36V, 800mA Robust Linear Regulator Has Extended SOA

3089

Linear Technology Corporation announces the LT3089, a rugged 800mA wide input voltage range linear regulator with key usability, monitoring and protection features. The device has an extended safe operating area (SOA) compared to existing regulators, making it ideal for high input-to-output voltage and high output current applications where older regulators limit the output. The LT3089 uses a current source reference for single resistor output voltage settings and output adjustability down to 0V. Output current limit can be set externally with a single resistor. This regulator architecture, combined with low millivolt line and load regulation, enables multiple ICs to be paralleled easily for heat spreading and higher output current. The current from the device’s current monitor can be summed with the set current for line-drop compensation, where the output of the LT3089 increases its current to compensate for line drops.

36V, 800mA Robust Linear Regulator Has Extended SOA – [Link]

How to use the 4.3′ E-Paper display with Arduino

educ8s.tv has uploaded another tutorial on how to use a e-paper display with Arduino. Source code is provided.

Electronic paper and e-paper are display technologies that mimic the appearance of ordinary ink on paper. Unlike conventional backlit flat panel displays that emit light, electronic paper displays reflect light like paper. This make them more comfortable to read, and provide a wider viewing angle than most light-emitting displays. Many electronic paper technologies hold static text and images indefinitely without electricity.

How to use the 4.3′ E-Paper display with Arduino – [Link]

MSP430 VFD Clock

VFD_Clock

Daniel Johnson @ danielelectronics.com has build a VFD Tube Clock based on MSP430 microcontroller and explains it’s code.

I wanted to do a follow-up to my last clock build, the MSP430 Analog Gauge Clock, reusing some of the code from that project, and I had an IV-18 vacuum florescent display (VFD) tube that I bought on Ebay. Also, I wanted to finish the project before Christmas break was over. That didn’t happen. But I did manage to get the code written and most of the hardware built.

MSP430 VFD Clock – [Link]

Arduino Controlled Modular Bench Power Supply

pre-regulatorpost-regulator

Denis @ envox.hr has designed a great PSU that is reliable, modular, programmable and of course Open source. The power supply is controlled by an Arduino and a touchscreen TFT screen is used to monitor and control it. It comes with a bunch of features you can check on the link below.

The programmable bench power supply project was an attempt to create reliable, modular, open and programmable power supply that can be used for various tasks starting with powering breadboard, charge (or to some extent discharge) batteries of various types and sizes or use as a tool in school/educational and science experiments.

Arduino Controlled Modular Bench Power Supply – [Link]

How to Set Up and Program an LCD Display on an Arduino

Arduino_LCD

circuitbasics.com has a nice tutorial on how to use a common Hitachi HD44780 LCD display on Arduino. Many of the functions available are discussed and shown in examples.

In this tutorial, I will explain how to set up an LCD display on an Arduino, and show you (with examples) all of the functions available to program it. The display I will be using here is a 16×2 LCD display that I bought for under $10 on Amazon. They can be very useful in projects that output data, and will make your project look a lot more interesting.

How to Set Up and Program an LCD Display on an Arduino – [Link]

Soil Moisture Sensor with SD logging

FB0O74GIK8KSP3E.MEDIUM

WojciechM3 @ instructables.com has build an Arduino based soil moisture sensor with character LCD, real time clock and SD card logging.

It can be very helpful with a master degree biotechnology/biology/botanics works, however remember that kind of a project can be only add as a bonus as it is in my Master thesis. Good luck with building it!

Soil Moisture Sensor with SD logging – [Link]

5V Symmetrical Regulated Power Supply

5V_Power_Supply_G003

This Project provides Positive and Negative (Dual Output) 5 V @ 1 A Regulated Power Supply.

Specifications

  • Input 7-0-7 VAC to 12-0-12 VAC or +/- 9 to 18 VDC
  • Output : Dual output ± 5 V @ 1 A regulated low ripple DC voltage
  • Heat-sink for regulator ICs
  • Onboard bridge rectifier to convert AC to DC
  • LED indication for both the outputs
  • Thermal overload/short circuit protection (provided by IC feature)
  • Screw terminal connector for easy input and output connection
  • Filter capacitors for low ripple DC output
  • Four mounting holes of 3.2 mm each
  • PCB dimensions 46 mm x 60 mm

5V Symmetrical Regulated Power Supply – [Link]

Arduino 101 Fundamentals

FAQLWPGIK2V19Y4.MEDIUM

eliesalame @ instructables.com has written an introduction course to programming Arduino. It is focused on those who just starting now in the Arduino world.

It is meant to be a beginners guide that includes detailed explanation about the basic statements and functions. Most of the sketches I use are taken from the Arduino IDE for their simplicity. I wrote this guide when I first started working with Arduino as a way to help me code easier.

Arduino 101 Fundamentals – [Link]

Wearable WiFi Detector


A WiFi (Wireless Fidelity) is a technology that uses the 2.4GHz UHF and 5GHz SHF ISM radio bands to allow devices such as computers, smartphones, digital cameras, tablet computers, etc. to network. Nowadays the WiFi technology is being used by cities to provide free or low-cost Internet access to residents. The WiFi is inexpensive and is easy to setup but it is also unobtrusive. The people may not know that they are in a hotspot unless they open their smartphones or tablets and stream movies on it.

This reference design is a simple circuit that helps WiFi users determine if there is a hotspot nearby. The circuit uses a WiFi chip, a crystal, an SPI flash and some other external components to detect if there is a WiFi network available within the area. The WiFi chip is programmed to spot wireless networks and display the result on a small light emitting diode (LED) connected to one of the GPIO pins of the WiFi chip. The LED will just keep on blinking if there is no wireless network available within the area. As soon as the WiFi chip detects a network, the LED will stop blinking and become steady.

The prototype of this circuit must be in small size so that it is wearable. The WiFi chip and the LED with the battery can be soldered into two different PCBs to make the prototype smaller. The TE Connectivity 87220-8 male and 5-534237-6 female header then connects the WiFi and the LED PCBs. The WiFi chip only consumes small power especially when it is in standby mode. But to conserve power when it is not used, the user can turn OFF the WiFi detector using the TE Connectivity MLL1200S slide switch.

Wearable WiFi Detector – [Link]