Environmental Alert System

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by Aleator777:

What’s that smell? It’s noxious gas of course! If you’re in an environment where there’s a possibility of gaseous release of which you’d rather not breathe, why not build an automatic system for sensing and alerting you? The design for the Environmental Alert System is driven by my motivation to understand the concentrations of different chemicals in the air. The unit consists of an array of four gas sensors (one each for methane, propane, carbon monoxide, and smoke) connected to an Intel Edison for wireless detection and alerting. While no substitute for a proper commercial chemical detection system, the EAS makes for a great weekend project!

Environmental Alert System – [Link]

Make an Apple Watch Door Unlocker

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Here’s how to automagically open doors at home or at work with a tap on your wrist. By Marc Jensen, James Squires and Shawn Roske:

What’s an Apple Watch good for? How about unlocking doors with just a tap on an app? We figured out how do something no one else has done for under 150 bucks, using standard door-strike hardware, our custom app, and a tiny RFduino microcontroller. In this Weekend Project we’ll show you exactly how to do it.

Make an Apple Watch Door Unlocker – [Link]

RELATED POSTS

Nixie Tube Clock

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by Pete Mills :

If you’ve poked around the internets where electronics hobbyists collect, it is likely that you are acutely aware of our incontrovertible affinity for building timekeeping clocks. It is similarly unlikely that you have been able to evade the plenitude of nixie tube based projects. There is a reason for this.

Nixie tubes are cool. They have great aesthetic appeal with their difficult-to-photograph, warm orange glow, and dem curvy numerals. They add an organic je ne sais quoi to a hobby with ostensibly digital design cues. Further, they pose technical challenges in the way of producing and switching the ~175 V DC needed to light each tube element. And as far as I am aware, there are no new nixie tubes being produced; as such, procurement can be a challenge unto itself. My N.O.S. nixies came from Russia thru Ebay, and only 3 were duds. Incidentally the seller replaced those 3, FOC.

Nixie Tube Clock – [Link]

DE1-SoC Development Board from Terasic

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by Joel Bodenmann:

The DE1-SoC board is populated with a six digit 7-segment display. All digits are connected to the FPGA. Therefore, in order to control the 7-segment display out of the Linux userspace code, one has to create a new component in QSys that is connected to the AMBA-AXI bus.
But first of all, please note that this is a blog post, not a comprehensive tutorial. The text below does not replace the official Altera documentation. Furthermore, the post does just show some code snippets. However, the fully working project can be found as a download at the very bottom.

DE1-SoC Development Board from Terasic – [Link]

Homemade breadboard

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by robertgawron.blogspot.com:

A breadboard can be also made at home, from one side, it will be more expensive than those on the markets, but for another side, it’s possible to add commonly used elements, like LEDs, switches, or other things, for example I added a precision IC socket that makes putting in and out of ICs much easier. Choosing what to put there is a bit like a making homemade pizza, one can put anything he likes (and what he has currently in the fridge).

Homemade breadboard – [Link]

 

Electronics-Lab.com New Design is Launched

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We are happy to deploy our new design here on Electronics-Lab.com. We hope you like it and feel free to leave your feedback.

Forum conversion is also done from SMF to IPBoard, but some posts, members and attachments where not able to be converted. If you are unable to login with your old details please register again on the new community.

If you are looking for something and you can’t find it be sure to use Google search from or search using the blog’s search form.

BBC Micro Bit computer’s final design revealed

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by Leo Kelion @ bbc.com:

The BBC has revealed the final design of the Micro Bit, a pocket-sized computer set to be given to about one million UK-based children in October.

The device – which features a programmable array of red LED lights – includes two buttons and a built-in motion sensor that were not included in a prototype shown off in March.

But another change means the product no longer has a slot for a thin battery.

That may compromise its appeal as a wearable device.

An add-on power pack, fitted with AA batteries, will be needed to use it as a standalone product.

The BBC’s director general Tony Hall said the device should help tackle the fact children were leaving school knowing how to use computers but not how to program them.

BBC Micro Bit computer’s final design revealed – [Link]

RELATED POSTS

Microchip Touch and Gesture Solutions

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by Martin Cooke @ elektormagazine.com:

Microchip has announced a new addition to its portfolio of human interface solutions. The MTCH6303 supports touch panel sensors with up to 1000 nodes and 10 inch diagonals. The device uses signal processing to filter noise and provide predictive tracking of up to 10 fingers, at scan rates of up to 250Hz with a minimum of 100Hz each for five touches. The projected-capacitive touch controller provides multi-touch coordinates as well as a ready-made multi-finger surface gesture suite that can bring modern user interface elements such as pinch and zoom, multifinger scrolling and swipes to any embedded design with minimal loading on the host processor. It can also be used with Microchip’s MTCH652 high-voltage line driver to achieve better SNR in noisy environments.

When combined with the MGC3130, the MTCH6303 solution is also capable of supporting 3D air gestures up to 20cm distance from the touch panel. Microchip’s MGC3130 E-field-based 3D tracking and gesture controller includes Microchip’s patented GestIC technology, allowing user input via natural hand and finger movements in free space.

Microchip Touch and Gesture Solutions – [Link]

35VIN & VOUT battery charge controller delivers up to 20A

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LTC4015 is a highly integrated, high voltage multichemistry synchronous step-down battery charger controller with onboard telemetry functions. The device efficiently transfers power from a variety of input sources, such as wall adapters and solar panels, to a Li-Ion/Polymer, LiFePO4 or lead-acid battery stack and system load up to 35V.

It provides advanced system monitoring and management functionality, including battery Coulomb counting and health monitoring. While a host microcontroller is required to access the most advanced features of the LTC4015, the use of an I²C port is optional. The main charging features of the product can be adjusted using pin-strap configurations and programming resistors.

35VIN & VOUT battery charge controller delivers up to 20A – [Link]

An Android Reflow controller that anyone can build

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Andy build an android reflow controller based on ATMega8L . He writes:

Welcome to the never ending saga of Andy and his reflow controllers. About a year ago I published a project writeup showing how I built a PID-based reflow controller. It featured a 640×360 graphical LCD from the Sony U5 Vivaz mobile phone and was all-surface mount. It worked well and continues to serve me well to this day but I always thought that there were improvements that I could make in several areas.

Firstly, there’s no reason why it should have been all surface-mount. The LCD in particular has a 0.4mm connector that many people will find very hard to solder by hand. After all, presumably you’re building a reflow controller to help solve that very problem. Chicken and egg.

An Android Reflow controller that anyone can build – [Link]