Simple Infrared PWM on Arduino

56kHz-50-percent

by analysir.com:

We are often asked on discussion boards, about conflicts between IRremote or IRLib and other Arduino Libraries. In this post, we present a sketch for ‘Simple Infrared PWM on Arduino’. This is the first part in a 3 part series of posts. Part 1 shows how to generate the simple Infrared carrier frequency on Arduino, using any available IO pin and without conflicting with other libraries. Part 2 will show how to send a RAW infrared signal using this approach and Part 3 will show how to send a common NEC signal from the binary or HEX value.

Simple Infrared PWM on Arduino – [Link]

DIY WMRP-Solder Station

IMG_20150412_134210

Features:

  • low offset op amp for soldering tip temperature measurement with type c thermocouple
  • cold junction compensation using the PTC (KTY82-210) included in the WMRP soldering pencil
  • input voltage measurement (for use with 3 cell lipo battery)
  • soldering pencil current measurement
  • recognizing if the soldering pencil rests in the stand (–> standby)
  • 3 buttons for save and recall temperature values
  • rotary encoder to set soldering temperature
  • illuminated 16×2 character LCD module
  • USB for debugging and firmware update
  • clean and small enclosure
  • 4mm safety

DIY WMRP-Solder Station – [Link]

TPS61093-Q1 Low Input Boost Converter With Integrated Power Diode

typ_app_lvs992

The TPS61093-Q1 is a 1.2-MHz, fixed-frequency boost converter designed for high integration and high reliability. The IC integrates a 20-V power switch, input/output isolation switch, and power diode. When the output current exceeds the overload limit, the isolation switch of the IC opens up to disconnect the output from the input. This disconnection protects the IC and the input supply. The isolation switch also disconnects the output from the input during shut down to minimize leakage current. When the IC is shutdown, the output capacitor is discharged to a low voltage level by internal diodes. Other protection features include 1.1-A peak overcurrent protection (OCP) at each cycle, output overvoltage protection (OVP), thermal shutdown, and undervoltage lockout (UVLO).

TPS61093-Q1 Low Input Boost Converter With Integrated Power Diode – [Link]

See-through solar concentrator harvests energy from sunlight

transparent-solar-cell

by Amy Norcross @ edn.com:

A team of Michigan State University (MSU) researchers has created a transparent solar concentrator able to turn any window (or other sheet of glass, such as the screen for a smartphone) into a photovoltaic solar cell. What makes this development different? The panel is truly transparent.

Earlier attempts at building transparent solar cells resulted in panels with tinted glass and/or compromised visibility. Lead researcher Richard Lunt, an assistant professor of chemical engineering and materials science at MSU, says, “No one wants to sit behind colored glass. It makes for a very colorful environment, like working in a disco.”

See-through solar concentrator harvests energy from sunlight – [Link]

Marquardt 1841 – above standard classics

obr1572_1

Pleasant actuation characteristics and reliable features of a push button switch Marquardt series 1840 make it attractive for all applications where you require control by a push.

Classic push-button switches are favorite for many decades, maybe also because they´re well known already from the beginnings of electronics. Probably, a nostalgia is not the only reason making them popular, but mainly an easy control, when even an unacquainted person knows, that it´s something “what has to be pushed” to change a status of an electric device.

Exactly a term “to change a status” is important, because at these switches it´s not possible (or not easily visible), whether it´s switched on or off. Though it´s true, that the majority of such switches is a little bit pushed down (lowered) in a switched on status, but the difference is often small. That´s why these switches are not suitable for applications, where from safety reasons it´s necessary to know tha status of the switch before connecting to a mains line.

Marquardt 1840 series switches are available as single-pole switches – 1841 (momentary, SPST), two-pole switches – 1842 and single-pole changeover switches – 1843 (SPDT). Directly from our stock we offer you momentary switches ) 1841.1201 (SPNO) and 1841.1301 (SPNC).
Series 1840 (SPNC) belongs to a top in this segment and offers a really pleasant control and a quality switching system with a mechanical endurance of min. 100 000 cycles. 6A/ 250V is far sufficient for many applications and assembly is simple – by means of an M12 nut supplied. An interesting supplement is also a neoprene cap integrated with an M12 nut, enabling to gain a considerable resistance to water and dust. Also available are 2-pole versions – 1842 and also versions functioning as a push-button (momentary).

There are 2 nuts supplied. One is “regular” – hexagonal and the other one is a round type intended to be used as a top cover on a front panel. Further detailed information will provide you the Marquardt 1840 datasheet.

Marquardt 1841 – above standard classics – [Link]

Increasing Outputs from a Clock Source

ADF4351

In digital electronics, fan-out is defined as the number of gate inputs that the output of a single logic gate can feed. It is very important in digital systems for a single logic gate to drive other gates or devices. In this case, a buffer can be used between the logic gate and the devices it will drive. Clock buffer is also called as fan-out buffer. The IDT clock buffer clock divider and clock multiplexer portfolio includes devices with up to 27 outputs. Differential outputs such as LVPECL, LVDS, HCSL, CML, HSTL, as well as selectable outputs, are supported for output frequencies up to 3.2 GHz and single-ended LVCMOS outputs for frequencies up to 350MHz.

Modern digital systems often require many high quality clocks at logic levels that are different from the logic level of the clock source. Extra buffering may be required to guarantee accurate distribution to other circuit components without loss of integrity. Many systems require low jitter multiple system clocks for mixed signal processing and timing. The circuit shown in interfaces the ADF4351 integrated phase-locked loop (PLL) and voltage-controlled oscillator (VCO) to the ADCLK948, which provides up to eight low voltage differential signaling (LVDS) outputs from one differential output of the IDT 8SLVD1208-33. The IDT8SLVD1208-33I is characterized to operate from a 3.3V power supply. Guaranteed output-to-output and part-to-part skew characteristics make the IDT8SLVD1208-33I ideal for those clock distribution applications demanding well-defined performance and repeatability. Two selectable differential inputs and eight low skew outputs are available. The integrated bias voltage reference enables easy interfacing of single-ended signals to the device inputs. The device is optimized for low power consumption and low additive phase noise.

Fan-out buffers and clock dividers are general-purpose clock building block devices that can be used in any number of applications. They are ideal for clock and signal distribution in a large variety of systems, from personal computers to consumer electronics or industrial systems, as well as high-performance networking and communications systems.

Increasing Outputs from a Clock Source – [Link]

An introduction to sensors

Sensors Experiments

PyroEDU began in 2012 with the mission of offering free online courses teaching the fundamentals of electrical engineering in an approachable and entertaining manner. Rather than studying textbooks and advanced mathematics, students are taught using a learn-by-doing approach that follows four basic steps: introduce the topic, explain the theory, build an experiment to demonstrate the theory, and offer real-world examples to demonstrate how the topic is utilized today. Students can interact with other students and the instructor via the PyroEDU forums or by joining one of PyroEDU’s hosted classrooms on uReddit or P2PU.

PyroEDU is currently teaching its sixth course, An Introduction to Sensors, covering a wide variety of sensors from motion detectors to temperature sensors. This sixth course is the capstone in the Introductory Series of courses PyroEDU offers (visit http://www.pyroelectro.com/edu/ for a complete listing of courses in the Introductory Series). Working with The Gadgetory, an online electronics retailer, PyroEDU will be offering a comprehensive kit that includes all the parts necessary to complete the Introductory Series of courses. More advanced series are planned in the future which may include courses in animatronics and robotics.

An introduction to sensors – [Link]

 

Arduino DMX 512 Tester/Controller

Hardware v00

daniel3514 writes:

A tool to control and test light show controlled by the protocol DMX-512, ideal for quick tests on fixed or temporary installations of lighting. This project arises from the need to have a portable system for rapid testing in lighting installations, without the need to install lighting consoles, interfaces or computers in environments outside, hostile or difficult to access.

Arduino DMX 512 Tester/Controller – [Link]

CHIP – The World’s First Nine Dollar Computer

chip

C.H.I.P. is a computer. It’s tiny and easy to use.

C.H.I.P. does computer things. Work in LibreOffice and save your documents to C.H.I.P.’s onboard storage. Surf the web and check your email over wifi. Play games with a bluetooth controller. With dozens of applications and tools preinstalled, C.H.I.P. is ready to do computer things the moment you power it on.

C.H.I.P. is a computer for students, teachers, grandparents, children, artists, makers, hackers, and inventors. Everyone really. C.H.I.P. is a great way to add a computer to your life and the perfect way to power your computer based projects.

CHIP – The World’s First Nine Dollar Computer – [Link]