LT8616 – Dual 42V Synchronous Monolithic Step-Down Regulator with 6.5μA Quiescent Current

 

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The LT8616 is a high efficiency dual synchronous monolithic step-down switching regulator with an input voltage range of 3.4V to 42V. Its dual channel design delivers independent 2.5A and 1.5A continuous current to outputs as low as 0.8V. A dual channel synchronous rectification topology delivers up to 95% efficiency while Burst Mode operation keeps quiescent current under 6.5μA (both channels enabled) in no-load standby conditions, making it ideal for always-on systems. Switching frequency can be programmed from 200kHz to 3MHz and is synchronizable throughout this range. The LT8616’s 35ns minimum on-time enables 16V to 1.8V step-down conversions, while switching at 2MHz helps designers avoid critical noise-sensitive frequency bands, such as AM radio while having a very compact solution footprint.

LT8616 – Dual 42V Synchronous Monolithic Step-Down Regulator with 6.5μA Quiescent Current – [Link]

4-GHz op amps achieve ultralow input bias current

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The LTC®6268-10/LTC6269-10 is a single/dual 4GHz FET-input operational amplifier with extremely low input bias current and low input capacitance. It also features low input-referred current noise and voltage noise making it an ideal choice for high speed transimpedance amplifiers, and high-impedance sensor amplifiers. It is a decompensated op amp that is gain-of-10 stable.

It operates on 3.1V to 5.25V supply and consumes 16.5mA per amplifier. A shutdown feature can be used to lower power consumption when the amplifier is not in use.

4-GHz op amps achieve ultralow input bias current – [Link]

TQFP44 Breakout Board to Dip

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This is a 44 pin TQFP to DIP breakout board. Ideal for ATmega32 and other chips with standard 0.8mm pin spacing 44-pin TQFP package. The Board is designed with Eagle Cadsoft software.

TQFP44 Breakout Board to Dip – [Link]

RELATED POSTS

PID Theory Explained

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by ni.com:

Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) control is the most common control algorithm used in industry and has been universally accepted in industrial control. The popularity of PID controllers can be attributed partly to their robust performance in a wide range of operating conditions and partly to their functional simplicity, which allows engineers to operate them in a simple, straightforward manner.

As the name suggests, PID algorithm consists of three basic coefficients; proportional, integral and derivative which are varied to get optimal response. Closed loop systems, the theory of classical PID and the effects of tuning a closed loop control system are discussed in this paper. The PID toolset in LabVIEW and the ease of use of these VIs is also discussed.

PID Theory Explained – [Link]

Nixie Tube Clock

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by Peter @ petemills.blogspot.in:

Nixie tubes are cool. They have great aesthetic appeal with their difficult-to-photograph, warm orange glow, and dem curvy numerals. They add an organic je ne sais quoi to a hobby with ostensibly digital design cues. Further, they pose technical challenges in the way of producing and switching the ~175 V DC needed to light each tube element. And as far as I am aware, there are no new nixie tubes being produced; as such, procurement can be a challenge unto itself. My N.O.S. nixies came from Russia thru Ebay, and only 3 were duds. Incidentally the seller replaced those 3, FOC.

Nixie Tube Clock – [Link]

RELATED POSTS

Logging harvested solar power using $15 Scorpion Board

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by Pieter:

It’s undeniable that South Africa is experiencing a critical electricity crisis. On the positive side, it’s forcing us to conserve and consider alternative sources of energy. My mom sponsored our household with a cheap Chinese solar panel with battery pack and LED lights to use during load shedding (we live in Cape Town zone 6 and you can find the schedule here).

This made me wonder: how much solar power does this system harvest in one day? Enter my handy $15 Scorpion Board. I built a cheap current sensor board (using a Diodes ZXCT1051 low side current sensor IC).

Logging harvested solar power using $15 Scorpion Board – [Link]

Basics of using FFT on a Tektronix TDS2000 oscilloscope

This video (by request) gives an overview of how to the FFT Math function on the Tektronix TDS2000 series oscilloscope. (same applies to the TDS1000). A brief review of FFT fundamentals is given, followed by a demonstration of using the FFT function and controls, ending with a description of the mathematical relationships between the scope settings and the FFT results. More modern scopes will have different (easier to use) controls for the FFT than this 12+ yr old scope, but it is instructive to understand the operation of this feature.

Basics of using FFT on a Tektronix TDS2000 oscilloscope – [Link]

AC Power Theory – Arduino maths

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by openenergymonitor.org:

AC Voltage and current continually alternate, as the name suggests, if we draw a picture of the voltage and current waveform over time, it will look something like the image below (depending on what’s using power – the current waveform – blue in the diagram below – is what you get if you look at a typical laptop power supply. There’s an incandescent light bulb in there as well).

The image was made by sampling the mains voltage and current at high frequency, which is exactly what we do on the emontx or Arduino. We make between 50 and a 100 measurements every 20 milliseconds. (100 if sampling only current, and 50, if sampling voltage and current – we’re limited by the Arduino analog read command and calculation speed).

AC Power Theory – Arduino maths – [Link]

Wireless Electronic Notice Board using GSM

This project demonstrates how to design a wireless electronic notice board using SST89E516RD-40-C-PIE microcontroller. The notice boards are important in public places like railway stations, parks and airports. Presently almost all electronic notice boards are designed using wired system. One of the drawbacks of the design is the system’s flexibility in terms of placement. The aim of this project is to develop a wireless notice board that can be installed in any public areas and will display the latest information sent from the user’s mobile.

The above circuit consists of Microchip Technology’s SST89E516RD-40-C-PIE microcontroller, GSM module, level converter and 16×2 LCD. The LCD is connected to P1.0 and it is used to display message. The GSM module is connected to the SST89E516RD-40-C-PIE microcontroller through the MAX232 IC. Only four data lines are required to display the data, which are connected to P1.4, P1.5, P1.6 and P1.7 respectively. In order to communicate with GSM, some AT commands are sent through the serial connection (UART Protocol). The module requires 9600-baud rate. The GSM modem is duly interfaced through level shifter IC for establishing RS232 communication protocol to the microcontroller. The message received is sent to the microcontroller that further displays it on electronic notice board, which is equipped with a LCD display. It is interfaced to a microcontroller from 8051 family duly powered by a regulated power supply.

This GSM based e-notice board has various applications used in several domains including banks, stock exchanges, traffic control, public advertisements, and educational sectors. Further development to this project can be done by providing message storage facility by non-volatile memory i.e. EEPROM attached to the microcontroller for retrieval of old messages if required. It can also be expanded to a bigger LCD screen.

Wireless Electronic Notice Board using GSM  – [Link]

Tiny audio amp produces 1.9 W from 5 V

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by elektormagazine.com:

The PAM8905 is a new audio amp chip from Diodes Incorporated measuring just 1.5 x 2.0 mm. The design operates in class D mode, achieving a total harmonic distortion of 1% (plus noise) and delivering a maximum of 1.9 W into 8 ohm using a power supply in the range between 2.8 V to 5.2 V. The PAM8905 features an integrated boost converter powering the output stage to achieve the rated output power and maintaining volume with falling battery voltage. The boost converter is a fully synchronous design, ensuring a low external component count and high efficiency.

Tiny audio amp produces 1.9 W from 5 V – [Link]