Hardware category

Dintervalometer, A Custom Made Intervalometer For DSLR Cameras

If you want to take a timelapse with your camera, it may be helpful to use an intervalometer. It is an attachment or facility on a camera that operates the shutter regularly at set intervals over a period, in order to take timelapse series or take pictures after a set delay.

Daniel Knezevic had developed a custom made intervalometer for DSLR cameras. Dintervalometer (Deni’s intervalometer) enables cameras to shoot time lapses and allows shutter speeds longer than the 30s.

The Dintervalometer is built with an Atmega328P clocked at 10MHz, a PCD8544 84×48 pixel monochrome LCD display with a backlight, a 3.5mm male jack connector, and two tactile push buttons all combined together on a small PCB.

Dintervalometer Features

  • Intervalometer: It is used for time-lapse photography. It controls how often, how long and how many shots are taken.
  • Bulb mode: It allows to take time exposures longer than 30s.
  • Backlight
  • Charging via USB

The Display & Backlight

The PCD8544 LCD display can be powered using 3V3 and it draws very small amounts of power (around 200uA) making it extremely good for use in battery powered devices. It is typically used in Nokia 5110/3310 phones, and it interfaces to microcontrollers through a serial bus interface (SPI).

A custom made backlight were designed to allow using the Dintervalometer in the dark without an additional lamp. It operates like a backlight of a cell phone: it is active for 10 seconds when the user presses a button or the Dintervalometer finishes some job.

The backlight consists of these materials:

  • A sheet of white paper
  • A piece of transparent plastic
  • A double-sided tape

The first layer of the backlight is a sheet of white paper. Its main function is to reflect the light of the LEDs. Then it comes the piece of transparent plastic. The top of the plastic is sanded with a fine sandpaper to diffuse the light. Finally, the LCD comes on the top. The layers are glued together with a double-sided tape.

Powering & Charging

Dintervalometer’s circuit is powered using a LiPo battery and a very low drop 3V3 voltage regulator (TPS79933). A MAX1555 Li+ battery charger IC is used to charge the battery, which also can be powered via USB.

To prevent the over-discharge of the LiPo battery, Dintervalometer monitors and measures the battery voltage every 60 seconds. The user can always see the current status of the battery on the LCD. When the battery reaches the critical voltage, a “Low battery” notification will be shown, then the device will turn off.

The voltage measuring process is done using a voltage divider and AVRs internal 1V1 voltage reference.

The following equation is used to measure the battery voltage in mV, with the known values R2=10k, R3=3k3, Vref=1100mV, ADCres=1024.

Controlling The Camera

Using the 3.5mm male jack connector, the Dintervalometer will trigger the camera to focus and to take a picture. The jack consists of three wires: ground, focus and shutter.

To focus the camera, the focus wire has to be connected to the ground. To release the camera both wires have to be connected to the ground. Dintervalometer is tested with Canon EOS 700D. It has a jack plug for remote shuttering.

The Software

The software is written in C and compiled with avr-gcc. It is divided into 6 logical modules:

  • TIMER: Initializes Timer1 and provides an interrupt based delay function.
  • BATTERY: Initializes ADC to read the battery voltage.
  • BACKLIGHT: Functions are used to control the backlight (initialize and update).
  • GPIO: Initializes IO ports for buttons, camera output, battery charger status indication, auto cut off control output.
  • LCD: It represents the pcd8544 LCD driver, it is reusable code for other projects. The driver provides the API to initialize, control, and print text on the LCD.
  • STATE: The state machine is implemented by using function pointers. Each menu state has three basic operations; show data on LCD, wait for user input, update backlight and battery status, and handle button presses/holds.
State Machine Diagram

Dintervalometer Sources

This project is published on hackady.io. Daniel had shared all the source designs and scripts online, so you can get it on its Github repository.

 

Butterfly & Ladybug, STM32L4-Based Arduino-Programable Development Boards

Arduino boards are very useful for beginners to get started with building hardware projects. But at some point, more powerful controller than the Arduino’s 8 MHz one will be needed, featuring faster clock rate, floating point engine, and rich peripherals.

As Kris Winer found, the code editors and compilers for these controllers aren’t as simple as Arduino IDE. So using them may be a very frustrating experience.

Kris collaborated with Thomas Roell to solve that by developing new development boards that allow developers to use and program STM32L4 MCUs with the simplicity of Arduino IDE.

They started on Tindie with Dragonfly, a small (0.7” x 1.4”) development board for the high-performance, ultra-low-power line of 32-bit microcontrollers, STM32L4X6 family. Dragonfly uses the STM32L476RE 64-pin LQFP chip package with 512 kB of high-speed flash memory, 128 kB SRAM, running at up to 80 MHz with a single-precision floating point unit.

Dragonfly Development Baord

Two new boards are added to the Dragonfly family, the Butterfly and the Ladybug. These boards are small, low-cost development boards with simple, open-source designs that will allow approximately anyone to make use of the STM32L4 in their own custom applications. They rely on a single, inexpensive 32.768 kHz crystal oscillator and don’t require the ST-Link built into the STM32 Nucleo boards. Applications can be developed using the Butterfly and Ladybug development boards which provide access to all GPIOs and peripherals of the STM32L4.

Butterfly (Top) & Ladybug (Down) Development Boards

The Butterfly is 0.7” x 1.4” board and it uses the STM32L433 80 MHz ARM Cortex M4F 48-pin QFN package. While the Ladybug is 0.6” x 1.1” and uses the STM32L432 QFN package for more rational routing.

Technical specifications:

  • Microcontroller: STM32L4 ARM Cortex M4F
  • Clock speed: 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, 32, 48, 64, 80 MHz
  • Operating voltage: 3.3V
  • I/O pin limits: most pins 5.0 V tolerant, 20 mA
  • Digital I/O pins: 22, with 11 PWM (Butterfly), 13, with 10 PWM (Ladybug)
  • Analog input pins: 6 (Butterfly), 5 (Ladybug), 12-bit ADC channels
  • Analog output pins: 2 12-bit DAC
  • RTC: 1 ppm accuracy
  • Flash memory: 256 KB SRAM: 64 KB
  • Voltage regulator: 3.3-5.5V input / 3.3V, 150 mA output
  • Dimensions: 1.4 x 0.7″ (Butterfly), 1.1 x 0.6″ (Ladybug)

A kickstarter campaign had been launched to increase the production volume to allow rock bottom pricing. But unfortunately, the campaign ended without reaching the specified goal.

Butterfly and Ladybug were designed for ultra-low-power applications and for small LiPo battery operation. There is a port for a JST battery connector on the board as well as a Vin at the board edge that connects to the battery anode so peripherals like haptic motors or displays can be powered directly from the battery, or the board can be directly powered from Vin.

Butterfly Board Pinout
Ladybug Board Pinout

The boards are fully open source so anyone can get the source files and make his own easily. To find more details about the project visit its page at hackaday, and at OSH Park.

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The New Fujitsu ReRam

Resistive random-access memory (RRAM or ReRAM) is a type of non-volatile (NV) random-access (RAM) computer memory that works by changing the resistance across a dielectric solid-state material often referred to as a memristor.

Fujitsu Semiconductor has just launched world’s largest density 4 Mbit ReRAM product for mass production: MB85AS4MT. Partnering with Panasonic Semiconductor Solutions, this chip came to life.

The MB85AS4MT is an SPI-interface ReRAM product that operates with a wide range of power supply voltage, from 1.65V to 3.6V. It features an extremely small average current in read operations of 0.2mA at a maximum operating frequency of 5MHz.

It is optimal for battery operated wearable devices and medical devices such as hearing aids, which require high density, low power consumption electronic components.

20161029154434_mb85as4mt

Main Specifications
  • Memory Density (configuration): 4 Mbit (512K words x 8 bits)
  • Interface: Serial peripheral interface (SPI)
  • Operating power supply voltage: 1.65V – 3.6V
  • Low power consumption:
    • Read operating current: 0.2mA (at 5MHz)
    • Write operating current: 1.3mA (during write cycle time)
    • Standby current: 10µA
    • Sleep current: 2µA
  • Guaranteed write cycles: 1.2 million cycles
  • Guaranteed read cycles: Unlimited
  • Write cycle time (256 byte page): 16ms (with 100% data inversion)
  • Data retention: 10 years (up to 85°C)
  • Package: 209 mil 8-pin SOP

This figure shows the block diagram of the chip:

reram

MB85AS4MT is suitable for lots of applications like medical devices, and IoT devices such as meters and sensors. In addition, the chip has the industry’s lowest power consumption for read operations in non-volatile memory.

For more information about MB85AS4MT, you can check the datasheet and the official website.

MDBT42Q, nRF52832-based BLE module

The open hardware innovation platform Seeedstudio produces the MDBT42Q, a Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) module. It is a BT 4.0, BT 4.1 and BT 4.2 module designed based on Nordic nRF52832 SoC, a powerful, highly flexible ultra-low power multiprotocol SoC ideally suited for Bluetooth low energy, ANT and 2.4GHz ultra low-power wireless applications.

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MDBT42Q features a dual transmission mode of BLE and 2.4 GHz RF with over 80 meters working distance in open space. It is a 16 x 10 x 2.2 mm board which contains GPIO, SPI, UART, I2C, I2S, PWM and ADC interfaces for connecting peripherals and sensors.

nrf52832_mediumThe nRF52832 SoC is built around a 32-bit ARM® Cortex™-M4F CPU with 512kB and 64kB RAM. The embedded 2.4GHz transceiver supports Bluetooth low energy, ANT and proprietary 2.4 GHz protocol stack. It is on air compatible with the nRF51 Series, nRF24L and nRF24AP Series products from Nordic Semiconductor.

MDBT42Q Specifications:

  • Multi-protocol 2.4GHz radio
  • 32-bit ARM Cortex – M4F processor
  • 512KB flash programmed memory and 64KB RAM
  • Software stacks available as downloads
  • Application development independent from protocol stack
  • On-air compatible with nRF51, nRF24AP and nRF24L series
  • Programmable output power from +4dBm to -20dBm
  • RAM mapped FIFOs using EasyDMA
  • Dynamic on-air payload length up to 256 bytes
  • Flexible and configurable 32 pin GPIO
  • Simple ON / OFF global power mode
  • Full set of digital interface all with Easy DMA including:
  • 3 x Hardware SPI master ; 3 x Hardware SPI slave
  • 2 x two-wire master ; 2 x two-wire slave
  • 1 x UART (CTS / RTS)
  • PDM for digital microphone
  • I2S for audio
  • 12-bit / 200KSPS ADC
  • 128-bit AES ECB / CCM / AAR co-processor
  • Lowe cost external crystal 32MHz ± 40ppm for Bluetooth ; ± 50ppm for ANT Plus
  • Lowe power 32MHz crystal and RC oscillators
  • Wide supply voltage range 1.7V to 3.6V
  • On-chip DC/DC buck converter
  • Individual power management for all peripherals
  • Timer counter
  • 3 x 24-bit RTC
  • NFC-A tag interface for OOB pairing
  • RoHS and REACH compliant

pcb

This BLE module can be used in a wide range of applications, such as Internet of Things (IoT), Personal Area Networks, Interactive entertainment devices, Beacons, A4WP wireless chargers and devices, Remote control toys, and computer peripherals and I/O devices.

Full specifications, datasheet, and product documents are available at seeedstudio store, it can be backordered for only $10.

Introducing Autodesk Circuits Simulator For Beginner

Circuits.io is an online platform created by Autodesk for hardware hackers. It provides a browser-based application for designing, simulating electronic circuits and creating PCB boards. Autodesk circuits simulator can simulate Arduino-based projects for testing designs and programs before creating them in real life.

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The simulator allows you to learn electronics using a virtual Arduino board and breadboard without blowing up capacitors or burning yourself with solder on your work table. It is free to use, but more features are available with premium accounts. To start using circuits.io just go to the website, create an account, and start building your circuit.

This instructable guides you to get familiar using the simulator through three different projects. You will only need a computer with internet access, and you can build these projects in real if you have the components.

In this tutorial you will work with these parts:

  • Arduino Board, the brain of your circuits.
  • Breadboard, the board where you will connect the elements.
  • Breadboard wires.
  • Resistors.
  • LEDs.
  • Potentiometer.
  • LCD.
  • DC motor.

The first project is simple and easy, it is about making a LED turn on and off continuously. The circuit consists of only one resistor and one LED connected with the Arduino, which will turn the LED on and off for a period of time defined in the code.

blink

Another simple project is based on the LCD (Liquid Crystal Display) which receives information from Arduino and displays it. You can program the Arduino to display a message you want, control its location, make it blink, or move the message on the screen. You will also use a resistor and a potentiometer to control the brightness of the backlight.

lcd

In the third project you will control DC motor speed and its spins in Autodesk Circuits. The motor must be fed by an external power source, and the Arduino will control the current flow to the motor through the TIP120 transistor.

motor

The full instructions and guides are available in this instructable. When you finish making these projects you can explore the simulator features and components, and start building your own projects.

ArduWorm, Arduino Yún Malware

Since Internet of Things market is growing exponentially and the use of embedded and pervasive devices is increasing, this may introduces some security threats in the network.

A group of Spanish researchers at the Computer Security Lab, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid have developed a malware, ArduWorm, that targets Arduino Yún, a common platform used in IoT. This malware can bypass all the security provided within Arduino by causing a memory corruption. According to the researchers this malware will be “able to get the control of a Linux-based microprocessor integrated in the device with full privileges, which allows it to install a backdoor and spread as a worm through the compromised network”.

Modern smart devices such as smart phones or tablets are used in social networking, instant messaging or e-commerce. Therefore, these devices store a huge amount of personal and valuable information that is attractive for attackers.

arduino-yun-designboom01

Arduino Yún, is an Arduino board that was specifically designed for IoT applications. It contains an Atheros Microprocessor (MPU) holding a Linux based OpenWrt operating system. This Atheros MPU manages one Ethernet interface and one Wifi card, which make it a suitable device for IoT scenarios. The board has a USB-A port, micro-SD card slot, 20 digital input/output pins, a 16MHz crystal oscillator, a micro USB connection, an ICSP header, and 3 reset buttons.

A security analysis of the Arduino Yún shows that it contains many architectural flaws and since this AVR-based chip has limited resources compared with modern MCU and MPU based on ARM or x86 architectures, classical protections against memory corruption, such as stack overflow protection or memory layout randomization can not be easily deployed.

Schematic view of AVR memories
Schematic view of AVR memories

The key of this hack is to get the AVR to run out of RAM. Researchers wrote more and more data into memory until they reached the heap, the memory for control data.
Although the code you want to run is available in flash and it is immutable, recent researches proved that using Return-Oriented Programming (ROP) could inject code into the flash memory. These kind of ROP tricks came in handy for the researchers to write a worm.

Thus, the exploit uses code reuse attacks (Return Oriented Programming and return to-lib) to benefit from a memory corruption vulnerability. ArduWorm has also some infection capabilities and it can automatically spread through neighbor nodes.

During the last few years, malware in tablets and smartphone devices has become one of the main concerns of security researchers. According to Mcafee’s 2015 threat reports up to 1.2 million different malware pieces targeting mobile platforms were detected. A similar report published by the AV company PandaLabs, stated that during 2015 an average of 230.000 different samples were detected on a daily basis.

Researchers are developing ArduWorm as a proof of concept proven in their experimental setup, and they hope that it can motivate research in the design of defensive mechanisms for Arduino and IoT devices.

More details about this malware proof of concept are available at this research paper.

Turn Your Raspberry Pi Into A Wi-Fi Drone Disabler

Note: The information presented here is for educational purposes. This tutorial is designed to help users understand the security implications of using unprotected wireless communications by exploring its use in a popular drone model: the Parrot AR.Drone 2.0. It’s illegal to access computer systems that you don’t own or to damage other people’s property, the techniques should only be performed on devices that you own or have permission to operate on.

Using a Raspberry Pi with a touchscreen, and running a couple of simple Bash scripts, Brent Chapman built a device that will drop Wi-Fi controlled drones right out of the sky with just a tap of your finger.

wifijammer

The device concept is finding the unsecured Wi-Fi access point used by the pilot smartphone or tablet to control the drone, then log on to the drone’s default gateway address, and shuts down the system from the inside without the pilot knowing.

This will only work on some models of drones which use Wi-Fi as the interface between the controller and the drone, such as Parrot’s Bebop and AR.Drone 2.0, that are entirely controlled via Wi-Fi.

The AR.Drone 2.0 is an ideal platform for experimentation and learning thanks to its many impressive features and sensors plus its low cost. It creates an access point named “ardrone2_” followed by a random number, that the user can connect to via a smartphone. This access point is open by default with no authentication or encryption. Once a user connects the device to the access point, he or she can launch the app to begin control of the drone.

raspberry_pi_2298-15

At first, you have to connect the Raspberry Pi with a touchscreen, this guide by adafruit might be helpful. When they are ready, the next step is preparing couple of bash scripts. The first is named “join_network.sh”, and it used to make the Pi automatically join the AR.Drone 2.0 access point.

image4

The second script is named “poweroff.sh”,it will initiate a telnet connection to the drone, then send the command of poweroff, which tells the drone to shut everything down.

image6

The last step is building a “Cantenna”, a DIY directional antenna made of a can to boost the wireless signal. You just need to drill a hole on an empty can to hold a N connector then connect it to Wi-Fi card.

cantenna6

Keep in mind, you should only try this tool on your own personal drones safely and at your own risk. You can find the complete guide at this link at makezine.

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Printable Circuits by PragmatIC Changing the IoT Future

pragmatic-technologyPragmatIC is a world leader in manufacturing ultra low cost flexible electronics enabling the potential for trillions of “smart objects” that can interact with their environment.

It has developed a unique platform of patented technologies to design and manufacture flexible integrated circuits (flexICs), also known as “printed logic”.
These flexICs deliver intelligent electronics without the need for rigid, bulky and expensive silicon chips and can be easily embedded in any surface, introducing interactivity into a wide range of everyday items.

PragmatIC’s unique advantage derives from several key innovations:

  • Functional electronic materials that are much cheaper than silicon, and able to be formed on flexible plastic substrates in extremely thin films – less than 100 nm thick, about 1000 times thinner than a human hair!
  • Patterning processes that are able to accurately define features in these thin film materials, also at very fine scale (less than 100 nm), but are dramatically simpler and faster than the processes used in an expensive silicon fabrication plant.
  • Novel architectures for transistors (and other key electronic devices) that ensure perfect alignment of all critical device features, even when fabricated on plastic substrates that expand, contract or move during processing.

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Now PragmatIC is developing FlexLogIC: a unique “fab-in-a-box” model for low capital, high capacity manufacturing of flexICs. This model will allow PragmatIC to scale up production capacity dramatically, and specifically to do so with a very low capital cost and per-unit production cost, as well as automating the complete process to allow it to sell this equipment to supply chain partners.

“We incorporated the processes that we developed for our ICs and created the FlexLogIC system to manufacture our products” PragmatIC CEO Scott White said. “FlexLogIC incorporates a mix of printing and conventional techniques that deliver the optimum process for each step of production, along with full automation of the end-to-end manufacturing process.”

 

Concept drawing of FlexLogIC system
Concept drawing of FlexLogIC system

FlexLogIC offers important advantages, beginning with its high capacity that can produce billions of flexible ICs. There is a low up-front capital cost that White said is 100 to 1000 times less than a silicon fab, and a low production cost of less than 1 cent per flexIC for typical applications!

FlexLogIC production costs vs Silicon
FlexLogIC production costs vs Silicon

In addition, FlexLogIC will offer a fast production cycle time of less than 24 hours versus typically more than one month for a silicon fab, allows modular scalability of capacity in geographically diverse supply chains and also allows non-electronics companies the capability to integrate manufacturing of intelligent flexible electronics.

“One of the most compelling aspects of our flexIC production process is the potential for it to be implemented in a self-contained, fully automated manufacturing system,” White added. “It has many similarities with the production of optical discs, which several decades ago migrated very successfully from batch production in a cleanroom to this type of modular manufacturing equipment.”

The company promises that its technology will change the game for IoT and will, according to Mike Muller, CTO of ARM, “open up a whole new world of computing”.
It has attracted funding of £18 million (UK Pounds) to take the technology to production readiness.  As shown in the timeline, the first FlexLogIC production system will be installed in 2017 in order to support mass-market applications by 2018.

timeline

More details and updates about this project can be reached at flexlogic.systems and www.pragmaticprinting.com

Turn your Zero Pi into a USB Dongle

The $5 Raspberry Pi Zero is a standalone computer that can be embedded in various applications, but maybe now it is time to add some extra features.

It comes with a USB OTG port, meaning it can function as a USB device rather than a USB host. Thus, it can become a serial device with just a USB cable, an Ethernet device, MIDI device, camera, or just about anything else you can plug into a USB port.

Novaspirit has turned his Raspberry Pi Zero into a USB gadget, just like a RNDIS modem, with some easy steps. He aims to get the maximum benefit out of a Pi Zero without having to lug around any cables: “Just plug it in and you’re networked”

His hack turned the Zero Pi into a USB dongle with shared internet, and he could install services like webmin, owncloud, and vnc making it a great all-in-one device!

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With minimal soldering, he converted the Zero’s onboard female USB jacks into a male USB plug.

You only need:

  • male usb connector
  • 4 wires
  • some soldering skills

wireing

Then you can follow the diagram to connect the male connector to Zero Pi

How to ‘donglify’ the Raspberry Zero Pi as Novaspirit suggests

  1. Attach the Raspberry Pi Zero running Pixel OS to your computer as a USB network device
  2. Set up VNC (Virtual Network Computing) on the Pi so that you can log into its desktop in a window
  3. Set up networking on the Pi so that it can connect to the wider Internet through the laptop
  4. Install OwnCloud so that the Zero serves as a cloud storage

Check out this tutorial by Novaspirit

Novaspirit guy is not the first who converted the Raspberry Pi Zero into a USB gadget that connects to the internet, but the most interesting thing about his project that you won’t lose any functionality of you Zero Pi; you can still plug your stuff and use it in your applications. In addition, he delivered a very simple hardware hack and easy to follow software tutorial on Windows.

You can check his website Novaspirit for weekly posts where you can find loads of projects and tutorials.
More details, designs and code snippets of this project can be reached here.

Water Tank Overflow Alarm System Using ESP8266

Sometimes the float valve of a water tank may not work properly causing water to overflow and spread across the floor. Peter Jennings faced this problem in his storage area, and he had developed an alarm device to notify him when the water exceeds its normal range.

Peter’s project includes a simple water sensor and ESP8266 wifi module connected with power switch circuit. When the water reach a specific threshold, the sensor will trig the switch to turn on the ESP8266, which will connect to a wireless network and send a message to a web server.

ESP8266 is a wifi module contains System-On-Chip (SOC) with integrated TCP/IP protocol stack that can give any microcontroller access to any WiFi network. The ESP8266 is capable of either hosting an application or offloading all Wi-Fi networking functions from another application processor. There are various versions of ESP8266 differ in size, shape and price. Peter used this $1.5 module, and you you are free in choosing your ESP8266 board.

ESP8266 ESP-01 Board
ESP8266 ESP-01 Board

Mini Pushbutton Power Switch from Pololu, an electronics manufacturer and an online retailer, is the power switch circuit used in this project. It is a $4 power control alternative to bulky mechanical switches which is able to turn on and off any device using the mini push button on the board, the external on & off pins, or a control signal. This low-voltage version operates from 2.2 V to 20 V and can deliver continuous currents up to around 6 A.

Mini Pushbutton Power Switch Board and Dimensions
Mini Pushbutton Power Switch Board and Dimensions

sensorThe sensor which is used to detect the overflow is very simple, it is just two wires pinned inside the tank above the highest level that water should reach. One of these wires is connected t
o the Vin pin, and the other is connected to CTRL pin on the switch circuit. DC current will flow between the two wires when the water pass the limit sending a control signal to turn on the Wifi module.

This combination is powered by a range of 3 volts to 3.6 volts battery pack. The circuits should be connected as shown in the diagram:

water_sensor_esp8266_circuit

You have to create your own web server which will receive the message from the ESP8266 and notify you. If you are not familiar with web development you can use IFTTT, a free web-based service that allows users to create chains of simple conditional statements which are triggered based on changes to other web services.

To use IFTTT, you have to create your own account, then proceed to the Maker Channel to create a Trigger event. IFTTT will give you the URL to enter into the ESP8266 code. You can set the alarm to run a ringtone on your android device, tweet on your twitter account, post in facebook, send an email, and a lot of other choices.

ifttt

There are also many ways to program the ESP8266. Peter used the simple NodeMCU Lua system, but for Arduino fans there is an Arduino firmware installation available for the ESP8266 which can also be used to implement the simple firmware required.

Additional information and other resources are reachable at the project page. You can also find some useful tutorials and links about using the ESP8266 and LuaLoader or getting started with ESP8266 on Peter’s website.