

DIY FPGA Programming – [Link]

Power-on Reminder with LED Lamp

Many a times equipment at workstations remains switched on unnoticed. In this situation, these may get damaged due to overheating. Here is an add-on device for the workbench power supply that reminds you of the power-on status of the connected devices every hour or so by sounding a buzzer for around 20 seconds. It also has a white LED that provides good enough light to locate objects when a main fails.

Here, IC NE555 (IC1) is wired as an astable multivibrator, whose time period is set to around six minutes using resistors R1 and R2, preset VR1 and capacitor C1 for sounding the buzzer every hour. The output of IC1 is fed to the clock input of IC CD4017 (IC2). Capacitor C3 and resistor R3 provide power-on-reset pulse to IC2. When power to the circuit is switched on, pin 3 of IC2 goes high. After around one hour, its output pin 11 (Q9) goes high and the buzzer sounds. This cycle repeats until the two npn transistors. The LDR offers a very high resistance in darkness, i.e., when no light falls on it. Therefore when power fails, transistor T1 gets reverse biased to drive transistor T2 and the white LED (LED2) glows. The lamp circuit is powered by a 9V rechargeable battery, which is charged via resistor R5 when mains is present. Thus in darkness, the LED remains power to the circuit is switched off. The automatic lamp is built around a light-dependent resistor (LDR) and ‘on.’

This project is used as reminder alerts with robust repeat scheduling, flexible snooze and full customization.

Power-on Reminder with LED Lamp – [Link]

RELATED POSTS

5A Adjustable Regulated Power Supply

5A_Adjustable_Regulated_Power_Supply_G006

This project provides a variable output voltage ranging from 1.2 to 32 V @ 5 A. Project based on LM338K IC, LM338K is adjustable 3 terminal positive voltage regulator capable of supply in excess of 5A over a 1.2V to 32V output range, simple circuit consist few components.

Features

  • Input Supply : 24 VAC or 30 VDC, 5 Amp
  • Output : variable output from 1.2 to 32 V @ 5 A regulated low ripple DC voltage
  • Heatsink for regulator IC
  • Onboard bridge rectifier to convert AC to DC
  • LED indication at input of IC
  • Thermal overload/short circuit protection (provided by IC feature)

5A Adjustable Regulated Power Supply – [Link]

Connecting HC-05 Bluetooth Module to Arduino

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TechDepot Egypt @ instructables.com has published a tutorial on how to connect a HC-05 Bluetooth module to Arduino. Turorial shows how to connect the module with Arduino and example code is included.

It is worth noting that the HC-05 power in (Vcc) uses 5V, while the transmit and receive (TXD and RXD) logic signal uses 3.3V. Accordingly sending signals from the HC-05 module to Arduino is ok as the Arduino I/O pins can safely receive up to 5V but the issue is when Arduino tries to send the data to the HC-05 with signal level 5V, in this case it is required to use a voltage divider as we will see during the tutorial.

Connecting HC-05 Bluetooth Module to Arduino – [Link]

Isolated Circuit Digitally Indicates 120-/220-V Line Voltage

IFD2631_FO

Edward K. Miguel @ electronicdesign.com has published a circuit that has output high when the votlage in input is 220V and output low when the voltage is 110V. This is often useful on motor control and power supply systems.

The circuit illustrated in the figure monitors the ac line and provides a basic output indicating whether it is at 120 V or 220 V, with the output at the transistor collector going low for 120-V and high for 220-V inputs.

Isolated Circuit Digitally Indicates 120-/220-V Line Voltage – [Link]

Dual USB Serial and I2C Converter

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Jesus Echavarria has posted a new project, a dual USB – Serial and I2C converter to communicate with serial and I2C devices.

Hi all! After a couple of months with a lot of work, I come here again with the last board I develop before Christmas. It’s a dual USB serial and I2C converter based on two MCP2221 Microchip 2.0 USB-Serial bridges. I develop it as a need on my work with the last project I’m involved. I need to monitor a serial communication between two devices. With only one converter, I must choose between RX and TX lines to monitoring the traffic.

Dual USB Serial and I2C Converter – [Link]

DC Motor Direction Controller with tact switches

DC_Motor_Direction_Controller_IMG

DC Motor Direction Control project offers direction control using digital logic gates and a DPDT relay.

Features

  • Supply input 12 VDC @ 75 mA
  • Power LED
  • DC Motor Direction LED Yellow/Green
  • Relay Output: up to 7 A
  • Onboard tactile switch for direction control
  • Relay based drive design with diode protection
  • LED indicator for direction indication
  • Power-On LED indicator
  • Terminal pins and screw terminal connector for easy input / output connection
  • Four mounting holes of 3.2 mm each
  • PCB dimensions 41 mm x 81 mm

DC Motor Direction Controller with tact switches – [Link]

ATtiny10 Mini Breakout Board

ATtiny10-MiniBreakoutBoard

Dan Watson has designed a tiny breakout board for the Atmel ATtiny10. The board includes a bypass capacitor, a power LED and a user LED:

This breakout board is for the ATtiny10 microcontroller. The PCB is 0.25×0.325″ and uses 0.050″ header pins. The board could actually be made smaller, but I ran into the minimum PCB size limit on OSHPark. Despite the tiny size, I was able to include a 100nF bypass capacitor, power LED, and a user LED on pin PB1. That pin is also the clock pin for the programming interface, so it flashed when the board is being programmed.

ATtiny10 Mini Breakout Board – [Link]

RELATED POSTS

High-band DPD Demodulator with Integrated DSA and RF Switch

The IDTF1370 is a digital pre-distortion demodulator (DPD) for power amplifiers linearization in BTS transmitter that utilize the IDT zero-distortion, and glitch-free technology that offers customers an unparalleled high-performance DPD demodulator. It utilizes the technique called pre-distortion, in digital communication it is used to improve the linearity of the transmitter performance by pre-distorting a data to counteract the distortion inherent in the power amplifier. The F1370 has an RF channel range of 1300-2900MHz, it’s IF frequency ranges 20-500MHz, a typical gain of 12.5dB, +41dBm IP3o, and a High/Low side injection. The device features an integrated DPD IC for MIMO, which eliminates the need for external IF amps, baluns, switches, and DSAs thus reduce solution cost and space significantly. It has a reduction of greater that 1-Watt power consumption compared to conventional solutions.

The device has an RF input, standby mode and attenuator setting may be set using the F1370 serial port input. It has a built-in digital step attenuator (DSA) and single-pole-double-throw switches (SP2Ts). The signal coming out of the power amplifier is receive so that the I&Q (In-phase and Quadrature) data at the Baseband can be pre-distorted before being sent to the transmitter’s digital-to-analog converter to counteract the distortion inherent in the downstream PA. The signal coupled from the PA is adjusted via a DSA to a lower level and then sub-sampled at an IF frequency of ~200 MHz which necessitates the need for a highly linear demodulator to downmix to quadrature IF from the Transmit frequency. Sampling IF_I and IF_Q independently and then digitally combining these signals can achieve an effective doubling of the sample rate. Any distortion in this path will degrade the performance of the DPD algorithm. By utilizing an ultra-linear demodulator with integrated DSA such as the IDT F1370, the ACLR and/or power consumption of the full Transmitter system can be improved significantly.

The F1370 is typically used in base station transmitter and receiver for digital pre-distortion demodulator. It is also applicable in industrial, test and measurement, broadband CATV, microwave, and wireless infrastructure and distributed antenna system.

High-band DPD Demodulator with Integrated DSA and RF Switch  – [Link]