IoT category

A nRF52840-MDK IoT Development Kit For Bluetooth 5 Applications

Bluetooth Low Energy and the Internet of things is believed to be the perfect matchmaking. Even though Bluetooth doesn’t necessary gives devices the ability to connect to the Internet they still have so much capacity. The Bluetooth Low Energy enabled solutions will increase the functionality of IoT Systems, by creating a reliable framework and efficient connectivity for the devices. Devices can use BLE to connect to each other thereby improving reliability, increasing range, mitigate security risk, reduce cost, and most importantly improve battery life.

The launch of the Bluetooth 5, which promise so much more are beginning to see some adoption in the open hardware industry, and a good example is the Particle Xenon using the Nordic nRF52840 SOC. The Nordic nRF52840 SoC is designed around an ARM Cortex-M4 CPU and comes with a 1 MB flash with cache and a 256kB of RAM.

The Makediary nRF52840 board
The Makediary nRF52840 MDK IoT Development Board

Nordic recently announced that the nRF52840 now supports concurrent Thread and Bluetooth 5 wireless connectivity eliminating the previous requirement of disconnecting from one of the networks before connecting to the other. So, the potential from this announcement is enormous.

Recognising the possibility of Bluetooth 5 in addition to Thread connectivity, the teams at Makerdiary has launched a new development kit for the nRF52840 SoC called the nRF52840-MDK IoT Development Kit

The Makediary nRF52840 MDK IoT Development Kit is a kit that will allow developers to explore Bluetooth 5, Bluetooth MeshThreadIEEE 802.15.4ANT and 2.4GHz proprietary wireless applications using the nRF52840 SoC. The kit comes integrated with the DAPLink debugger which provides a USB drag-and-drop programming, USB Virtual COM port and CMSIS-DAP interface.

The kit supports quite some software frameworks such as the  nRF5 SDK, nRF5 SDK for Mesh, OpenThread, ZigBee 3.0, Mbed OS 5, Zephyr, Mynewt, Web Bluetooth, iBeacon, Eddystone, and others. It works with the standard Nordic Software Development Tool-chain using GCC, Keil and IAR.

One significant take note of the board is the USB type C port available, a rare port used for hardware boards. The development board put up a ton of features like an ultra-low power 64-Mb QSPI FLASH memory, programmable user button, RGB LED, up to 24 GPIOs, antenna selection for custom applications.

Below are some of the device specifications:

  • SoC – Nordic nRF52840 Arm Cortex-M4F WiSoC with 1 MB FLASH and 256 kB RAM, Arm TrustZone Cryptocell 310 security subsystem
  • External Storage – 64-Mbit QSPI flash
  • Wireless Connectivity (on-chip)
    • Bluetooth 5, Bluetooth Mesh
    • Thread, IEEE 802.15.4
    • ANT, 2.4GHz proprietary
    • On-chip NFC-A tag
    • An on-board 2.4G chip antenna
    • u.FL connector selectable for an external antenna
  • Programming / Debugging with DAPLink
    • MSC – drag-n-drop programming flash memory
    • CDC – virtual com port for log, trace and terminal emulation
    • HID – CMSIS-DAP compliant debug channel
    • WEBUSB HID – CMSIS-DAP compliant debug channel
  • USB – 1x USB type C port for power and programming
  • Expansion – 2x 18-pin breadboard-friendly headers with 24 GPIOs,   I2C, QSPI, UART, 6x analog input pins, SWD/JTAG, and power signals (VIN, GND, 3.3V, 5V)
  • Misc – Boot/Reset Button, User button and user RGB LED
  • Power Supply – 5V via USB type C connector; 3.3V regulator with 1A peak current output; VBUS & VIN Power-Path Management
  • Dimensions – 50mm x 23mm x 13mm with headers

Although the development board is an open source board and the design files are already available on Github, it is advisable you purchase the board to support them. Makerdiary nRF52840-MDK can be purchased for $42.90 on Seeed Studio, or directly on Makerdiary’s online store.

ESP32 with multiple DS18B20 temperature sensors

Guide to ESP32 with multiple DS18B20 temperature sensors from Random Nerd Tutorials:

This guide shows how to read temperature from multiple DS18B20 temperature sensors with the ESP32 using Arduino IDE. We’ll show you how to wire the sensors on the same data bus to the ESP32, install the needed libraries, and a sketch example you can use in your own projects. This tutorial is also compatible with the ESP8266 and the Arduino boards.

ESP32 with multiple DS18B20 temperature sensors – [Link]

Cellular IoT with Blynk & Hologram

Use a $9 GSM module & the Hologram network to remotely control any Arduino with Blynk App.

Blynk is an awesome tool that allows you to build drag and drop apps for controlling hardware remotely! Its perfect for quickly creating useful IoT projects. This tutorial will run you through setting up Blynk for cellular control using an Arduino and a $9 GSM board.

Hologram.io is a cellular network provider perfect for makers. At $0.60 /mo plus $0.40 per mb, you’ll have plenty of data for most IoT projects.

Cellular IoT with Blynk & Hologram – [Link]

LoraDunchy – Arduino Compatibile LoRa module

Lora board with Arduino nano compatibile pinout and simple battery management. Small board with arduino nano compatibile pinout with power management and Murata ABZ LoRa module with STM32L0 microcontroller

Features:

  • LoRa module: Murata ABZ
  • Single cell LiPo cell charger on-board with charging signal internally connected to PA11 (via jumper)
  • Buck/Boost switching power supply for delivering stable 3,3V regardless of the battery voltage
  • Battery fuel gauge on-board to control the real status of the battery

LoraDunchy – Arduino Compatibile LoRa module – [Link]

Ethernet Relay board

LAN interface with 4 relays, 8 programmable  I/Os and 4 analog inputs, IoT-ready.

How many times have you read or heard about the Internet of things (Iot)? The Internet of things is an expression that is becoming more and more popular lately; it represents the expansion of the Internet into the world of objects and physical locations. Thanks to this technology, many objects that used to be exclusively passive, can now become interactive and coordinate between themselves and interact with the user; they become more intelligent and thanks to the Internet connection they allow to share generated data with the user or another board that can also be in another continent. However, in this scenario, the term “intelligence” is often misused. In fact, many times the IoT includes not only electronic devices capable of making autonomous decisions in order to simplify our everyday life, but also the plethora of products that used to be stand-alone. For this reason, all we have to do is equipping our older devices with an Internet connection.

Ethernet Relay board – [Link]

LoRa-to-Ethernet Gateway

A WIZ750SR based device that allows sending and receiving messages over LoRa and LoRaWAN.

I got some LoRa modules with SPI communication interface. One of the options it would have been to connect them to my Raspberry Pi. But, I didn’t really like the idea because I already have some stuff connected to my Raspberry Pi, and this starts getting unmanageable.

So, I decided to create a LoRa-to-Ethernet gateway that I can connect directly to home router. The WIZ750SR module with its Ethernet interface and Cortex-M0 SoC it’s a great candidate for this.

LoRa-to-Ethernet Gateway – [Link]

Arduino IoT product

The Internet of Arduino Challenge – Build an IoT Arduino Powered Product and you could win up to $50,000

The Arduino has been the number one development board for hackers, hobbyists, engineers and even product designers for a while. The Arduino Movement has powered a powerful maker’s community where anyone that can think of an idea can quickly make it happen, and this has birthed several Arduino powered products.

The Internet of Things is steadily becoming the talk of the day with several millions of devices getting connected every hour. The Internet of Things is expected to disrupt our everyday lives by giving us more insight into our daily data thereby improving our lives. Imagine giving cars the ability to detect portholes on the road when driving; this data can be collected, aggregated and possibly predict the likelihood of a road accident (due to bad roads), traffic congestion, and also the overall state of the road. If this information is given to the right body, they can know what roads they should focus their resources on.

To give people the chance to build an IoT focus product, the Arduino movement has released several IoT focused boards like the Arduino MKR 1000, Arduino Yun, Arduino Vidor 4000, Arduino Industrial 101, Arduino Plus Esp8266, and several others. You can find more Arduino IoT boards here. Now, the Arduino Movement in partnership with the electronics supplier Arrow and Indiegogo wants to give more power to the maker’s community by creating an Internet of Arduino Challenge where winners can go and win up to $50,000 in funding.

The contest is all about creating an IoT product that is powered by an Arduino board. The possibilities are endless with Arduino. Pair that with the engineering and production resources from the Arrow Certification Program, and you can have the next successful Indiegogo campaign. Submit your design now for a chance to win $50,000 in funding. Entries opened May 12th, 2018, and ends August 31st, 2018.

The IoT revolution is beginning, and it will change the way we think and work. In fact, many of the mindless activities we perform on a daily or weekly basis can go away entirely, leaving us more time to read, play with the kids or go on that nice long weekend ride. It will also advance every company in the world. Companies must begin a digital transformation, or they might go out of business. Even if you don’t win the challenge, you will never lose because, in this developing IoT Industry, there is never a loser.

We are on the cusp of a new revolution. It will be very similar to when the internet began to take shape in the early 2000s. Many companies weren’t quite prepared. Some fought the revolution. Some ignored it. Those companies are no longer.

ESP32- Now With Long Range Wi-Fi

Nowadays, Wi-Fi is a word we hear often, and it is a technology that we use all the time. There are around 279 million Wi-Fi hotspots in the world, and in 2021 that number is expected to increase to 542 million hotspots. The wireless nature of this technology allows users to access a network from any convenient location. Wi-Fi chipsets are pieces of hardware designed for wireless communication and they are cheap, and readily available, but the range don’t match the expectations, and configuring its coverage is no easy task.

Support for the 802.11 LR mode in the ESP-IDF was added at the end of 2016. The 802.11 LR mode can achieve a 1 km line of sight range if both the station and the Soft-AP are connected to an ESP32 device.

ESP32 is a low cost, low power system on a chip (SoC) with Wi-Fi and Bluetooth capabilities. It was created for mobile devices, wearables electronics, and for Internet of Things applications. The devices have low power consumption. The EPS32 uses Tensilica Xtensa LX6 microprocessor and it was created by Espressif systems.

The mode was included quietly, so there has not been much talk about it, but some people noticed the inclusion, and have been testing the long-range mode in the field. Enabling the mode requires only a function call, making it easy to use. The long-range mode comes with a cost which is the data rate which is significantly reduced. In addition, a lot more can be done if the common router antenna is replaced by directional antenna.

This device has already been tested by some users for drones and long-distance applications, but there is no formal data about the device’s performance, problems, and even the applications are not clear enough. The recent increase in popularity could lead to conclusive data which could make the mode more reliable.

The applications for this includes remote drone video, telemetry (collecting data at remote or inaccessible points and transmitting it for monitoring), wardriving (finding Wi-Fi hotspots from a moving vehicle) etc. There are many possibilities, but we must give makers time to figure this new mode on their own, and to test its capabilities.

[Source]

ESP8266 (ESP-03) Based Ultra Low Power Weather Logger

Yet another ESP8266 (ESP-03) based ultra low power weather logger with 4 sensors.

Features

  • Working with two AA battery
  • Ultra low power consumption
  • 4 sensors and 6 measurements:
  • HDC1080 – Temperature & Humidity
  • LPS25HB – Pressure
  • VEML6070 – Ultraviolet Index
  • TSL2561 – Ambient & Infrared
  • Built-in 3.3v Boost Converter
  • TPL5111 System Timer (20 mins update interval, can be customized via resistors)
  • Battery voltage monitor
  • UART port for programming & debugging

ESP8266 (ESP-03) Based Ultra Low Power Weather Logger – [Link]

Arduino’s New Competitors in IoT Race

Arduino, a worldwide leader in microcontrollers and IoT has now added two new members to the family. IoT (internet of things) is a recent term used to describe common devices embedded with electronics, giving them new functionalities such as data gathering, wireless controlling etc. Arduino gave their users the ability to easily navigate through IoT world because of their user-friendly system and has launched different boards and shields throughout the years.

In May, Arduino unveiled the MKR WIFI 1010 and MKR NB 1500, two new wireless connectivity boards designed to compete in the internet of things development.

The first one is the descendant of MKR1000, but it now offers low power consumption, and comes equipped with an ESP32- based module manufactured by u-blox. This gives the board 2.4 GHz WIFI and Bluetooth connectivity.

The second one is designed to work over cellular/LTE networks and supports transmissions via AT&T, T – Mobile, Verizon etc. Additionally, it provides faster communication, and power saving because of faster wake up and connection times.

Both boards are compatible with Arduino Uno, MEGA and all MKR boards, and both operate at 3.3 v and have 22 digital I/Os and seven analog inputs. They will be available for sale in the Arduino store in June of this year.

MKR1010 is fully compatible with the Arduino cloud, and has open- source WIFI firmware with allows the user to easily edit, upgrade and fix security flaws. Also, it has two processors, one based on ARM core technology, and the other one based on dual- core Espressif IC. ECC508, a chip for crypto authentication is included for secure communication.

MKR1010 measures only 61.5 mm x 25 mm, and weights only 32 gr making it perfect for IoT projects where size might be a concern, or when the device is meant to go unnoticed. MKR NB 1500 is slightly smaller.

Internet of things has turned into a competition over fastest connections and accurate results. It has been used everywhere from architecture, to medicine and transportation.  Massimo Banzi the Arduino co-founder said,

The new boards bring new communication options to satisfy the needs of the most demanding use cases, giving users one of the widest range of options on the market of certified products

Arduino´s new MKR boards will provide users with new capabilities which will lead to more projects with better performance even in the most demanding areas of the market.