110 GHz spectrum analyzer fits in your pocket

The MS2760A is the latest release in the Ultra-portable family of USB driven instruments – it can perform spectrum measurements from 9kHz to 110GHz in the industries smallest and lightest form factor. by Clemens Valens @ elektormagazine.com:

There was a time, and not so long ago, that spectrum analyzers were large and heavy instruments that had to be wheeled around on a trolley or mounted in a van for field operations. And their upper frequency stopped at say 10 GHz for the really expensive ones. Oh, how things have changed! Today it is possible to carry a spectrum analyzer in your pocket, or stick it on a drone and fly it around. What’s more, it measures frequencies up to 110 GHz.

110 GHz spectrum analyzer fits in your pocket – [Link]

The First and Only Long-Term Stable Metal-Oxide Gas Sensor

At this year’s Sensor+Test 2017 in Nuremberg (May 30 – June 1), Sensirion AG, the expert in environmental and flow sensor solutions, introduces the SGP – the first and only long-term stable metal-oxide gas sensor.

The SGP gas sensor is based on Sensirion’s multi-pixel platform, which integrates four gas sensing elements into a very small 2.45 x 2.45 x 0.9 mm3 DFN package featuring a fully calibrated air quality output signal. The unprecedented combination of long-term stability and multi-pixel technology opens up new possibilities for environmental monitoring in smart home, appliances and Internet of Things applications. Thanks to its unique performance, the SGP allows for the first time the integration of metal-oxide gas sensors into mobile devices.

The First and Only Long-Term Stable Metal-Oxide Gas Sensor – [Link]

thepilocator.com – check the availability of Raspberry Pi

ThePiLocator is a website aims to help you check the availability of pi zero and pi zero w on various online stores.

thepilocator.com – check the availability of Raspberry Pi – [Link]

LT8315 – 560VIN Micropower No-Opto Isolated Flyback Converter

The LT8315 is a high voltage monolithic flyback regulator that simplifies the design of an isolated DC/DC converter. By sampling the reflected isolated output voltage across the third winding on the power transformer, the part requires no opto-isolator or LT1431 for regulation. The LT8315 operates over an 18V to 560V input voltage range, has a 0.30A/630V integrated power switch and delivers up to 15 watts of output power, ideal for electric vehicles and battery stacks, as well as off line, automotive, industrial and medical applications.

LT8315 – 560VIN Micropower No-Opto Isolated Flyback Converter – [Link]

Educational Biomed Shield for Arduino 101

Orlando Hoilett has built his new biomedical Arduino 101 shield: Biomed Shield, in order to allow students, educators, and hobbyists to learn about bio-medicine by monitoring heart rate, temperature, and other physiological metrics.

To build this shield he used the following components:

  • AD5933
  • MLX90614
  • Microchip Rail-to-Rail Input/Output Dual Op-Amp
  • MAX30101: a specialized integrated circuit that is able to perform reflectance photoplethysmography
  • Photocell
  • Thermistor
  • AD8227

Orlando measured heart beats using transmission photoplethysmography using MAZ30101, where a light shines through an extremity such as a finger and a detector measures the amount of light that passes through. When the heart pumps blood through the body,  a momentary increase in blood volume in the fingers happens. As a result, the amount of light that passes through the finger changes with this changing blood volume and is detected by the photodetector.

Bioimpedance Measurement

Bioimpedance is can be another class of bioelectrical measurements where we measure the impedance of the body instead of measuring the electrical signals produced by the body with the help of AD5934 impedance analyser chip. He is also measuring body temperature with the MLX90614 and measuring the amount of light using  a CdS Photocell.

Orlando built this shield for education purposes not as a medical device, and his work on this shield is still in progress. Follow his project on hackster.io to know more details and updates. You can check source files at Github.

Making the Electronics for CDM324 – 24GHz Doppler Motion Sensor

limpkin @ limpkin.fr tries out the CDM324 / IPM165 Doppler effect sensor and proposes an amplification circuit to get the readings out of the sensor. He writes:

You may recall the article I wrote a couple of years ago about a nearly identical Doppler sensor, the HB100.
While the HB100 is using a 10.525GHz frequency, this new module uses 24.125GHz! This has the main advantage of being compatible with European regulations (ETSI #300 400) and having good penetration in dry materials. Moreover, as the main frequency is higher the patch antennas are smaller, hence the tiny 25x25x6mm module.

Making the Electronics for CDM324 – 24GHz Doppler Motion Sensor – [Link]

Arduino MKRFOX1200

MKRFOX1200 is a powerful board that combines the functionality of the Zero and SigFox connectivity. It is the ideal solution for makers wanting to design IoT projects with minimal previous experience in networking having a low power device.

Arduino MKRFOX1200 has been designed to offer a practical and cost effective solution for makers seeking to add SigFox connectivity to their projects with minimal previous experience in networking.

Arduino MKRFOX1200 – [Link]

10 or 12-bit DAC from the ATtiny85

David Johnson-Davies @ technoblogy.com writes:

This article describes how to get up to two 10 or 12-bit digital-to-analogue outputs from an 8-bit Timer/Counter, such as in the ATtiny85. To test the routine I built a circuit which allows you to vary the brightness of two LEDs with two potentiometers:

10 or 12-bit DAC from the ATtiny85 – [Link]

Arduino analogue thermometer

@ htxt.co.za writes:

With so many projects being made with the Arduino, we’ve seen a fair share of thermometer projects that try to do something different. This version, by educ8s.tv, does so by adopting an older look.

Arduino analogue thermometer – [Link]

NanoPi NEO kit lets you build your own network-attached storage system for about $30

@ liliputing.com writes:

The NanoPi Neo is a tiny computer with a quad-core ARM Cortex-A7 processor, Ethernet and USB ports, and support for a number of accessories.

Measuring just 1.6″ x 1.6″ it’s smaller than most Raspberry Pi computers, and with a starting price of $7 it’s also an awfully affordable computer capable of running Ubuntu Linux.

NanoPi NEO kit lets you build your own network-attached storage system for about $30 – [Link]