LCD category

A Compact Camera Using Raspberry Pi A+ And Adafruit TFT Display

PiJuice at instructables.com designed an interesting compact camera project with raspberry pi. Raspberry Pi A+ is used in this project as it is the cheapest and smallest available Raspberry Pi. The real challenge in this kind of portable Pi projects is powering the Raspberry Pi. This issue is solved using PiJuice—an all in one battery module for the Raspberry Pi.

Required Parts

Required parts to make Raspberry Pi compact camera
Required parts to make Raspberry Pi compact camera

Set Up The Raspberry Pi

Download the latest version of the Raspbian image from the Raspberry Pi Website and burn it on your blank SD card. You can use win32DiskImager or your favorite software to get the job done. Now, you need to install the drivers for the TFT screen by running the DIY installer script, explained on the Adafruit page. Connect the TFT to the Raspberry Pi, attach the PiJuice with a charged battery, and switch it on. Your screen now should display boot up messages.

Connect The Camera

Insert the ribbon cable of your camera module properly ensuring that the blue side of the ribbon is facing away from the HDMI port. Now, go to the terminal and type the following command,

sudo raspi-config

Enable the camera in the menu and then reboot the Pi. The camera should work properly after a successful reboot. To test the camera, enter the following command:

raspistill -o pic.jpg

This will take a snap and save it in the /home/pi directory.

Connect A Push Button

You need a push button to simulate a shutter action. Locate the pin 17 on the GPIO breakout on the top of the TFT screen. Now, solder two wires to the terminals of the push button. You can either solder a right angle header to the pin 17 or you can directly solder one wire from push button to that pin. There is a pad labeled WP on the board. It is actually connected to the ground. Solder another wire from the push button to this pad.

Install And Test The PiCam Software

To install the software, the Raspberry Pi must be connected to the internet. Enter the commands given below to download and install PiCam.

sudo apt-get install git-core
sudo mkdir PiCam
cd /PiCam
git clone git://github.com/pijuice/PiCam.git

Once the software has been downloaded, navigate to the PiCam directory using the command:

cd /picam

You can run it by typing the command:

sudo python picam.py

Now, you can take pictures by simply pressing the push button. Once the button is pressed the picture will be taken. Once the captured image gets loaded, your photograph will be displayed.

Taking photograph with Raspberry Pi compact camera
Taking photograph with Raspberry Pi compact camera

Conclusion

Your Raspberry Pi camera is ready now. If you want to make it even more compact as well as portable, grab the official laser-cut compact camera case from the Kickstarter page by pre-ordering a Maker Kit. You can also build your own simple chassis for housing the camera.

16X2 LCD Shield with LMD18201 Motor Driver

 

LCD is very important part of many DIY and industrial projects. The 16X2 LCD shield has been designed to develop LCD related projects using 28-40 Pin Pic development board or DSpic development board, along with LCD this shield includes LMD18201 DC Motor driver , 2 Trimmer potentiometer and 4 tact switches with jumpers. Jumpers can be used to connect switches to pre decided port pins or remove jumpers and connect switches to any port pin using female to female wire harness, LCD pins and H-Bridge signal inputs are open ended male header connector and can be hooked to any port pin with the help of female to female wire harness. This is a very useful shield to develop timer, measurements, dc motor driver with display, DC motor pump controller, automatic irrigation system and many more projects.

16X2 LCD Shield with LMD18201 Motor Driver – [Link]

Digital UV-meter with OLED Display

@ instructables.com build a nice VU meter using Arduino and an OLED display.

Hello, instructable. Today I will tell you how to make a simple digital VU meter (sound level meter) using Arduino and OLED displays and 2 resistors by yourself (DIY). The device is quite simple, for beginners it will be a rewarding experience.

Digital UV-meter with OLED Display – [Link]

1.3” circular AMOLED modules only 0.6mm thick

by Julien Happich @ eedesignnewseurope.com
andersDX has added a round AMOLED (Active Matrix OLED) display to its range for wearable and instrumentation applications, complementing the circular PMOLED and touchscreen modules that it already offers.

1.3” circular AMOLED modules only 0.6mm thick – [Link]

PowerPlant, A Personal Power Assistant

Imagine you won’t need electricity mains wherever you are outside! PowerPlant by Nuuq is trying to solve this issue by providing its charging mains-alike power bank. PowerPlant is light enough to be convenient to carry, suitable for you backpack and is TSA approved. Also, it is powerful enough to charge loads of device with its 95 Watts power output.

Check this video to know more about PowerPlant:

Power on the go!

Fortunately, PowerPlant includes a universal plug input, a replaceable battery, plus an inner temperature protection. In addition, it will provide you with easy read via its LCD plus fast charging. Furthermore, it has many competitive advantages compared to similar products.

To summarize, below are the full specifications of PowerPlant:

  • Universal plug for 2 & 3 pin plugs (ideal for USA, UK, Europe and Australia)
  • Output 19v/1.58A 5v 2.4A
  • Output: AC 100 – 240v/95W (max)
  • Modified Sine Wave Inverter
  • Replaceable 20100mAh lithium-Ion battery
  • 2 x 2.4A 5v fastcharge USB ports
  • 1 x USB-C
  • 1 x 19 Volt fast charge charging port
  • LCD display with battery charge, temperature, AC, DC and In/Out display
  • IP4 Splash-proof water resistance

PowerPlant is now live on a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo. Amazingly, it has achieved 500% of its goal and still has 11 days to go. Finally, PowePlant is available for $150, you can check the campaign for more details.

YouTube Subscriber Counter with Wemos D1 mini

educ8s.tv @ youtube.com uploaded a new tutorial. Nick writes:

Today we are going to build a DIY YouTube subscriber counter with a big LCD display and a 3D printed enclosure

YouTube Subscriber Counter with Wemos D1 mini – [Link]

Arduino-based GSM mobile

Lightweight GSM Mobile With Arduino UNO and Nextion Display

Avishek Hardin at Arduino Project Hub designed a lightweight mobile using a GSM module, an Arduino UNO, and a Nextion touch screen display. The lightweight mobile has the following features:

  • Make calls
  • Receive calls
  • Send SMS
  • Receive SMS
  • Delete SMS

In this project, he uses a GSM SIM900A module to establish the cellular communication. The GSM SIM900A is an all-in-one cellular module that lets you add voice, SMS, and data to embedded projects. It works on frequencies 900/1800MHz and uses the RS232 standard to communicate with MCUs. Baud rate of this module is adjustable from 9600 to 115200 through specific AT Commands.

This GSM mobile features a Nextion touch display to take input from the user and visualize the GUI. Its easy-to-use configuration software (Nextion Editor) allows you to design your own interfaces using GUI commands. All GUI data is stored in Nextion display instead of the master MCU. Thus, lots of program space in MCUs can be saved efficiently and it makes the development procedure effortless. The Nextion displays communicate with microcontrollers over UART which is supported by a wide range of MCUs.

Required Parts

Required pats for this project
Required parts for this project

Required Tools

Connection

Connect the Nextion display and the GSM module with your Arduino using following instructions:

  • Nextion +5V to Arduino VDD_5v.
  • Nextion RX to Arduino pin 11
  • Nextion Tx to Arduino pin 10
  • Nextion GND to Arduino GND_0v.
  • GSM Rx to Arduino pin 1
  • GSM TX to Arduino pin 0
  • GSM GND to Arduino GND_0v.
Wiring Diagram
Wiring Diagram of Arduino-based GSM mobile

Program The Nextion Display

First of all, you need to design an HMI file using Nextion Editor. This editor allows you to design the interfaces using plug-and-play components like text, button, progress bar, pictures, gauge, checkbox, radio box, and much more. You can set codes and properties for each of these components later.

Design GUI using Nextion Editor
Design GUI using Nextion Editor

In this project, 8 different pages are used to design the GUI. All the icons used are easily available on the internet. Icons are resized and modified using an open source tool paint.net. Touch events like press and release are also covered when components are touched. More information on Nextion display commands can be found on this wiki page.

Designing dial pad using Nextion Editor
Designing dial pad using Nextion Editor

Steps To Upload

  • Load the .HMI file into the editor. Link to the Github repository is here.
  • Compile the .HMI file (just under the menu bar).
  • Go to File > Open build folder > Copy the .tft file > Paste into SD card. Note: make sure the SD card is formatted to FAT32.
  • Once copied, insert the SD card into the Nextion display and then turn the power on.
  • Wait for the .tft to upload.
  • Power off the Nextion, securely remove the SD card and then again power on the display.
  • Now you should see your new interfaces on the Nextion Display.

Program The Arduino

The Arduino is the brain of this project. It takes input from the Nextion display, sends commands to GSM module to create the cellular connection, and shows information on the display. This project does not use any Nextion library due to lack of documentations and difficulties to understand. Moving on without using libraries seems tough but it is really not.

The code can be found on the Github repositorySimply download it and upload to the Arduino board using the Arduino IDE. If you are using some other board than Arduino UNO, then don’t forget to select that specific board in Arduino IDE before uploading.

Editing the Arduino sketch
Editing the Arduino sketch
compile and upload the sketch using Arduino IDE
compile and upload the sketch using Arduino IDE

Open the Serial Monitor, you should see the AT command log for each event triggered from the Nextion Display.

Serial Monitor shows the AT command log
Serial Monitor shows the AT command log

Important Note

By default, the GSM module has an SMS buffer size of 20. Unfortunately, this Arduino-based mobile cannot display all the 20 messages at once on the Nextion display as it gives a buffer overflow while compiling the Nextion code. Hence, the Nextion display is programmed to show maximum 10 messages at once. If 10 or more SMS are present on the GSM buffer, the Low memory warning icon will be displayed on the Nextion display.

SMS log showing received messages on Nextion display
SMS log showing received messages on Nextion display

Video

Watch the demonstration video to understand how this Arduino-based lightweight GSMmobile works.

 

Paperino, The ePaper Display Shield

ePaper displays  (EPDs) are becoming a trend in application, just like the display used in Amazon Kindle,  for their low power consumption due to the  to the underlying ‘bistable’ display technology. These displays can continue to show information without any power at all. It is only required while updating the display with new information, otherwise there won’t be any power consumption.

Providing such revolutionary displays to your applications will be a professional approach. For this, a new crowdfunding campaign is providing Paperino, an easy-to-use, micro ePaper shield for the Particle & Arduino community. Paperino simplifies driving ePaper displays with clean, simple, and short script examples.

Thanks to the plug-and-play shield for particle family, Paperino can be used with the following boards: Photon, Electron, or Bluz without manual wiring. It can also be wired easily to be connected with Arduino and other compatible boards.

Paperino Features

Glass-free Display

Paperino is lightweight and thinner than other ePaper products because it uses a glass-free ePaper display from Plastic Logic. It weighs 1.2 grams and is only 0.5 mm thick.

Supports Four Gray Levels

Unlike many other ePaper products out there, Paperino can support four gray levels instead of two (black and white).

Fast, Partial Updates

You don’t have to wait for slow, full screen updates to load. With Paperino, you can quickly update only parts of the screen.

Accelerometer

The integrated accelerometer lets you interact with your Paperino in all sorts of ways, including tap sensing. Tap sensing capability can trigger screen updates or wake up your microcontroller.

Paperino Specifications

The Paperino breakout board can be used for manually wiring your favourite, Arduino-compatible microcontroller with 3.3 V and >4kb of free RAM.

  • Resolution: 148 x 70 px
  • Pixel density: 150 ppi
  • Grey levels: 4
  • Weight: 1.2 g
  • Thickness: 500 µm
  • Power consumption: 4.5 mA (mean current for typical image update)
  • Operating conditions: 0°C .. 40°C
  • Storage conditions: -25°C .. 50°C

You can pre-order your own Paperino for $20 and with a driver board for $30. The crowdfunding campaign still has 16 days to go, and you can learn more details by checking it out.

20×4 I2C Character LCD display with Arduino Uno

Our friends on educ8s.tv published a new video! Check it out.

Hello guys, I am Nick and welcome to educ8s.tv a channel that is all about DIY electronics projects with Arduino, Raspberry Pi, ESP8266 and other popular boards. Subscribe to the channel now if you don’t want to miss any future videos. In this video we are going learn how to use this inexpensive character LCD display with Arduino. After we learn how to use the display we are going to build something useful. A simple real time clock. Let’s start.

20×4 I2C Character LCD display with Arduino Uno [Link]

Using I2C SSD1306 OLED Display With Arduino

Sometimes it may be necessary to use a display when making a hardware project, but one confusing thing is the size of the display and the required pins to control it. This tutorial will show you how to use a small I2C OLED display with Arduino using only two wires.

The display used in this tutorial has a very small (2.7 x 2.8cm) OLED screen, that is similar to Arduino Pro Mini size, with 128 x 64 screen resolution. The OLED Driver IC is SSD1306, a single-chip CMOS OLED/PLED driver with controller for organic / polymer light emitting diode dot-matrix graphic display system. The module has only 4 pins, two of them are the supply pins, while the others are SCL and SDA, I2C protocol pins, which will be used to control the display.

Using I2C SSD1306 OLED Display With Arduino – [Link]