How to implement auto-brightness adjustment to seven segment LED displays

Raj from Embedded Lab shows in his latest tutorial guide how to implement adaptive brightness control to seven segment LED displays for optimum readability in all illumination conditions. The technique has been demonstrated by constructing a temperature and humidity meter that adapts the brightness of the seven segment LED displays to the surrounding lighting conditions.The project uses a general purpose LDR to sense the surrounding illumination and MAX7219 to drive the LED display.

How to implement auto-brightness adjustment to seven segment LED displays – [Link]

 

SMT Manufacturing @ The Adafruit Learning System

www.adafruit.com writes:

SMT Manufacturing @ The Adafruit Learning System. Here are a bunch of tutorials for manufacturing small to medium scale (10 – 10,000) piece surface mount electronics. From solder paste storage to Microscope Inspection.

SMT Manufacturing @ The Adafruit Learning System – [Link]

How a Microwave Oven Works

engineerguyvideo writes: [via]

Bill details how a microwave oven heats food. He describes how the microwave vacuum tube, called a magnetron, generates radio frequencies that cause the water in food to rotate back and forth. He shows the standing wave inside the oven, and notes how you can measure the wavelength with melted cheese. He concludes by describing how a magnetron generates radio waves.

How a Microwave Oven Works – [Link]

Reducing power consumption of a raspberry Pi

Reducing power consumption of a raspberry Pi – BitWizard WIKI – [via]

The Raspberry Pi relies on a linear regulator for its 3V3 rail. This dissipates a third of the energy as heat, which is a bit of a waste, if you want to power your Pi from an battery. Our solution: Replace the linear regulator with a $2 switching regulator from ebay. We also used another regulator for the 5V power, to test powering a Pi from a car battery.

Reducing power consumption of a raspberry Pi – [Link]

Low cost Ethernet shield with ENC28J60

One of the most interesting shield that you can mount on the Arduino platform is certainly the ethernet shield, because enable numerous networking applications such as remote control of systems and users, web access and publication of data, and more yet, the simplicity of finding and integrating open-source libraries on Arduino IDE does the rest. The usefulness of LAN connectivity has meant that the market would respond by offering different ethernet shield, first of all the original Arduino Ethernet Shield, which was accompanied by the good shield by Seeed Studio, both of these circuits are based on the chipset WIZnet W5100, allow multiple socket connections and can work at 100 Mbps

Low cost Ethernet shield with ENC28J60 – [Link]

LTC3605A – 20V, 5A Synchronous Step-Down Regulator

The LTC®3605A is a high efficiency, monolithic synchronous buck regulator using a phase lockable controlled on-time constant frequency, current mode architecture. PolyPhase operation allows multiple LTC3605A regulators to run out of phase while using minimal input and output capacitance. The operating supply voltage range is from 20V down to 4V, making it suitable for dual, triple or quadruple lithium-ion battery inputs as well as point of load power supply applications from a 12V or 5V rail.

LTC3605A – 20V, 5A Synchronous Step-Down Regulator – [Link]

RFID all inclusive – implement RFID quickly and simply

Compact RFID modules ID12 and ID20 can be marked by right as simple to use and reliable RFID components working with 125 kHz frequency.

Both types contain an internal antenna, thus eliminating the need of its design, production and tuning of a resonant circuit. Further, modules ID12 and ID20 contain all necessary circuitry, that´s why to produce a working RFID device, it is only necessary to connect these modules to a control unit – most often to a microcontroller. It can be said, that ID12 and ID20 represent a ready-to-use solution for a very affordable price.

If you take a look at the ID12/ID20 application circuit, you´ll find it extremely simple and also the same for both types. The main difference for both types is the range – ID12 has a 12+cm range and ID20 has 16+ cm. Corresponding to their range, has ID12 smaller dimensions and a lower power consumption than ID20.

In case, that you prefer an external antenna, you can use the ID2, module delivered with a wire-wound antenna, which only needs to be suitably placed and connected to the module. For some applications also the version of ID12 with an USB interface can be convenient – ID2-ID12USB, which can be connected directly to a PC. In case, you prefer Mifare RFID (13,56 MHz), you can use the ID20MFIA module.

Detailed information will provide you the ID2-ID20, ID12USB and ID20MFIA datasheets.

RFID all inclusive – implement RFID quickly and simply – [Link]

Arduino Leonardo versus Uno – What's New

The Arduino team is now shipping their latest creation – the Leonardo. It is the first Arduino to use Atmelʼs ATmegaXU4 series chip with built-in USB. This change is big and it has big benefits. In addition to the built-in USB, it offers more digital and analog pins. This comprehensive guide gives you the details you need to know to start using it – pinout differences, hardware capabilities, new software libraries and more.

Arduino Leonardo versus Uno – What’s New – [Link]

Arduino Leonardo versus Uno – What’s New

The Arduino team is now shipping their latest creation – the Leonardo. It is the first Arduino to use Atmelʼs ATmegaXU4 series chip with built-in USB. This change is big and it has big benefits. In addition to the built-in USB, it offers more digital and analog pins. This comprehensive guide gives you the details you need to know to start using it – pinout differences, hardware capabilities, new software libraries and more.

Arduino Leonardo versus Uno – What’s New – [Link]

Interfacing Maxim OneWire (1-Wire) devices DS18B20 on TI Launchpad MSP-EXP430G2

Maxims proprietary one wire devices have been popular with hobbyist for a long time. The small and incredibly accurate (for hobbist) DS18B20 and DS18S20 series of temperature sensors from this family of devices have been used on many platforms.

I too have used this temperature sensor, DS18B20 in particular in some of my hobby projects. But on all occasions the code routines that I used to interface the sensors, had been the hard-work of somebody else. However that did not matter as it solved my immediate purpose then. Comprehensive and easy to use routines are available for AVR, PICs and the Arduino Community so why rack your brains!

Interfacing Maxim OneWire (1-Wire) devices DS18B20 on TI Launchpad MSP-EXP430G2 – [Link]