Adding Sensors to Monitor Hive Health


by Nathan Seidle @

The Digital Beehive uses Wi-Fi to broadcast a beehive’s weight, humidity, temperature, and battery voltage every minute to SparkFun’s data channel service called Phant. The raw data can be seen here but you can view some prettier graphs of the data here on (sign-in required).

Adding Sensors to Monitor Hive Health – [Link]

Not a battery, not a cap: Murata’s small energy [storage] device


by Graham Prophet @

To meet what the company sees as a gap in the available range of energy storage solutions, Murata has developed the UMAC, a small, high-capacity cylinder-type energy device for use in wearable and wireless sensor applications. Although lithium-ion based, Murata differentiates it from a battery.

The UMAC is a miniature device with a high energy storage capacity, low internal resistance, fast charging and discharging and the ability to withstand load fluctuations. It may be used as a secondary battery in the same way as a capacitor. The UMAC achieves better charge/discharge characteristics and has an extended cycle life superior to conventional batteries. Suited for use as a power supply for wearable devices or sensor nodes for wireless sensor networks, the UMAC maintains flat voltage characteristics while accommodating a wide range of load characteristics.

Not a battery, not a cap: Murata’s small energy [storage] device – [Link]

Logic PCB Business Card


Floyd-Jones designed his own business card using logic circuitry. He writes:

The card implements a digital finite-state machine which displays the next character of my last name on a 7-segment display each time the button is pressed. Luckily all 11 characters in my name can be reasonably shown, essentially spelling out FLoyd-JonES. I simulated the design in Altera’s Quartus II FPGA software before constructing it in Eagle.

Logic PCB Business Card – [Link]

Arduino WiFi Shield 101 is on sale


by Zoe Romano @

We are excited to announce that Arduino Wifi Shield 101 developed with Atmel is now available for purchase on the Arduino Store US (49.90$).

Arduino WiFi Shield 101 is a powerful IoT shield with crypto-authentication that connects your Arduino or Genuino board to the internet wirelessly. Connecting it to a WiFi network is simple, no further configuration in addition to the SSID and the password are required. The WiFI library allows you to write sketches which connect to the internet using the shield.

Arduino WiFi Shield 101 is on sale – [Link]

JIGMOD Electronic Circuit Building System


Succeed with your Innovations by building reliable, high quality electronic circuits. by JIGMOD:

Most electronic components aren’t compatible with breadboards. JIGMOD bridges the gap between those components and your breadboard.
Don’t work hard – work smart! Avoid wasted time spent debugging and troubleshooting.
Be amongst the first to use this revolutionary development platform.
Develop circuits with high quality, reliable results every time
Satisfy your curiosity easily
Succeed in your innovations
Maximize your ability to test and demonstrate your circuits

JIGMOD Electronic Circuit Building System – [Link]

Humidity sensor using 8051



This project is about a simple humidity sensor based on 8051 microcontroller. Humidity sensor is also called hygrometer. This circuit can sense relative humidity (RH) from 20% to 95% at an accuracy of 5%. The humidity information is displayed on a 16×2 LCD display. A relay is also provided which is set to be active when the humidity crosses a certain trip point. The circuit is mains operated and it is very easy to install. DHT11 is the humidity sensor used here. The details and working of the DHT11 humidity sensor is given below.

Humidity sensor using 8051 – [Link]

3D Print the Ultimate Helping Hands for a PCB Workstation


by Giuseppe Finizia @

I am the Senior Analyst of the Electronic Forensics Unit of the Carabinieri (Italian Military Police) and I deal with technical investigations on seized electronic devices. I spend most of my day in a well-equipped electronic laboratory, but I was lacking a tool for performing technical assessments on printed circuit boards (PCBs). I needed a way to secure small boards on my workbench and place multiple probes across the board for acquiring data from a circuit memory, analyzing an I2C or SPI communication bus using a logic state analyzer, and much more.

3D Print the Ultimate Helping Hands for a PCB Workstation – [Link]


Multifunction biosensor/vital signs monitor for wearables, from ams


by Graham Prophet @

Sensor and mixed-signal IC specialist ams (Graz, Austria) has applied optical detection techniques to produce a sensor capable of accurate heart rate measurement; the company says its device is the first “total solution for 24/7 heart rate measurement for wearables”.

AS7000 is the first in what is to be a family of health/fitness solutions from ams, for wearable devices. The AS7000 solution incorporates a highly integrated optical sensor module accompanied by software to provide the highest accuracy optical heart rate measurements (HRM) and heart rate variation (HRV) readings, backed by opto-mechanical design-in support. The 24/7 reference is to indicate that ams intends the device for products that are worn continuously, rather than (for example) only during periods of exercise.

Multifunction biosensor/vital signs monitor for wearables, from ams – [Link]

DIY Motorized Combo Lock Cracking Device

Combo Breaker is a motorized, battery powered, 3D printed, Arduino-based combination lock cracking device. It is portable, open source, 3D models provided, and exploits a new technique I’ve discovered for cracking combination locks in 8 attempts or less, but in an even more exciting, automated fashion.

DIY Motorized Combo Lock Cracking Device – [Link]

Solar Cells Made Obsolete – 3D rectennas aim at 40-to-90% efficiency


R. Colin Johnson @

PORTLAND, Ore.–Now before you get all excited by the headline, which is not click-bait according to the researchers, a new kind of nanoscale rectenna (half antenna and half rectifier) can convert solar and infrared into electricity, plus be tuned to nearly any other frequency as a detector. The invention was made at Georgia Tech (Atlanta) and peer-reviewed in today’s issue of Nature Nanotechnology.

Right now efficiency is only one percent, but in the paper (DOI: 10.1038/nnano.2015.220) professor Baratunde Cola and colleagues at the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech, Atlanta) convincingly argue that they can achieve 40 percent broad spectrum efficiency (double that of silicon and more even than multi-junction gallium arsenide) at a one-tenth of the cost of conventional solar cells (and with an upper limit of 90 percent efficiency for single wavelength conversion).

Solar Cells Made Obsolete – 3D rectennas aim at 40-to-90% efficiency – [Link]