Geiger Counter Kit – Radiation Sensor

Detect particles and/or make a cool random number generator with this handsome Geiger counter kit. This easy-to-make pack of parts turns a simple Geiger-Muller tube (included) into a portable blink, beeping radiation detector. You can also connect an FTDI friend to the header, to get serial output for datalogging on your computer.

Geiger Counter Kit – Radiation Sensor – [Link]

Mitutoyo Digital Calipers

HamRadio2008 writes – [via]

The demonstration is of the Mitutoyo Electronic Caliper measuring SOT-223 component and 1 inch reference. Also a small voltage monitor that I added to a battery I use for microcontroller projects..

Mitutoyo Digital Calipers – [Link]

Freescale introduces intelligent sensor for car battery monitoring

Freescale Semiconductor introduced the MM912J637 intelligent battery sensor (IBS), which accurately measures the voltage, current and temperature of lead-acid batteries and calculates the battery state, all while operating in harsh automotive conditions. The ability to accurately assess these battery parameters is becoming more important with increases in the number of hybrid vehicles on the road and overall electronic content in vehicles, as well as the introduction of start-stop systems. [via]

Freescale introduces intelligent sensor for car battery monitoring – [Link]

Meet Nest, the world's first Learning Thermostat

Nest learns from your temperature adjustments, programs itself to keep you comfortable, and guides you to energy savings. You can control the thermostat from anywhere using a smartphone, tablet or laptop, and Nest never stops learning, even as your life and the seasons change.

Meet Nest, the world’s first Learning Thermostat – [Link]

Meet Nest, the world’s first Learning Thermostat

Nest learns from your temperature adjustments, programs itself to keep you comfortable, and guides you to energy savings. You can control the thermostat from anywhere using a smartphone, tablet or laptop, and Nest never stops learning, even as your life and the seasons change.

Meet Nest, the world’s first Learning Thermostat – [Link]

Stereo Audio Amplifier with a TDA2616

enide.net writes:

I built my first power amplifier when I was still in secondary school. The circuit was made of transistors, didn’t provide much power and had an ugly PCB.

Around the same time I got access to a datasheet of TDA1524, a tone/volume control circuit, and I decided to use it to build a pre-amplifier, to improve the quality of the sound coming out of the amplifer. Both circuits worked well for almost a decade but the old amplifier was never up to my expectations.
In 2006 I decided that it was time to build a real power amplifier, this time based on an integrated circuit to reduce the number of external components and cost.

Stereo Audio Amplifier with a TDA2616 – [Link]

VHF/UHF Basic Frequency Counter

enide.net writes:

A long time ago I built a radio using a Philips UV616/6456 TV tuner that is capable of receiving radio signals over a large range of frequencies. It ranges from 47MHz up to 860Mhz which gives me the possibility of decoding either Over-the-Air or Cable TV signals.

The problem is that the radio doesn’t have a frequency display, so tuning a particular frequency is always a challenge.

This project is about building a frequency counter, using a 2×16 LCD and a small PIC 18F1320 micro-controller.

VHF/UHF Basic Frequency Counter – [Link]

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PIC sound player (PCM to PWM converter)

enide.net writes:

This project makes a PIC microcontroller speak audio PCM sounds using PWM modulation! Pulse-code modulation (PCM) is a digital representation of an analog signal where the magnitude of the signal is sampled regularly at uniform intervals, then quantized to a series of symbols in a digital (usually binary) code [1]. Pulse-width modulation (PWM) of a signal or power source involves the modulation of its duty cycle, to either convey information over a communications channel or control the amount of power sent to a load [2].

PIC sound player (PCM to PWM converter) – [Link]

Candle Simulator

www.enide.net writes:

The aim of this project is to create a credible simulation of the light of a candle. Candle light is usually warm and waves slowly with the random oscillations of the air in the surrounding environment.
Here’s a sample image showing the effect of a candle. The oscillations are somewhat random, depending on the flow of the air surrounding the candle.
It should be possible to simulate the effect of a candle with a small electronic circuit that generates random patterns or numbers.

Candle Simulator – [Link]

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