IoT category

LoRa IOT Home Environment Monitoring System

RodNewHampshire @ instructables.com writes:

The LoRa IOT Home Environmental Monitoring System consists of an Arduino Mega based IOT-to-Internet gateway and Arduino Feather based remote stations with environmental sensors. The remote stations communicate wirelessly with the gateway using LoRa radios.

LoRa IOT Home Environment Monitoring System – [Link]

Easy IoT Weather Station With Multiple Sensors

Ingenerare @ instructables.com show us an easy to build IoT weather station able to measure temperature, dew point, humidity, pressure, light index, and rain. He writes:

A weather station is a fun project that teaches you a ton about electronics with the added benefit being an actually useful little device. The project requires a bunch of cheap parts and sensors totaling less than $15, and the whole thing ends up fitting in your hand. The station creates a web site that monitors temperature, dew point, humidity, pressure, light index, and rain (Thingspeak channel). It’s a pretty easy set up, and you’ll just need some basic electronics skills to get it going.

Easy IoT Weather Station With Multiple Sensors – [Link]

Multichannel Wireless Light Dimmer

abhishek123 @ instructables.com writes:

This project aims to

Control the intensity of the dimmable lighting appliances via a trailing edge dimmer.

Provide the user , ability to control lightsindependently and wirelessly over the Wi-Fi network and the Internet!

Multichannel Wireless Light Dimmer – [Link]

Development board targets IoT and is Arduino compatible

Graham Prophet @ eedesignnewseurope.com discuss about a new IoT board to the market.

Distributor Arrow Electronics has extended its range of IoT development boards with the SmartEverything Panther. The Panther board enables users to add pattern recognition capabilities to their products to allow them to recognise gestures, sound and vibration patterns and then to link them to the cloud via Wi-Fi for monitoring and control purposes.

Development board targets IoT and is Arduino compatible – [Link]

Zephyr Project Hosted by Linux Foundation — Yet Another RTOS for IoT

What is Zephyr?

Zephyr is a small footprint IoT RTOS (less than 10kB) with no user-space and dynamic allocation which make it suitable to run on resource-constrained platforms. Moreover, it’s modular and supports multiple architectures, including ARM, X86,ARC, NIOS-II and others).

Zephyr is an open source project under Apache 2.0 License and hosted by Linux Foundation. However, Being hosted by Linux Foundation doesn’t mean that Zephyr project is a scaled version of linux OS.

As connectivity is one of the main concerns in IoT, Zephyr provides support for IEEE 802.15.4, Bluetooth V4.0, NFC, WiFi and 3GPP. While security is another concern it also provides a cryptographic library based on TinyCrypt2 and mbedTLS.

Why is Zephyr?

Zephyr claims that its kernel offers a number of features that distinguish it from other small-footprint Oses. Zephyr works on single address-space, where both the application and kernel are combined on a single image and execute in a single address-space; they like to call this feature as library-based RTOS (“kernel-less”) so there is no need for dynamic loading at run-time . Moreover, Zephyr has two Kernel modes : “Nanokernel” — with limited functionality targeting small footprint (below 10k) and “Microkernel” — a superset of nanokernel.

Where is Zepher?

Zepher supports variety of architectures and development boards including X86 boards like MinnowBoard, Genuino 101, Quark D2000 and others; and ARM boards like Arduino Due, ST Nucleo F401RE and others.

The Development Environment supports Windows, Linux and MAC OS. To get started with Zephyr, refer to the official getting started page.
This young and fresh RTOS is already adapted by commercial products like Grush — an interactive Bluetooth toothbrush.

 

Add WiFi & Bluetooth Easily With Koala® Connect Modules

Clarinox Technologies Pty Ltd was formed with the aim of providing cost effective and innovative wireless embedded systems solutions to business. Due to the experience of the Clarinox team, more embedded systems are designed to develop leading edge solutions. In addition to delivering flexible and robust wireless protocol software for embedded systems developments.

Clarinox hottest products are Koala® Connect Modules! A compact option for adding Wi-Fi® and / or Bluetooth® to new and existing projects.

These modules will give you a stable environment while used with Koala® EVM, the first and only development board to support development for all major wireless technologies. It enables embedded systems developers to create both low and high power wireless systems communicating over Wi-Fi, Bluetooth Classic and Bluetooth Low Energy. It provides a fast and cost effective way to commence embedded wireless development with all major wireless technologies.

Each module features a single onboard processor to drive the user application in addition to multiple wireless protocols. The modules available are:

Koala® Connect Modules
KM-141201 (20 x 30mm BT/BLE)
KM-153101 (20 x 34mm Wi-Fi+BT/BLE)

Carrier Board for Koala® Connect
KC-018102

Sensor Modules
KM-990501 Sensor Board

The Koala EVM and wireless module family will help shorten development time, reduce development costs, and open the door to new possibilities for wireless device features.

And these are the specifications

Hardware Specifications

MCU: STM32F411 (Bluetooth/BLE), STM32F412 (Wi-Fi + Bluetooth/BLE)

Wi-Fi Radio: TI WL1831MOD / WL1837MOD

  • 802.11 a/b/g/n
  • 2.4 GHz & 5 GHz
  • -96.3dBm RX Sensitivity
  • STA, AP & Wi-Fi Direct Modes

Bluetooth / Bluetooth LE Radio: TI WL1831MOD / WL1837MOD

  • Dual-mode Bluetooth & Bluetooth Low Energy
  • Bluetooth v4.1 Compliance and CSA2 Support
  • Host Controller Interface (HCI) Transport for Bluetooth Over UART

I/O Signals: ADC, GPIO, I2C, I2S, SPI, UART, USB

Industrial Temperature Grade: -40°C to +85°C

Software Specifications

Supported Technologies: Wi-Fi WLAN, Wi-Fi Direct Concurrent Operation (Multichannel, Multirole), Bluetooth, Bluetooth LE

You can get your own products from Clarinox by filling this inquiry. More details about Koala Connect Modules are available here, also a start manual for KoalaEVM is available here.

Early Diagnosis Now Possible With Smart Bandage

IoE era is here since we are able now to add mobile radio capabilities in our applications! The latest incarnation of the cell phone network will offer internet connectivity and possibilities that could only be dreamt of previously depending on your standpoint, and many more factors.

And now let’s embed these concept in medical applications, like “Smart Bandage” . It is conceivable that sensors embedded in a medical dressing could continuously monitor the wound healing process and send alerts to medical personnel when an infection is detected.  Maybe the patient could not tell accurately  since the pain is not a valid indicator of biological dysfunction. The problem is that we all have different thresholds; some stalwarts may endure the pain and only end up visiting a doctor as a last resort when the simple infection has developed into something nastier. Other patients will be convinced that a slight twinge is evidence of a life threatening condition. An objective assessment of the patient’s state of health will not only be reassuring to the patient, but also lead to a more efficient use of medical resources and reduced health care costs.

For this reason, band-aids with sensors and 5G network interfaces seem like a win-win formula. They will give the doctor an early indication of problems and may even be able to run rudimentary diagnostics to indicate the cause of the problem. Instead of long waiting times for appointments and expensive laboratory tests we could, for example get an immediate recommendation of an effective antibiotic. This is just one small example of the many benefits that the IoE will eventually bring to medical care in the future.

“That intelligent dressing uses nano-technology to sense the state of that wound at any one specific time. It would connect that wound to a 5G infrastructure and that infrastructure through your telephone will also know things about you – where you are, how active you are at any one time. You combine all of that intelligence so the clinician knows the performance of the specific wound at any specific time and can then tailor the treatment protocol to the individual and wound in question.” – Prof Marc Clement, chairman of the Institute of Life Science (ILS).

 

Via: Elektor

ESP32 Web Server – Arduino IDE

Rui @ randomnerdtutorials.com tipped us with his latest project. He writes:

In this project you’ll create a standalone web server with an ESP32 that can toggle two LEDs using the Arduino IDE programming environment. If you want to learn more about the ESP32 dev board, read my Getting Started Guide with ESP32.

ESP32 Web Server – Arduino IDE – [Link]

ESPurna-H, A Compact Open Source Hardware Wireless Power Wall Switch

Controlling your AC loads using wireless power switch is not a new concept. Several commercial products from several vendors can be found on the market such as Xiaomi’s Mi Smart Socket Plug, SAMSUNG’s SmartThings Power Outlet and Sonoff Pow WiFi Switch from ITEAD.

Using ESP8266 makes the building of a customized WiFi power switch more affordable especially if you start with Sonoff Pow WiFi Switch design and you use a special Arduino C firmware called ESPurna developed by Xose (tinkerman) which is an open source firmware for ESP8266 based wireless switches such as Sonoff POW and many others.

After Xose has built the software ــ ESPurna, he decided to build his own smart switch board to meet his special needs. ESPurna-H electronic design is very similar to Sonoff POW’s one; it uses ESP12 module as a controller and as WiFi transceiver.

ESPurna-H
ESPurna-H

AC power monitoring is done using HLW8012 IC which is also present in Sonoff POW. This IC monitors both voltage and current of the AC power, and output RMS voltage, current and active power encoded as a 50% duty cycle square wave where the frequency is proportional to the magnitude. I should mention that ESPurna supports interfacing with HLW8012. In addition AC load is enabled/disabled by using a 10A relay.

ESPurna-H uses HLK-PM01 AC-DC step-down power supply module. The 100-240 VAC input range so the board can be used anywhere in the world and the good performance made Xeos select this module.

HLK-PM01
HLK-PM01
HLK-PM01 Inside (Image Source ــ lygte-info.dk )
HLK-PM01 Inside (Image Source ــ lygte-info.dk )
HLK-PM01 Inside (Image Source ــ lygte-info.dk )
HLK-PM01 Inside (Image Source ــ lygte-info.dk )

ESPurna-H has another option to enable/disable the relay using a capacitive touch switch using TTP223 module.

Xose designed the board with Eagle CAD and released the schematics, PCB layout and other hardware design files on Github.

Source: cnx-software

10km ESP32 WiFi Using Directional Antenna

[Jeija] was playing with some ESP32s and in true hacker fashion, he wondered how far he could pull them apart and still get data flowing. His video answer to that question covers the Friis equation and has a lot of good examples of using the equation, decibels, and even a practical example that covers about 10km. You can see the video below.

Of course, to get that kind of range you need a directional antenna. To avoid violating regulations that control transmit power, he’s using the antenna on the receiving end. That also means he had to hack the ESP32 WiFi stack to make the device listen only on one side. The hack involves putting the device in promiscuous mode and only monitoring the signals being sent. You can find the code involved on GitHub (complete with a rickrolling application).

Of course, antennas are nothing new–look at all the Pringle can antennas we’ve seen in the past. However, the use of a long range receive-only module is interesting and we can see this technique having applications to remote drone video or telemetry and — of course — wardriving. If you don’t have a big boss antenna lying around, you might try some duct tape. If you want a more detailed refresher on decibels, we did that last month.

Source: Hackaday