DTMF Module

C039_1

DTMF Development Board offers a very convenient way to generate DTMF tones and demodulate it.  It uses the famous MT8880/MT8888 DTMF transreceiver IC.

  • Easy 10 pin Box Header connector for interfacing data/control pins
  • Crystal derived frequency source for accurate generation and demodulation of DTMF tones for your project
  • Onboard upto 350 mW audio amplifier block for DTMF tones with Volume Adjust Preset
  • 5V Supply sourced via interfacing Box Header
  • Header  type analog connection
  • Four mounting holes 3.2 mm each
  • PCB dimensions 56 mm x 49 mm

DTMF Module – [Link]

RELATED POSTS

Matchbox car

IMG_20150808_132911-600x450

Shane has been working on making small robots and made a prototype of a matchbox car, a robot car that fits inside a matchbox:

This build consists of a tiny DC motors ripped from a pair of 9g servos, a h-bridge motor controller, an el-cheapo 8 bit pic and a 100mAh 3.7V LiPo battery.

Matchbox car – [Link]

Arduino-based “Analog” slow cooker controller

IMG_0884_SM-600x400

Dan Ternes blogged about his Arduino-based controller for analog slow cookers:

With the AC power control figured out, I considered the User Interface. I opted for something simple. The Adafruit RGB LCD Shield would work well as it had both a display and buttons built in. Sure, I could have beat this project about the head and neck with “IoT”-this and “ESP8266″-that, but I was feeling lazy and just wanted a simple timer control. Of course, there’s nothing that says I won’t add some kind of wireless connectivity, but for now, local control is fine.

Arduino-based “Analog” slow cooker controller – [Link]

Tic-Tac TV Remote Jammer

FC12J9RID1HYBBM.MEDIUM

by DangerousTim @ instructables.com:

That moment you take your eyes off the TV remote for just a second, because of which it falls into the hands of your annoying sibling. Yes, fighting for control over the TV is a daily struggle for many. But the TV Remote Jammer shown in this Instructable, will make everyone else stop dead in their tracks.

This Remote Jammer circuit, in the disguise of an inconspicuous TicTac Box, sends a constant signal to the TV receiver that interferes with the signal from the TV remote. This means that when the Jammer is on, your TV remote CANNOT be used to change channels. It practically blocks all signals from the remote.

Tic-Tac TV Remote Jammer – [Link]

PIC18 Development Board with Ethernet and USB

FMTEZZDID77M637.MEDIUM

by magkopian @ instructables.com:

The development board is based on a PIC18LF4553 microcontroller. The microcontroller features a Full Speed USB 2.0 (12Mbit/s) interface without the need for any external components. Also, it has 32KB of program memory, 2KB of RAM and it supports an external clock up to 48MHz, which is optional because it also has an 8MHz internal clock.

The ENC28J60 Ethernet controller is used to provide Ethernet connectivity to the microcontroller thought the SPI interface. The ENC28J60 has an integrated MAC and a 10Base-T PHY, 8KB of buffer RAM, supports both Full and Half-Duplex modes and it is fully compatible with 10/100/1000Base-T networks.

PIC18 Development Board with Ethernet and USB – [Link]

8T49N004 Programmable Femtoclock® NG with 4-outputs

This design features a fourth generation programmable femtoclock that provides reference frequencies to replace crystals and SAW oscillators in high-performance applications. It is programmable through I2C interface. It has four selectable LVPECL or LVDS via I2C while its FemtoClock NG VCO ranges between 1.9GHz to 2.55GHz. It also meets the standard interface requirements of PCI Express (2.5Gb/s), Gen 2 (5Gb/s), and Gen 3 (8Gb/s) jitter that are low in both clock synthesizers and phase-locked oscillators.

The design is comprised of few components that can be divided into three main areas. First, the I2C interface area that uses optoisolator to ensure the compatibility of the external I2C device to the main clock frequency synthesizer. Second, the main part where the IDT8T49N004I clock generator generates the clock with selectable LVDS or LVPECL outputs. Lastly, the power supply of the device uses a low noise Low DropOut (LDO) regulator that is optimized for fast transient response. It also makes use of reference diodes and capacitor filters that secure the system from possible noise produced from the supply.

The design is applicable to several applications that requires reference clock especially network processors and Application-Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs). It can improve the overall performance of the device since it makes the device more immune to noise and other undesired system behavior.

8T49N004 Programmable Femtoclock® NG with 4-outputs – [Link]

Irrighino – Arduino Yun Watering System

irrighino-schema

Irrighino is a complete watering system, based on Arduino Yun. by lucadentella.it:

The main features are:
a configurable number of solenoid valves
an AJAX web interface
a weekly schedule
manual activation / deactivation

Irrighino – Arduino Yun Watering System – [Link]

Homemade x-ray inspector reveals PCB secrets

capture_021

John McMaster has written an article detailing his homemade x-ray scanner:

In some previous posts I talked about getting an x-ray head working, reverse engineering an x-ray sensor, and working with LinuxCNC. In this post I put them all together so that I can take a bunch of x-ray snapshots across an entire PCB. This allows me to more quickly reverse engineer PCBs.

Homemade x-ray inspector reveals PCB secrets – [Link]

RELATED POSTS

Simple and small temperature fan control

FanControl4-600x462

Xristost published a new project, a simple and small temperature fan control:

I published this schematic long ago in this article: Adjustable power supply and since then I made some improvements in PCB to make the board as small as possible. The idea is to be easy to attach the whole board to the heat sink which we want to monitor. The board is only 27mm x 27m

Simple and small temperature fan control – [Link]

Toshiba launches 256-Gbit 48-layer 3-D NAND flash

Toshiba BiCS

by Susan Nordyk @ edn.com:

Ready for sampling in September, Toshiba’s 48-layer BiCS (Bit Cost Scalable) flash memory stores 256 Gbits using a 3-D vertically stacked cell structure and 3-bit-per-cell triple-level cell technology. By employing this 48-layer vertical stacking process, BiCS flash surpasses the capacity of conventional 2-D NAND flash memory, where cells are arrayed in a planar direction on a silicon plane.

BiCS also enhances write/erase reliability endurance and boosts write speeds. The 256-Gbit (32-Gbyte) device can be used in a myriad of applications, including consumer solid-state drives, smart phones, tablets, memory cards, and enterprise SSDs for data centers.

Toshiba launches 256-Gbit 48-layer 3-D NAND flash – [Link]