Automatic Light Switching System with Dimmer

Manual switching of outdoor lights in houses or roadways can be sometimes really inconvenient especially when we are far away or still at work. Sometimes this becomes an opportunity for thieves to infiltrate houses or a possibility of accident in roadways if night comes and our outdoor lights are still OFF. That is why the goal of this circuit is to automatically switch ON outdoor lights when it senses that it is getting dark and switch OFF lights when it’s daytime.

This type of light switching system is what we can usually see installed in streetlights or houses that are implementing automatic switching of outdoor lights. The system is not just limited to switching ON/OFF lights, it can also adjust the brightness of the lights so that it can just supply the right amount of luminance on the area required. This system is composed of a photocell, a receptacle, a ballast (with dimming control), and a lamp powered by the 220VAC mains. The photocell measures the light intensity level in an area and sends this data in a form of voltages (ranging from 0-10VDC) for the dimming control of the ballast. Based on the level of light intensity sensed by the photocell, the ballast will adjust the brightness of the lamp.

The whole system is supported by the TE Connectivity dimming receptacle 2213362-1. The photocell and ballast are connected through this receptacle. This dimming receptacle supports ANSI standard dimmable photocells with 5 positions (3 power contacts and 2 dimming signal contacts). Its power contacts can handle voltages up to 480V AC/DC provided that the maximum current passing through it will not exceed 15A. The dimming contacts of this receptacle supports 0-10VDC dimming method with a maximum current of 0.10A

Automatic Light Switching System with Dimmer – [Link]

iHome – Intelligent Thermostat Project

IMG_0070

by jwozniak @ jwdevs.com :

The world of IoT for “Smart Home” is growing very fast. There are various areas of interests from security to automated animal care depicted for instance on this page.

I’ve tried to look at the things from the practical point of view. What would be interesting enough to be build as a project and at the same time have a real, quantitive value? It happens that I was always interested in limiting the energy consumption at home. One evening when talking to my wife and trying to get her opinion on my adventures into electronics she said that it would be great to have a heating already on before she gets home (and a cosy, warm place ready exactly when she enters). I guess she said it as a kind of a joke. To her surprise I got attracted by the idea. Hey, why not? With the current state of technology it is actually feasible. Maybe a bit challenging at first sight but still. So this is how it has started. Let’s build a intelligent thermostat that would be off when we are not at home and turning on when we come back! Great! Let’s see, maybe it will even improve the energy consumption…

iHome – Intelligent Thermostat Project – [Link]

Capacitance Meter

FIO94ASIDH7U229.MEDIUM

by ThomasVDD @ instructables.com:

Capacitors are vital components in electronics, but sometimes they are broken, or the value printed on the cap has become unreadable. Because my multi-meter does not have a capacitance measurement, I decided to make one!

The principle of measuring capacitance is quite simple. The voltage of a capacitor charging through a resistor increases with time T. The time it takes to reach a certain voltage, is related to the values of the resistor and capacitor. In this project, we’ll use a 555 timer circuit as a monostable multivibrator. If that sounds like some dark magic to you, don’t worry, it’s quite straightforward. I’ll refer to the the Wikipedia page for the details, as we’ll focus on the things we really need: the schematic and formula. The time in which the capacitor C charges through the resistor R is given by: T = ln(3) x R x C = 1.1 RC. If we know the value of the resistor and the time, we can calculate the capacitance: C = T / 1.1R.

Capacitance Meter – [Link]

How to Control Your ESP8266 From Anywhere in the World

ESP8266

by Rui Santos @ randomnerdtutorials.com:

The most common questions I get about the ESP8266 WiFi Modules are: “Is it possible to control my ESP8266 from anywhere in the world?” and “How can I control my ESP8266 from anywhere?”.

I’m happy to announce today that I have a solution for that problem.

With the new version of Home Automation Server you can add an ESP8266 to your dashboard and control your ESP8266 GPIOs from anywhere in less than 5 minutes!

How to Control Your ESP8266 From Anywhere in the World – [Link]

Get a constant +5V output by switching between a +5V input and a single-cell LI+ rechargeable cell

an_maxim_an5818

App note from Maxim Integrated on providing smooth power from two sources. Link here (PDF)

Design provides a simple method for maintaining an uninterrupted +5V even while switching between the external +5V supply and a rechargeable single-cell Li+ battery.

Get a constant +5V output by switching between a +5V input and a single-cell LI+ rechargeable cell – [Link]

Posting a Tweet with the ESP8266

ESP8266

by Rui Santos @ randomnerdtutorials.com:

In this project you’re going to post a Tweet with an ESP8266. The goal of this project is to show the endless possibilities that this $4 WiFi module offers when integrates with a free platform that I’m about to show you.

In order to accomplish this task you have to sign up for one free service called IFTTT which stands for “If This Then That”.

Posting a Tweet with the ESP8266 – [Link]

4 x 4 mm GPS module for wearables, portables, in distribution

150818edne-nano-spider

by Graham Prophet @ edn-europe.com:

Distributor Acal BFi has the Nano Spider from OriginGPS; the miniature module makes it possible for manufacturers to bring accurate GPS to tiny devices.

Claimed as the world’s smallest GPS module, Nano Spider is a fully integrated, sensitive GPS receiver module. Measuring 4.1 x 4.1 x 2.1 mm and with low power consumption, it is suitable for smart watches, wearable devices, trackers, and digital cameras. A double-sided circuit design reduces footprint size and makes the Nano Spider 47% smaller than previous solutions.

4 x 4 mm GPS module for wearables, portables, in distribution – [Link]

Energy-harvesting power management ICs for wireless sensor nodes

150821edne-cypress-energy-harvesting-pmic-solar-cell-wsn-1-

by Graham Prophet @ edn-europe.com:

Cypress Semiconductor has introduced what it believes to be the lowest-available-power PMICs that enable an integrated module size of 1 cm² for solar-powered wireless sensor node (WSN) designs.

Intended to manage solar-powered wireless sensors for Internet of Things (IoT) applications, these parts are said to be the lowest-power, single-chip Energy Harvesting PMICs, and can be used with solar cells as small as 1 cm². Cypress offers a complete, battery-free energy harvesting solution that pairs the S6AE101A PMIC, the first device in the new family, with the EZ-BLE PRoC module for Bluetooth Low Energy connectivity, along with supporting software, in a $49 kit.

Energy-harvesting power management ICs for wireless sensor nodes – [Link]

DHT22 Humidity datalogger

lucky-resistor-13

by luckyresistor.me:

There is a large cellar where I could store unused items and documents, but the catch is the humidity there. It is a root cellar near a small brook and the humidity varies between 75% up to 90%.

Archived material should never be exposed to humidity greater than 65%, therefore I have to isolate all documents in boxes from the air of the cellar. But are this boxes safe? Do they keep the humidity away from the documents – even for years?

To have a look into the box environment, I need a data logger. It would be simple to buy one, but much more fun to build one. So a new project is born: I call it the “Data Logger” project.

DHT22 Humidity datalogger  – [Link]

How to control LM2596 buck-converter with microcontroller

by hugatry @ hackvlog.com:

Every now and then someone asks on different forums if there is an way to control cheap LM2596 modules with an Arduino or another microcontroller. I decided to demonstrate one solution that might be basic electronics for some, but still many don’t know about.

Those buck converters will change the output voltage to make the feedback pin, connected to the output via a voltage divider, become 1.25V or so. If feedback is higher, output gets lower and vice versa. If one changes the ratio of resistors in voltage divider, output voltage will change. This is usually done by turning a trimmer resistor with a screwdriver. That is good enough for many applications where voltage will be set only once, but sometimes there is a need to adjust the output voltage more frequently.

How to control LM2596 buck-converter with microcontroller – [Link]