uLCD43(GFX) – Intelligent 4.3″ display module with PICASO-GFX2 processor

The μLCD43(GFX) is an intelligent graphics display that harnesses the power to deliver a diverse range of features in a single, compact cost effective unit. Embedded at the heart of the design is the PICASO-GFX2 processor, which is driven by a highly optimized virtual core engine; EVE (Extensible Virtual Engine).

An extensive range of hardware and software peripherals have been integrated into the design, to give the user freedom to adapt the module to suit almost any application. Features include; a 4.3” TFT 480×272 touch screen display, audio, micro-SD card connector, an expansion port along with a series of GPIO, I2C pins and serial comms. The μLCD43(GFX) serves as the perfect solution to be deployed at the forefront of any product design, requiring a brilliance of colour, animation or images on a 4.3’’ widescreen display.

SPECIAL OFFER

Purchase μLCD43(GFX) and get 10% off when you enter the code “ELAB2012” during checkout. To buy visit 4DSystems e-shop

 

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ByteBlasterMV FPGA Programmer

chris @ pyroelectro.com writes:

If you dabble at all with building your own circuits with CPLD or FPGA devices then you have likely used a JTAG programmer made by Altera or Xilinx. While these programmers are essential for getting your FPGA designs onto the chip, they are horribly expensive and not practical for any electronics hobbyist. But don’t despair, we can actually make one DIY style for less than $10!

This article will show you how to use standard electronics parts easily purchased at any electronics store to build your very own Altera FPGA and CPLD device programmer. The programmer will work flawlessly with Altera’s Quartus II software and take less than an hour to build.

ByteBlasterMV FPGA Programmer – [Link]

High Current, High Brightness LEDs Simplify Power Supply Solutions

Steven Keeping writes:

LEDs for mainstream lighting are much brighter and are capable of being driven at higher drive currents than the devices of just a few years ago. That means fewer chips are needed for lighting fixtures (luminaires) taking the pressure off designers who previously had to come up with complex power units (“drivers

3,600,000 F – The Hottest Thing on Earth

With the help of the most powerful X-ray laser in the world researchers of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy have heated a piece of aluminum to a temperature of two million degrees Celsius (3.6 million degrees Fahrenheit). They also managed to verify the temperature achieved. This work could be an important step to a better understanding of nuclear fusion processes that go on in the cores of stars and giant planets like Jupiter. [via]

3,600,000 F – The Hottest Thing on Earth – [Link]

PowerXR – Programmable switching regulator

PowerXR Programmable Power Solutions

A range of serial (I2C) programmable step-down regulators for complex systems with multiple supply voltages.

  • 3 or 4 completely independent PWM channels.
  • One 3.3/5 V selectable linear LDO regulator.
  • Programmable output voltage from 0.9 to 5.1 V.
  • Programmable switch frequencies from 0.3 to 1.5 MHz.
  • Up to 6 configurable GPIO pins.
  • PowerArchitect™ » Free development software.

PowerXR – Programmable switching regulator – [Link]

Arduino WiFi RGB Lamp

open-electronics.org writes:

We create an application based on Arduino, that allows you to control brightness and color of a RGB strip LED via local network or Internet through a WiFi or Ethernet shield. The system that we propose is based on the Arduino UNO, on which are mounted two shield: the Ethernet or WIFI Shield, which provides the connection to LAN, and the RGB shield which mounts three power drivers to control the LED strip.

Arduino WiFi RGB Lamp – [Link]

LED Fade in / Fade out

diy.viktak.com writes:

I found a small project at another site about fading an LED in and out smoothly, without a microcontroller. I changed it a bit. In my version I removed one of the transistors and changed some resistor values. This is supposed to result in lower costs and smaller footprint. I know it’s a very small difference, but still.

LED Fade in / Fade out – [Link]

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Dual PIC Thermometer

diy.viktak.com writes:

The geek inside me has always wanted a fridge that shows the inside temperature for both the freezer and the fridge compartments. However, when we recently replaced our very old fridge we ended up getting a new one without the built in thermometer. So I decided that one of my next projects would have to rectify this problem.

Dual PIC Thermometer – [Link]

Door Activated LED Lighting using Hall Effect Sensors

woody1189 writes:

I’ve been meaning to make something cool for my dorm room this coming semester and decided that some custom closet lights would look great. In this Instructable, I’ll show you how to make some nice-looking LED lights that will turn on automatically using a hall effect sensor and a magnet.

Edit: I’ve noticed a lot of people are hating on the excessive control used in this project so I just wanted to clarify a few things:

  1. This instructable was also meant to be a lite introduction to actual AVR programming for those people who are used to only Arduino programming. I had a bit of trouble finding useful information when I was learning so I figured it would be nice to help out some others. That is why I posted the basic tutorials along with my AVR code.
  2. Yes I’m aware I could have simply used a reed switch to switch the LEDs when the door opened and closed. I wanted to leave room open for myself to add different light modes, maybe using more wires and pins to create nice fading effects, possibly a remote control sensor, and maybe even an auto-shutoff routine.

Door Activated LED Lighting using Hall Effect Sensors – [Link]

Analog IN-13 bargraph Nixie tube thermometer

z097dsa writes:

This is a project for a Russian IN-13 bargraph Nixie tube to use it as an indoor room thermometer. It is named “NixieTherm” and is also available as a fully complete kit incl. enclosure as shown at www.Nixiekits.eu

The IN-13 is a special construct of a gas discharge Neon display and works similar to the well know Neon bulb in illuminated mains power switches or as Nixie tubes. But this bargraph has a current depending length of the glow. As all other cold discharge tubes also the IN-13 needs a “little bit more” high voltage to work; at least 120VDC. The current through the tube must be limited, normally with a resistor. In the NixieTherm this is done with a high voltage transistor, as we need a variable current from 0….4.5mA.

Analog IN-13 bargraph Nixie tube thermometer – [Link]

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