Intel Edison Oscilloscope

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by tnkrmnz @ instructables.com:

Edison-Scope, is an Intel Edison controlled 200 Msa/S mixed signal oscilloscope. It provides an Operating System agnostic method to control the MSO-28 oscilloscope. By leveraging the web browser on the modern smart devices, one can control USB based hardware traditionally requires a desktop OS. Conceptually this project is very similar to the PiMSO project, but the similarity exist only on the client side. The server side was rewritten using Node.js. Node.js provided a more device independent solution to the server side of the WebMSO project.

Intel Edison Oscilloscope – [Link]

Large area industrial crystalline silicon n-PERT solar cell with 22 percent efficiency

largeareaind

by Hanne Degans @ phys.org:

Nano-electronics research center imec announced today that it has improved its large area n-type PERT (passivated emitter, rear totally diffused) crystalline silicon (Si) solar cell on 6″ commercially available n-type Cz-Si wafers, now reaching a top conversion efficiency of 22.02 percent (calibrated at ISE CalLab). This is the highest efficiency achieved for this type of 2-side-contacted solar cell on an industrial large area wafer size.

Compared to p-type silicon solar cells, n-type cells do not suffer from light induced degradation and feature a higher tolerance to common metal impurities. As a result, n-type silicon solar cells are considered as promising alternatives to p-type solar cells for next generation highly efficient solar cells.

Large area industrial crystalline silicon n-PERT solar cell with 22 percent efficiency – [Link]

miniSpartan6+ Video In Video Out Demo

miniSpartan6+ Video In Video Out Demo from Scarab Hardware on Vimeo.

In this video we show miniSpartan6+ working as video receiver and transmitter. miniSpartan6+ is available now on scarabhardware.com/shop/

miniSpartan6+ Video In Video Out Demo – [Link]

Electricity usage monitor

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by Nurgak @ github.com:

To measure my electricity usage I decided to build a small system that would count LED blinks on my power meter which indicate the used Wh. It was pretty straight forward system requiring an Internet connected microcontroller to log the data and some sort of sensor that would detect LED blinks on the power meter which is not my property and thus not accessible or modifiable.

The main reason to do this project is to get a better overview of the electricity usage as the house is heated by a heat pump so basically everything works on electricity or other free (thermal solar collector) and renewable sources (stove).

I had a CC3200 development kit laying around, it’s featuring a chip with Wi-Fi and an ARM Cortex-M4 processor running at 80MHz, it was more than enough to fill all the needs of this project.

Electricity usage monitor – [Link]

Blueprintf – a bluetooth serial monitor

Bob Alexander of Galactic Studios made this bluetooth serial monitor for embedded microcontroller projects, the Blueprintf:

One way of debugging microcontroller-based projects is to send messages out the UART serial port. Then, a UART-to-USB interface can feed the messages into your PC for display. But I wanted a small, portable device for viewing serial data without a PC, and I wanted it to use my cell phone or tablet for its display.
There are a few advantages to this. First, I don’t always have my PC nearby; maybe the project worked fine on my workbench, but doesn’t work “in the field

IV9 & IV16 tube numitron clock

numitron-board-explained

by Alan @ kalshagar.wikispaces.com:

I found those beautiful vintage IV9 & IV16 tubes and I had to use them, clock being the perfect candidate. I made already mutliple others based on what was supposed to be a WordClock (hence the project name) only, but became more diversified. I did also a first test with a chainable 5cm x 5cm tube board, this is a 5cm x 10cm dual board improved version.

When I made this project and designed it the idea I had was of course the design (very important) but also reusability and pragmaticallity regarding the components used. What I mean by the latest is that you never really know what component you’ll have at hand, depends on your provider, the component availability, it’s price, or even the package DIP or SMD. Hence the board can work with 3 different type of RTC clocks: just use your favorite or the one in your shelf stock. Personally I love the Maxims DS3231 and DS3234 which are temperature compensated (to a fantastic extend for the DS3234), and both are accessed through different protocols: SPI for the DS3234 and TWI for DS3231. There’s also the EPSON RTC4543 for those living in Japan like me. So again depending of what else you need to wire, choose your poison: all the pins of the MCU are accessible and there’s even a small zone for some DIP components.
The top board uses 74HC595 for maintaining the displayed digits: they come very cheap but I didn’t want to be stuck to the DIP or SMD model (having both in stock), so the board can use any of the two. Same goes with the current limiter resistors: SMD, through hole or even resistor array, your pick. And of course there’s a SMD or DIP led footprint under each tube for the blingbling! (single color, not RGB led)

IV9 & IV16 tube numitron clock – [Link]

Internet Controlled Mains Switcher

 

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by alistair_uk @ instructables.com:

This is a very low cost and basic from of home automation allowing you to turn on and off lights and other devices using your computer or mobile phone.

It has been built and tested use using UK power plugs, but the same protocol is used on many budget remote power switchers from around the world.

Internet Controlled Mains Switcher – [Link]

Automotive Active Antenna Supply Solution

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Infineon’s TLF4277-2 is the ideal companion IC to supply active antennas for car infotainment applications. An adjustable output voltage means the TLF4277-2 can supply the majority of standard active antennas such as FM/AM, DAB, XM and SIRIUS.

The TLF4277-2 is a monolithic integrated low dropout voltage regulator capable of supplying loads up to 300 mA. For an input voltage up to 40 V, the TLF4277-2 provides an adjustable output voltage in a range from 5 V up to 12 V.

Automotive Active Antenna Supply Solution – [Link]

Configurable Buck DC/DCs Deliver a Total of 8A from 2 to 4 Independent Outputs for Power System Flexibility

3371

Linear Technology Corporation announces the LTC3371, a highly integrated general-purpose power management solution for systems requiring multiple low voltage power supplies. The device features four synchronous buck converters, each powered from independent 2.25 V to 5.5 V inputs, and each configurable to share up to four of eight available 1 A power stages. With eight unique output current configurations, the LTC3371 provides substantial flexibility and ease of reuse across many different applications. The device is ideal for a wide variety of multichannel industrial, automotive, communications and distributed power systems.

Configurable Buck DC/DCs Deliver a Total of 8A from 2 to 4 Independent Outputs for Power System Flexibility – [Link]

Custom DIY Intel Edison Breakout Board

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by Stephen Edward:

A Simple Breakout board for the edison. Does nothing special except breaks out the 70pin connector to 2.54mm Pins so you can start experimenting with the Edison.

Has an experimenters area so you can solder on things like a regulator or Level shifter.

It also has the bottom side through connectors so that you can daisy change multiple boards or other Edison shields

Custom DIY Intel Edison Breakout Board – [Link]