Kinetis KEA128 StarterTRAK for CAN Applications

This reference design is a low-cost development kit based on Kinetis EA series MCUs that allows faster prototyping and tool reuse. This evaluation board features either one of the KEA128, KEA64 or KEA8 MCUs, depending on the board version. This particular design uses KEA128. The Kinetis EA series MCUs are a highly scalable portfolio of 32-bits ARM Cortex -M0+ MCUs aimed for general automotive applications. The family is optimized for cost-sensitive applications offering low pin-count option with very low power consumption.

This design utilizes a Kinetis KEA128 MCU, which has an ARM Cortex-M0+ core. Also, it features a CAN module, a UART module with LIN capabilities, a pulse width timer (PWT) and a keyboard interrupt module (KBI). All these peripherals along with standard serial communication protocols such as I2C and SPI offer flexibility for a wide variety of applications. The TRK-KEA board includes an onboard OpenSDA programmer and debugger, LIN physical transceiver, CAN physical transceiver, a light sensor, four LEDs and two pushbuttons for user interface.

With 2.7V-5.5V supply and focus on exceptional electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) and ESD robustness, Kinetis EA series MCUs devices are well suited to a wide range of applications ranging from body applications, powertrain companion chips or generic sensor nodes, park assistance, pump/fan controller, and motorcycle CDI/EFI. In automotive body applications, the Kinetis EA series MCUs are a great option for entry level body controller or gateway module, window/roof/sun-roof controller, immobilizer or seat/mirror controller, ambient lighting, just to mention a few.

Kinetis KEA128 StarterTRAK for CAN Applications – [Link]

ATMEGA328 Component Tester

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baweja_akshay @ instructables.com has build a ATMEGA328 component tester that is able to test Resistors, Capacitors, Inductors, BJT, FET, Thyristors and more.

Coming upon COMPONENT TESTER so it can test almost everything, obviously not the power components because they require more current and power which our AVR Microcontroller couldn’t handle !! Oh yeah, I forgot to tell you guys that we would be using an ATMEGA328 for our build !!

ATMEGA328 Component Tester – [Link]

First look at the WeMos D1 Arduino compatible ESP8266 Wifi Board

In this video educ8s.tv take a look at the WeMos D1: a Wi-Fi enabled Arduino compatible board based on the ESP8266 chip.

First look at the WeMos D1 Arduino compatible ESP8266 Wifi Board – [Link]

Building a low cost wifi camera

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Johan @ johan.kanflo.com build his own Wifi webcam combining an Arducam Mini and a ESP8266 Wifi module. The result is the Esparducam board!

Sometime ago I came across the Arducam Mini which is quite a nice camera module from UCTronics. It is a small PCB with a two megapixel OmniVision OV2640 sensor, an interchangeable lens and an FPGA to do the heavy lifting of image processing and JPEG encoding.

Building a low cost wifi camera – [Link]

Arduino-Powered Laser Engraver

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MichielD99, a 16 year old Belgian teenage maker build this amazing laser engraver using Arduino UNO, two NEMA-17 stepper motors and stepper motor drivers.

This laser engraver uses a 1.8W 445nm laser module, of course, this is nothing compared to the industrial laser cutters who use lasers of (a lot) more than 50W. But this laser will do well for us. It can cut through paper and cardboard and it can engrave all kinds of wood. I haven’t tested other materials yet, but I’m sure it can engrave many other materials. l will let you know! It has a large engraving surface of about 500x380mm.

Arduino-Powered Laser Engraver – [Link]

Simple Arduino SD-Card GPS/NMEA Datalogger

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KF5OBS @ jaunty-electronics.com shows us how to build a minimalistic GPS datalogger. The GPS logger is based on the Arduino platform and stores raw NMEA sentences from pretty much any GPS module to a SD card.

For a project I needed to log GPS information. I had various GPS modules and plenty of Arduinos laying around the lab. At first I intended for the Arduino to capture data from the GPS module, process it and then store it onto a SD card. However, I discarded that idea in favor of more flexibility and now use the arduino merely as pass-thru device for the raw GPS data.

Simple Arduino SD-Card GPS/NMEA Datalogger – [Link]

Hobbyist Electronic Inventory SysTem

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Mike @ jaxcoder.com has published a Beta version of his Electronics Parts Inventory System for Windows OS:

The Windows Hobbyist Electronic Inventory System or WinHesit is an electronics component organizer on steroids that was developed with the electronic hobbyist in mind. Designed to be light weight, responsive and most of all easy to use it also allows a lot of information to be optionally entered for those that need to store more data that is to be associated with the component.

WinHeist can be used right out of the box or customized to work the way you work. A database of common parts is provided to get you started but configuring the application to your specifications is easy and once configured the settings can be saved so that all future DBs can use the same settings.

Hobbyist Electronic Inventory SysTem – [Link]

Home energy monitoring using Nucleo and Raspberry Pi

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TSalwach @ github.com build a 3-phase home power meter system. A STM32F072RB MCU on Nucleo evaluation board make measurements and Raspberry Pi 1 collects data and share via web interface.

I want to have real time power measurement of my home in my smartphone. I’ve got one some long time ago, it was counting time between pulses on energy meter. It was sufficient, but when I upgraded my home to three phase AC I thought it would be nice to have some new gadget, so I’ve built one.

Home energy monitoring using Nucleo and Raspberry Pi – [Link]

 

555 Based DC Motor Speed Controller

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555 DC Motor Speed Controller project will control the speed of a DC motor connected to it. This project is built using the popular 555 timer IC.

Specifications

  • Power supply input 5-12V DC
  • Motor Load Up to 1 to 2Amps
  • Onboard preset to vary Duty Cycle from 10% to 95% @ 120 Hz
  • Ideal for mini drill and robotics application
  • Transistor based output drive with heat-sink
  • Diode protection for motor surge
  • Power-On LED indicator
  • Screw terminal connector for easy power supply input and output-Motor connection
  • Four mounting holes of 3.2 mm each
  • PCB dimensions 47 mm x 56 mm

555 Based DC Motor Speed Controller – [Link]

Sparkfun: First Impressions of the ESP32

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Jimb0 @ sparkfun.com takes a first look on the new ESP32 WiFi board by Espressif that’s an improvement of the ESP8266 board.

The ESP32 doesn’t replace the ESP8266, but it does improve on it in every aspect. Not only does it have WiFi support, but it also features a Bluetooth 4.2 radio, making it even more versatile. The CPU is similar to the ESP8266 – it’s a 32-bit Xtensa® LX6, but the ESP32 has two cores! There’s also 128KB of ROM and 416KB SRAM, but Flash memory (for program and data storage) is still left up to an external chip (up to 64MB).

Sparkfun: First Impressions of the ESP32 – [Link]