MaxProLogic: Ultra Low Cost FPGA Development Board

The MaxProLogic is the perfect FPGA project board for the student and hobbyist.

The MaxProLogic is an FPGA development board that is designed to be user friendly and a great introduction into digital design for anyone. The core of the MaxProLogic is the Altera MAX10 FPGA. This powerful chip has 4,000 Logic Elements and 200Kbits of Memory. The MAX10 is easily scalable from the entry level college student to the most advanced projects like an audio sound meter with FFT. Upon the many great features of the MaxProLogic is the MAX10 chip has a built in Flash for configuration and incorporates 8 channels of Analog to Digital Conversion. These two features alone create a far superior FPGA chip than any competitor on the market. It allows the user to create more diverse projects.

MaxProLogic: Ultra Low Cost FPGA Development Board – [Link]

LoFive – Tiny RISC-V Microcontroller Board

Small breadboard friendly development board using the SiFive FE310 RISC-V Microcontroller.

  • MCU – SiFive Freedom E310 (FE310) 32-bit RV32IMAC processor @ up to 320+ MHz (1.61 DMIPS/MHz)
  • Storage – 128-Mbit SPI flash (ISSI IS25LP128)
  • Expansion – 2x 14-pin headers with JTAG, GPIO, PWM, SPI, UART, 5V, 3.3V and GND
  • Misc – 1x reset button, 16 MHz crystal
  • Power Supply – 5V via pin 1 on header; Operating Voltage: 3.3 V and 1.8 V
  • Dimensions – 38 x 18 mm (estimated)
  • License – CERN Open Hardware Licence v1.2

LoFive – Tiny RISC-V Microcontroller Board – [Link]

Alzheimer’s Wearable Assistant

A smartwatch with fall and location detection, reminders and more, designed to help you or your loved one with Alzheimer’s!

When I saw Infineon’s Sensor Hub Nano, it appeared to be a good candidate in such a project, because of its very small size and BLE capabilities. With the accurate pressure sensing, it could be used to detect if the patient has fallen and also tell where exactly the patient is in the house.

Alzheimer’s Wearable Assistant – [Link]

Nutube – low power vaccum tube

A new vacuum tube which puts vacuum fluorescent display technology to practical use is in distribution from RS Components.

Nutube, similar to a conventional vacuum tube, has an anode grid filament structure, and operates exactly as a triode vacuum tube. Also similar to a vacuum tube, it creates the same characteristic rich overtones. By applying their vacuum fluorescent display technology, Noritake Itron Corp., a Noritake Co. Ltd affiliated company, have devised a structure which achieves substantial power saving, miniaturization, and quality improvements when compared with a conventional vacuum tube.

Nutube – low power vaccum tube – [Link]

RELATED POSTS

Researchers Innovated Highly Effective Silicon Microchannel Thermal coolers For Processors

One of the limiting factors for the computing power of processors is the operating temperature. A research team led by Dr. Wolfram Steller, Dr. Hermann Oppermann, and Dr. Jessika Kleff from the Fraunhofer Institute for Reliability and Microintegration IZM, has developed a new as well as an efficient cooling method by integrating microchannels into the silicon interposer. For the first time, it is possible to cool down high-performance processors from the bottom as well.

The integration of microchannels into the silicon interposer
The integration of microchannels into the silicon interposer boosts cooling and processor performance

When processors get too hot to work properly, they reduce their clock speed and operating voltage. In order to protect the CPU and motherboard from getting fried, the processors either reduce their computing speed or even shut off completely. Until now, cooling elements and fans are used to avoid overheating the heat-sensitive components. The researchers found a way to cool processors from the top as well as from below using a liquid-based cooling system.

The research team reports that the innovation can achieve a significant increase in performance. The scientists have also integrated passive elements for voltage regulators, photonic ICs, and optical waveguides into the interposer. This enables highly effective cooling and therefore higher performance. For this purpose, microchannel structures with tightly sealed vias are installed in the silicon interposer, which is located between the processor and the printed circuit board.

Interposers are responsible for the electrical supply and cooling of the processor. Every 200 micrometers, interposers are equipped with electrical connections to ensure the processor’s power supply and data transmission. In order to be able to absorb heat and channel it away from the processor, the researchers at Fraunhofer IZM created microfluid channels that allow coolant to be circulated through vias.

The main challenge to the researchers was to integrate the small channels into the interposer and seal them very tightly in order to separate them from the electrical paths. The solution they came up with is interesting – the interposer is made of two silicon plates – horizontally extending cooling channels and vertically extending channels. They are combined in a complementary manner.

Dr. Hermann Oppermann, the group leader at Fraunhofer IZM, said,

Up to now, the cooling structures are not very close to the computer core itself, which means the coolers are mostly applied from above. The closer you get to the heat source, the better the temperature can be limited or the output increased. In high-performance computing, in particular, the data rates are continuously increasing. Therefore, it is important to have an effective cooling to ensure a higher clock rate.

ESP32 NTP OLED clock

@ blog.danman.eu build a OLED display NTP clock and document his process on his blog:

As a first project with my new ESP32 module with OLED display I chose to build OLED clock. I thought I’ll just find some existing code, upload it and it’s done. There are a few such projects for ESP8266 in NodeMCU. So I started with NodeMCU upload.

ESP32 NTP OLED clock – [Link]

8 Digit Numerical 7 Segment SPI Display Shield for Arduino UNO

8 Digit serial numerical display shield for Arduino has been designed for various applications like digital clock, stop watch, score display, temperature meter, frequency counter, digital meters etc. The circuit uses popular MAX7219 IC and two common cathode 0.5inch red seven segment displays. The MAX7219 is a compact, serial input/output common-cathode display drivers that interface Arduino UNO to 7-segment numeric LED displays of up to 8 digits. Included on-chip are a BCD code-B decoder, multiplex scan circuitry, segment and digit drivers, and an 8×8 static RAM that stores each digit. Only one external resistor R1 provided to set the segment current for all LEDs. A convenient 3-wire serial interface connects to all Arduino UNO. Individual digits may be addressed and updated without rewriting the entire display. The MAX7219 also allows the user to select code-B decoding or no-decode for each digit. The devices include a 150µA low-power shutdown mode, analog and digital brightness control, a scan-limit register that allows the user to display from 1 to 8 digits, and a test mode that forces all LEDs on. The project works with 5V DC and SPI interface connected to Arduino Digital pins D4, D5 and D6.

8 Digit Numerical 7 Segment SPI Display Shield for Arduino UNO – [Link]

Homemade 6 GHz FMCW radar

Henrik Forstén has a nice build log on his newest version of this homemade 6 GHz FMCW radar:

Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW) radar works by transmitting a chirp which frequency changes linearly with time. This chirp is then radiated with the antenna, reflected from the target and is received by the receiving antenna. On the reception side the received signal that was delayed and undelayed copy of the transmitted chirp are mixed (multiplied) together.

Homemade 6 GHz FMCW radar – [Link]

4chord MIDI Plays All the Hits

4chord MIDI – the USB MIDI keyboard to play every major hit pop song with four little buttons. by Sven Gregori:

4chord MIDI – the USB MIDI keyboard dedicated to play all the four chord songs, from Adele via Green Day and Red Hot Chilli Peppers to U2 and Weezer. Thanks to MIDI, you can be any instrument – and all of them at once. Yay!

4chord MIDI Plays All the Hits – [Link]

1Bitsy ARM Cortex-M4F Dev Board

Open-Source Miniature Breadboard Friendly ARM Cortex-M4F Dev Board with 1MB Flash, 196kB RAM, 168MHz, floating point and more.

1Bitsy is a debuggable open source STM32F415 development board. Designed for beginners as well as advanced users that want more control over their embedded software by exposing the JTAG/SWD debug interface that is compatible with the Black Magic Probe JTAG/SWD debugger with built in GDB server.

1Bitsy ARM Cortex-M4F Dev Board – [Link]