How to use Microchip's TC74 sensor for temperature measurement

The TC74 chip is a serially accessible, digital temperature sensor from Microchip Technology that measures the surrounding temperature through its onboard solid-state sensor and provides it in an 8-bit digital word. This tutorial from Embedded Lab describes in detail about the TC74 sensor and its communication interface through an experiment that uses a PIC microcontroller to read the measured temperature from the sensor.

How to use Microchip’s TC74 sensor for temperature measurement – [Link]

How to use Microchip’s TC74 sensor for temperature measurement

The TC74 chip is a serially accessible, digital temperature sensor from Microchip Technology that measures the surrounding temperature through its onboard solid-state sensor and provides it in an 8-bit digital word. This tutorial from Embedded Lab describes in detail about the TC74 sensor and its communication interface through an experiment that uses a PIC microcontroller to read the measured temperature from the sensor.

How to use Microchip’s TC74 sensor for temperature measurement – [Link]

Flashing LED Circuit

This circuit uses the 555 timer in an Astable operating mode which generates a continuous output via Pin 3 in the form of a square wave. This turns the LED (D1) on and off. The speed at which the LED (D1) is turned on and off is set by the values of R1 and R2.

Flashing LED Circuit – [Link]

BlueZigbee: simple relay application

BlueZigbee takes on and off commands from an Android phone and sets a GPIO pin on a remote circuit with this information, allowing for control of relays or other objects.

This program was written as a demo of how the BlueScripts Android application can be used in a simple embedded system to accomplish something useful without having to write any code for Android.

BlueZigbee:  simple relay application – [Link]

BlueScripts: communication across Bluetooth

BlueScripts is a program for the scripting of Bluetooth ASCII messages to Bluetooth radios via an Android phone and an XML file. It is open source.

BlueScripts allows the user to automate sending messages to Bluetooth radios for embedded system projects without the need to input the messages on a terminal application or write a separate Android program.

BlueScripts: communication across Bluetooth – [Link]

 

Mini IR Theremin

pyroelectro.com writes:

The Theremin first came around in the 1920’s and provided us with a host of spooky, creepy sounds and so naturally being able to make one at home with standard electronics is a must. A standard Theremin uses two antennae for pitch and volume control. For this project, we will ignore controlling the volume and just look at controlling pitch.

IR sensors used to detect the distance between the sensor and an object are a perfect fit for a DIY Theremin because they are low cost and they are reliable enough to get the project working. The idea here is that instead of using antennas, we’ll use infrared proximity and be able to play an instrument, the IR Theremin!

Mini IR Theremin – [Link]

Monnit Releases an Additional Seven New Wireless Sensors

Kaysville, Utah – July 06, 2011 – Monnit Corporation (www.monnit.com) today announced the immediate release of seven new low cost wireless sensors designed for commercial, industrial and consumer applications.  The new sensors complement Monnit’s existing line of low-cost wireless sensors to now total nineteen different types of sensors for broad applications.  The new wireless sensors include the following: 

Also, Monnit has released a much anticipated addition to their gateway product line.

  • MonnitLink Ethernet Gateway allows Monnit WIT Wireless Sensors to communicate with Monnit’s online sensor monitoring and alerting system without the need for a computer.

Monnit Releases an Additional Seven New Wireless Sensors – [Link]

element14 Announces Partnership with RTOS Leader Micrium

element14, the leading online design engineer community, today announced a worldwide distribution agreement with Micrium, a global RTOS leader and a top choice for embedded design engineers. This new agreement is designed to enhance the value proposition of both element14 and its parent company, Premier Farnell, as they continue developing and growing the already extensive supplier group with additional leading technology suppliers to satisfy the evolving requirements of customers worldwide.

This supplier agreement is one of the many enhancements planned for the recently announced element14 knode, the industry’s first tool of its kind designed to help engineers accelerate design and development, and bring products to market faster than ever before. Micrium will extend its product and marketing support to collaborate on new product information through the element14 knode, allowing engineers to easily access Micrium’s increasingly preferred commercial RTOS components to streamline the design process even further.

element14 Announces Partnership with RTOS Leader Micrium – [Link]

PC Fan RPM Bargraph Meter with PIC

pcbheaven.com writes:

I’m really very happy to present this circuit! This is a very special page, and what’s special about it is that this circuit is designed NOT by me, but from a PCB Heaven reader, which happens to be also one of my students in my PIC classes. As a matter of fact, he is my first student… Well, ok, he is my only student :). So, this is the very first circuit page that i host in my site which is designed by a PCB Heaven reader. Special thanks to Panagioti Kalogeri, which you will find him trolling around my site with the id _Pike…

This circuit is the result of an exercise that i asked him to make, in order to practice with the Timer modules of the PIC. The PIC will read the tacho output of a PC fan. The rpm is then translated into a number of LEDs turned-on on the bar-graph. The minimum rpm during which only one LED is turned on is 600 rpm, and the maximum is 1200 – which is also the max speed of the fan. Panagiotis was asked to implement the rpm measurement with the Reverse Frequency Measuring as described here.

PC Fan RPM Bargraph Meter with PIC – [Link]

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New version of 'Elektor Electronic Toolbox' for iPad / iPhone released

The ‘Elektor Electronic Toolbox’ (EET) is an iPhone and iPad app totally geared the needs of electronic engineers. Elektor now offers a new version, which now has 29 individual programs. A new addition is a tool for voltage rms calculation. In addition some bugs were cleared and new components added such as USB 3.0 connectors.

EET’s established features are impressive, too: the databases for the component groups identified as bipolar transistors, FETs, triacs, thyristors, diodes and ICs are very helpful in everyday electronics developing. The left part of the display allows you to select a component from a list, based on the type number. For this, simply scroll down with your finger, which is a smooth process on an iPad. A tap with your fingertip and the pin and important electrical characteristics pop up on the right hand side of the screen – all without an Internet connection present. A total of over 45,000 components are listed in the databases. [via]

New version of ‘Elektor Electronic Toolbox’ for iPad / iPhone released – [Link]