How to measure temperature very accurately with an Arduino

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This project shows how to measure temperature data from a TSYS01 Temperature Sensor board using Arduino:

While studying in university we were challenged as part of a course work into designing a box with very accurate temperature control. If the project were to succeed, multiple boxes were to be built and used in a research project studying the effect of surface material on the perceived temperature of flooring and other building materials.

How to measure temperature very accurately with an Arduino – [Link]

Sensing current on the high side

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Michael Dunn@ edn.com discuss about current sense on the high side of power source.

At their heart, the majority of DC current sense circuits start with a resistance in a supply line (though magnetic field sensing is a good alternative, especially in higher-current scenarios). One simply measures the voltage drop across the resistor and scales it as desired to read current (E = I × R (if I didn’t include this, someone would complain)). If the sense resistor is in the ground leg, then the solution is a simple op-amp circuit. Everything stays referenced to ground, and you only have to be careful about small voltage drops in the ground layout.

Sensing current on the high side – [Link]

Eagle CAD Tips and Tricks Part 2

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This is the second and final article of the Eagle Tips from allaboutcircuits.com:

Before searching on the internet for new libraries to add to Eagle, first make sure that your device does not already exist in your local libraries. To check, use a search pattern that includes ‘*’.

For example, if you want to add a 7805 5v regulator, you must search for *7805* instead of 7805. This will search for any part with 7805 in the middle of the name, without regard for the beginning or end of the part name.

Eagle CAD Tips and Tricks Part 2 – [Link]

Egg Memristor recipe (serves one)

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by Clemens Valens @ elektormagazine.com discuss about a new type of dissolvable memory resistor using egg proteins.

Over the past years research has been done with several biodegradable materials, including DNA, to make what is called transient electronics, dissolvable electronic components that are designed to be compatible with the environment. The Chinese scientists used egg proteins, magnesium and tungsten to build a dissolvable memory resistor or memristor, a special kind of resistor that can “remember” charges.

Egg Memristor recipe (serves one) – [Link]

5V Step Down DC-DC Converter

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The Tiny Step-Down DC-DC converter project provides 5V 500mA output from supply input up to 25V DC. MC34063A IC is heart of the project from on semiconductor. The MC33063A is a monolithic control circuit containing the primary functions required for DC-DC converters, This device consist of an internal temperature compensated reference, comparator, controlled duty cycle oscillator with an active current limit circuit, driver and high current output switch. This IC specially designed to be incorporated step-down, step-up, and voltage-inverting applications with minimum number of external components.

Features

  • Input 12- 25V
  • Output 5V, 500mA
  • Output filter for clean output
  • Output Voltage Fine Adjustable 20%
  • Header Connector for Output/Input Connections
  • Low Standby Current
5V Step Down DC-DC Converter – [Link]

ATtiny85 Boost Converter

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GreatScottLab @ instructables.com build a step up dc-dc converter with the help of ATtiny85 microcontroller.

In this project I will show you an efficient and common way how to step up DC voltages. I will also demonstrate how easy it can be to build a boost converter with the help of an ATtiny85. Let’s get started!

ATtiny85 Boost Converter – [Link]

WeMOS D1 ESP8266 vs Arduino Uno, Arduino Due and Teensy 3.2. Which one is the fastest board?

educ8s.tv uploaded a new video comparing the performance of ESP8266 Arduino board with the most popular Arduino boards.

In this video we are going to compare the computational speed of the WeMOS D1 ESP8266 based Arduino compatible board with the computational speed of the most popular Arduino boards and the Teensy 3.2. Let’s get started!

A few weeks ago, in a similar video we compared the performance of the Teensy with the most popular Arduino boards. Today, we are going to add another board to the comparison, the WeMOS D1 ESP8266 Arduino compatible board. I have prepared a detailed tutorial on that board so you can check it out before we start.

In order to compare the processing power of the boards, all the boards, the Arduino Uno, the Arduino Due, a Teensy 3.2 and the WeMOS D1 will run the same sketch. The Newton’s approximation of PI for half a million iterations. The time needed to execute this task is then displayed on a 1.8” Color TFT display. This way we are going to have a visual representation of the speed differences of the boards. In order to see how to connect the display with the Teensy or the Arduino boards check out the tutorial I have prepared on that. You can find links for all the parts in the description of the video.

WeMOS D1 ESP8266 vs Arduino Uno, Arduino Due and Teensy 3.2. Which one is the fastest board? –  [Link]

Prototype to production: Arduino for the professional

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Jacob Beningo @ edn.com discuss how you can benefit from the Arduino platform if you are a professional.

Despite its popularity among hobbyists and electronics enthusiasts, the Arduino has become infamous among professional embedded systems developers. I must admit that for the longest time I also viewed the Arduino as so simple it was nearly useless for professional developers. But I have changed my mind

Prototype to production: Arduino for the professional – [Link]