Using Python with Arduino



This series of lessons will teach you how to take your Arduino projects to the next level by having the Arduino interact with the Python programming language. Python is a free program you can download. Since you have already learned the fundamentals of programming through our first 20 Arduino lessons, learning Python will be a snap!

Using Python with Arduino – [Link]

2 New Families from Microchip



Microchip has introduced two new 8-bit MCU families with integrated Core Independent Peripherals (CIPs). You may be thinking that 8-bit processors are unlikely to cut the mustard for many of today’s applications but built-in interconnected CIPs combine to perform functions autonomously, without intervention from the processor. This makes these new 8-bit families suitable for a much broader range of applications. Functions are deterministically and reliably performed in hardware instead of software so the system performance is much better than you could otherwise expect from a typical 8-bit MCU. 8-bit architecture also leads to a simpler system design and reduced memory costs.

2 New Families from Microchip – [Link]

Engine and Steering Wheel Automotive Networking Protocol

An automobile plays an important role in a community. Aside from being a major option for transport, automobile also saves life, which is designed to give support in medications and hospitalizations. These machines are now embedded with electronic technology in which this advancement brings security and convenience to people. The engine and the steering wheel are major parts, which made an automobile useful in transportation. This design features the benefits of a FlexRay to automotive networking protocol. It is capable of 1Mbps to 10Mbps communications system. It has high ESD protection, excellent EMC performance, improved power-on reset concept, improved ElectroMagnetic Emission (EME), support of 60ns minimum bit time, and improved bus error detection functionality. It also monitors system performance using dedicated error and status information that is readable by any microcontroller.

The design is comprised of a TJA1080A transceiver, which is the main component of the system. It provides the interface between the protocol controller or MCU and the physical bus. The chokes serve as a protection from high frequency spikes that flow through the network bus. The 1N4007 diode manages the correct polarity of current and voltages to the FlexRay transceiver. The capacitors stabilize the supplies while the resistors are used for pull-ups and current limiter components.

The design is applicable to different parts of automobile in which it can serve as a backbone of the automotive network communications. Aside from automotive application, it is also applicable to other types of machineries that require real-time status of engines and gears. It is also suitable for further development in automotive application that additional parameters to be considered are expected

Engine and Steering Wheel Automotive Networking Protocol – [Link]

Buck converter is pin-programmable


by Susan Nordyk @

Housed in a tiny 3×3-mm QFN package, the MIC24046-H synchronous step-down regulator from Micrel offers efficiency of greater than 90% peak and pin-selectable output voltage, switching frequency, and current limit. A wide input voltage range of 4.5 V to 19 V makes the part useful for distributed 12-V point-of-load applications.

The switching frequency of the MIC24046-H can be programmed to one of three options: 400 kHz, 565 kHz, or 790 kHz. Programmable output-voltage choices include 0.7 V, 0.8 V, 0.9 V, 1.0 V, 1.2 V, 1.5 V, 1.8 V, 2.5 V, and 3.3 V, while an internal divider is used to achieve ±1% voltage-output accuracy. The current limit of the regulator can be programmed to 3 A, 4 A, or 5 A.

Buck converter is pin-programmable – [Link]

2A, 70V SEPIC/Boost DC/DC converter with 7µA Iq


by Graham Prophet @

LT8494 is a current mode, fixed frequency SEPIC/boost DC/DC converter with an internal 2A, 70V switch. Quiescent current of 7µA suits the device for always-on automotive or other industrial battery powered systems.

The LT8494 starts up from an input voltage range of 2.5V to 32V and once running it operates from inputs from 1V to 60V, making it suitable for applications with input sources ranging from a single-cell Li-Ion to automotive inputs. The LT8494 can be configured as a boost, SEPIC or flyback converter. Its switching frequency can be programmed via a single resistor to between 250 kHz and 1.5 MHz, enabling designers to minimise external component sizes. The combination of a thermally enhanced TSSOP-20E or 4 x 4 mm QFN package and small externals ensures a very compact footprint.

2A, 70V SEPIC/Boost DC/DC converter with 7µA Iq – [Link]

A low-cost 0.5A 33V LED driver module with 90+% efficiency

LG-LED-150702-DF-Futuro Low-cost LED driver Design FigA

by Valentin Kulikov @

This article describes simple constant current driver module with fast PWM input that can be used for driving medium and high power LEDs. The module uses an integrated constant-current output, DC-DC buck converter with output current configurable from 0.1 to 0.5A. This article outlines the schematic, design guidelines, operation, and performance of the low cost LED driver.

A low-cost 0.5A 33V LED driver module with 90+% efficiency – [Link]

Programmable 8-character LCD module and digital voltmeter


A programmable 8-character LCD module and digital voltmeter project from Tuxgraphics:

Our 3 digit LED digital voltmeter module has been quite successful over the years. This new LCD module is basically an advanced version with a lot more capabilities. You can power it with the same voltage source that your signal is derived from. You can load your own code into this module but it has even some nice features for people who just need a voltmeter module and don’t want to play with C-code.

Programmable 8-character LCD module and digital voltmeter – [Link]

Site enables detailed component comparisons


by Sagar Savant @

Choosing components is a series of time-consuming tasks, from surveying the market for possible candidates to properly evaluating performance. As a hardware engineer who has worked in Silicon Valley for 10 years, I have spent significant time developing test plans and specs, building fixtures, and testing components. One of the reasons comparing components takes a long time is because you can’t always rely on datasheets to give you the information you need. The problem with datasheets is that they only tell you the story the vendor of the component wants. If an IC characteristic is better under specific conditions, you can be sure the vendor will showcase their components under those conditions.

Site enables detailed component comparisons – [Link]

Do you know, what´s a top-class programmable power supply capable of?


If you need to simulate overvoltage, slow start, fluctuations and other situations, which may occur in real life, then the TDK Lambda power supplies won´t disappoint you.

Imagine a laboratory (testing) power supply able to provide a virtually any function. Switching on, drop-out, repeated switch-on and many other functions, by which we can test our product in a „single shot“ – those are programmable laboratory power supplies from company TDK Lambda. Perhaps the biggest advantage of programmable power supply is the fact, that there´s no need to adjust, watch, set at testing itself. It´s obvious that this sophisticated device is feelingly more expensive than usual laboratory power supplies, however it´s able to bring enormous time savings and reliability into your work.
In majority of cases it´s possible to reach simulation of a real-life voltage fluctuations, dropouts, disturbances,… This „dynamic“ testing is also able to discover the risk of „freezing“ of your product (undervoltage lockout) at a short-time undervoltage..

Company TDK Lambda belongs to the very top in this segment and its devices provide a literally unlimited possibilities of usage, configuration and control. Whether it´s extremely fast response, possibility of a parallel operation of several units, control over LAN,USB, RS485, GPIB,… almost all possibilities and options known in this field can be found in the TDK Lambda power supplies.

Main series:

  • Z+ (200-800W) – extraordinarily low and compact series. Arbitrary functions generator with 16 bit resolution (+ inner memory), max. output voltage 10-650 VDC. RS232/485, USB and analogue interface. Active PFC (typically 0,99). Advanced parallel master/slave mode.
  • ZUP (200-800W) – max. out voltage 6-120V, max 132A. CC/CV, software calibration, last setting memory, active PFC. RS232/485 and analogue interface.
  • GENESYS (750-15000W) – extraordinary reliability and power. Max 650V, max 1000A. Auto-restart or safe start (user selectable). Last setting memory, available in four sizes – GENH, GEN 1U, GEN 2U and GEN 3U. Optional USB or LAN interface and further accessories.

Possibilities of power supplies are really extensive what´s illustrated in enclosed pictures. Detailed information will provide you the catalogue of programmable laboratory power supplies as well as in the TDK Lambda powers supplies and DC-DC converters brochure.

We´re able to supply you TDK Lambda products within 4-12 weeks at advantageous conditions.

Do you know, what´s a top-class programmable power supply capable of? – [Link]

Environmental Alert System


by Aleator777:

What’s that smell? It’s noxious gas of course! If you’re in an environment where there’s a possibility of gaseous release of which you’d rather not breathe, why not build an automatic system for sensing and alerting you? The design for the Environmental Alert System is driven by my motivation to understand the concentrations of different chemicals in the air. The unit consists of an array of four gas sensors (one each for methane, propane, carbon monoxide, and smoke) connected to an Intel Edison for wireless detection and alerting. While no substitute for a proper commercial chemical detection system, the EAS makes for a great weekend project!

Environmental Alert System – [Link]