Using Photoshop to create a realistic PCB image

www.madwizard.org writes:

When designing PCBs that will be produced professionally (or even if you etch yourself) it is sometimes hard to get a good view of what they will look like. Most CAD programs view the design in a way that is useful during design but that is not what they will look like in the end. Some provide a view mode or 3D rendering option to get a good idea, but at least CadSoft Eagle does not. What if you want to view what your design will look like or if you just want a fancy graphic to show off your wonderful PCB? Photoshop comes to the rescue.

Using Photoshop to create a realistic PCB image – [Link]

mikroProg for PIC has been redisigned

tehnikservice.net writes:

 

mikroProg™ for PIC®, dsPIC® and PIC32® website has been redesigned. They made it more elegant, clear and readable. They improved user manuals for the mikroProg™ itself, mikroICD™ and mikroProg Suite™ for PIC® software.

New mikroProg Suite™ for PIC® software v2.20 is officially released. It contains new mikroProg™ firmware upgrade v01.11.11.01 which brings us support for new enhanced family for PIC24® and dsPIC33® devices as well as approximately 4x increase in speed of programming PIC32® microcontrollers. You can get more information about the upgrade in the newly uploaded Firmware Upgrade Guide PDF document.

mikroProg for PIC has been redesigned – [Link]

Timer from 1 to 999s with PIC16F84A

tehnikservice.net writes:

This is a good looking and practical device that can be useful in many areas where countdown timer is needed. This project is based on the PIC16F84A microcontroller. The time range can be adjusted between 1 and 999 seconds.   This project  has 3 buttons and one of them is named Set Button. In order to regulate the seconds up or down  on the display you should press the Set button while pressing the button on the  left or the right  hand side. The author of this project is @Pedja089. More photos on Facebook Fan Page.

Timer from 1 to 999s with PIC16F84A – [Link]

Automating ATmega chips programming

www.ikalogic.com writes:

As you may already know, we have been producing SCANALOGIC-2 Logic analyzer in big quantities for the latest 15 months. This have been our first major product, and over the time we have learned how to (or built ways to) automate most productions steps. Programming the atmega chips (which controls the SCANALOGIC-2)  can take a lot of time. Specially if you have to do it 500 times. Of course, one solution is to buy pre-programmed chips, but this is not always financially interesting.

So to cope with this situation, I developed a small VB.Net program that will automate the programming steps, that is:

  • Erasing the device
  • Programming the fuse bits
  • Burning the HEX file into the device’s flash
  • Building an EEPROM file with a specific serial number for each device
  • Burning the EEPROM file into the device’s eeprom
  • Programming the lock bits and verifying that both the Flash & the EEPROM are securely locked.

Automating ATmega chips programming – [Link]

CREE LED on Star PCB

CREE LED on Star PCB

A CREE MCE4-LED mounted on a STAR PCB. Available in cold white, warm white and RGBW versions, can be powered by a constant current of up to 700 mA –  430 lm

CREE LED WITH MATCHING LENS

A CREE XP-G LED mounted on a STAR PCB. Available in three shades of white and powered by a constant current up to 1050 mA. Matching lenses of 7°, 15.5° or 25° beam angle are available as accessories.

Testing active analog temperature sensors with a multimeter

embedded-lab.com writes:

There are quite a variety of active analog temperature sensor ICs that provide an output voltage proportional to the temperature. They usually don’t require any external calibration and signal conditioning, and as such their output can be directly fed to the input of an ADC for digital processing. A few examples of such sensors are LM34, LM35, TMP35/36/37, and MCP9701. If you are having any trouble using any of these sensors in your project, here is a quick way to test if your sensor is working or not.

Testing active analog temperature sensors with a multimeter – [Link]

AmazonSupply.com: The Hardware Store for Researchers and Developers

SmallParts.com is now AmazonSupply.com – The Hardware Store for Researchers and Developers – [via]

AmazonSupply.com is a new website dedicated to offering a broad selection of parts and supplies to business, industrial, scientific, and commercial customers at competitive prices. AmazonSupply offers more than 500,000 items from leading brands including Mitutoyo, Georgia-Pacific, Brady Corporation, Sandvik, Genie, and Parker.

AmazonSupply.com: The Hardware Store for Researchers and Developers – [Link]

Cosmic Ray Neutron Monitor

Cosmic Ray Neutron Monitor @ Hardware Hacking – [via]

Using a neutron detector to measure cosmic rays may sound odd, but this has been a common way to measure the level of cosmic ray levels since 1948. This is because if the primary cosmic ray that starts a cascade has an energy over 500 MeV, some of its secondary by-products are neutrons that will reach ground where they can be detected.  These systems are commonly called a Neutron Monitor

Cosmic Ray Neutron Monitor – [Link]