Led category

RGBdigit clock

by Lucky @ elektormagazine.com build a LED display clock able to display temperature, humidity and air pressure. He writes:

What do you do when you want to design ‘something’ with a vintage or modern display? A clock of course, and this is our first design with RGBDigits: multi-colour 7-segment displays. With a BME280 breakout board attached it will also display temperature, humidity and air pressure. The clock is controlled by an ESP12 module, which makes it possible to synchronise the clock with an internet time server, change the clock settings from any mobile device or computer in the network, or transmit sensor data via Wi-Fi.

RGBdigit clock – [Link]

AS7221, An IoT Smart Lighting Manager

ams AG, a multinational semiconductor manufacturer and provider of high performance sensors and analog ICs, had announced the AS7221, an integrated white-tunable smart lighting manager that can be controlled through its network connection by means of simple text-based commands.

AS7221 Block Diagram

AS7221 is a networking-enabled IoT Smart Lighting Manager with embedded tri-stimulus color sensing for direct CIE color point mapping and control. IoT luminaire control is through a network connection, or by direct connection to 0-10V dimmers, with control outputs that include direct PWM to LED drivers and analog 0-10V to dimming ballasts. A simple text-based Smart Lighting Command Set and serial UART interface, enable easy integration to standard network clients.

Key features of AS7221:

  • Calibrated XYZ tri-stimulus color sensing for direct translation to CIE 1931/1976 standard observer color maps
  • Autonomous color point and lumen output adjustment resulting in automatic spectral and lumen maintenance
  • Simple UART interface for connection to network hardware clients for protocols such as Bluetooth, ZigBee and WiFi
  • Smart Lighting Command Set (SLCS) uses simple text-based commands to control and configure a wide variety of functions
  • Directly interfaces to 0-10V dimmer controls and standard occupancy sensors
  • Built-in PWM generator to dim LED lamps and luminaires
  • 12-bit resolution for precise dimming down to 1%
  • 0-10V analog output for control of conventional dimming ballasts in a current steering design
  • 20-pin LGA package 4.5mm x 4.7mm x 2.5mm with integrated aperture

“The next generation of lighting will be defined by three key characteristics: controllability, adaptation and connected architectures,” said Tom Griffiths, Senior Marketing Manager at ams. “Our new family of smart lighting managers meet those criteria. With this latest entry, we are addressing the luminaire manufacturers’ critical time-to-market challenge for developing and deploying a spectrally tunable luminaire that is cost-effective, accurate, and which smoothly integrates into the Internet of Things”.

The AS7221 is the first extension to ams’s recently announced Cognitive Lighting™ smart lighting manager family. The compact AS7221 will be available in a 5x5mm LGA package, for flexible integration into both luminaires and larger replacement lamps.

There are main domains of AS7221 applications, some of them are:

  • Smart home and smart building
  • Variable CCT general lighting industrial lighting
  • Retail and hospitality lighting with white-color tuning
  • LED tro ers, panel and downlights
  • LED replacement lamps (LED bulbs)
AS7221 Functional Diagram

Pricing for the AS7221 Spectral Tuning IoT Smart Lighting Manager is set at $3.13 in quantities of 10,000 pieces, and is available in production volumes now.

You can find AS7221 datasheet here.

NVSW319A, A New High Power LED By Nichia

Nichia Corporation, the Japanese chemical engineering and manufacturing company, announced the NVSW319A as a new high-power LED that achieves 164 lm/W at 700mA (5,000K).

The 319A is a 3.5×3.5×2.1 mm size LED which is footprint compatible with the old 3.5mm LEDs. The breakdown is specified at 1,050 mA (~3 W). Nichia planned to start the mass production of this LEDs in the end of December 2016 or in the early January 2017.

“The 319A is a production device, i.e. not one shining brightly deep down in a liquid nitrogen vessel or in the minds of a few theorists at MIT.” Nichia say.

A variant with 3000K color temperature is expected to yield 415 lm with a minimum CRI (color rendering index) of 80. This device won’t give you much deep red though as its R9 CRI specification is zero.

Source: elektor

PCB X-mas tree

Matthias created a X-Mas tree project using the DirtyPCB boards from dangerousprotorypes.com :

The project features an USB capable PIC16F1549 µC with:

  • USB FS device
  • 48 MHz internal Oscillator
  • 2 PWM modules
  • 10-bit ADC with Voltage Reference
  • Integrated Temperature Indicator Module

The LEDs are connected to the 2 PWM outputs via N-mos drivers. A Potentiometer is connected to one ADC channel for controlling the brightness of the LEDs or possibly the speed or variation of animations. Different modes of the X-mass tree can be switched by pressing a push button.

PCB X-mas tree – [Link]

A Christmas star with Neopixel LEDs

A geeky Christmas decoration made with 56 LED Neopixel and controlled via an Arduino Micro board:

Let’s take a look, therefore, at the project’s electrical section, that is essentially composed of a set of 56 Neopixel LEDs, that have been arranged so to form two concentric stars; the first 35 RGB LEDs (out of 56) form the bigger, external star, while the other 20 ones form the smaller and internal star. The LED number 56 is placed exactly at the center of the printed circuit board, that has the shape of a five-pointed star.
The Neopixel LEDs are connected in cascade but powered in parallel; such a configuration enables to address each single LED and to individually choose the colour; among the possible hues, the 256 possible combinations for each primary colour (therefore we have 256x256x256 combinations!) determine a total of 16,777,216 colours: that’s what one would call true colours!

A Christmas star with Neopixel LEDs – [Link]

How to use an RGB LED with Arduino

educ8s.tv uploaded a new video on their youtube channel.

Hey guys, I am Nick and welcome to educ8s.tv a channel that is all about DIY electronics projects with Arduino, Raspberry Pi, ESP8266 and other popular boards. In this video we are going to learn how to use an RGB led with Arduino, a very interesting type of LED. As you can see I have connected this LED to an Arduino Uno and every second it changes its color. That’s very handy because we can use only one LED in our projects and produce many colors!

How to use an RGB LED with Arduino – [Link]

DIY Pixel Art Frame Using Raspberry Pi Zero

Have you ever wanted to get an interesting art frame? That can display and flip photos, scroll text, show the weather or display social media notifications?

Frederick Vandenbosch’s new tutorial is for building an art frame using 32×32 LED matrix and Raspberry Pi Zero.

newimage-132

Electronics used in this project

You can watch a detailed step-by-step tutorial for assembling the frame in this video:


You can use the Adafruit RGB Matrix HAT like the tutorial to control the matrix and to make wiring simpler. But it is not mandatory, you can also wire the LED matrix directly to Pi’s GPIO. A USB Wifi adapter or dongle plugs into one of your desktop or laptop’s USB ports, allowing you to connect to a wireless network in the home, office, or a public place. You can use this connection to access shared files, devices, and documents, or to connect to the Internet. To connect this dongle with your Pi Zero you need a OTG USB cable. Connecting this dongle with your projects will open up for you doors of innovation, and that what made this frame cool!

The wiring is as described in this picture.

img_2833-1

Frederick used Raspbian Jessie “lite edition” for his Zero since the application is time-critical. Because it has more improvements, he preferred using Henner Zeller’s rpi-rgb-led-matrix library instead of the regular Adafruit library – which lately seemed an old version of the same series. He wrote a code to display and scroll ppm images, you can check it out here.

You can also use Raspberry Pi 3 in order to build this project, no need to change anything in software, and no need for the Wifi dongle since you can use the onboard Wifi. Things can be displayed on the matrix are unlimited. Since you have it connected with internet, this project could be your next IoT hack!

More details about this project and other amazing tutorials can be found at Frederick website.

Arduino-Based VU Meter

The voice unit (VU) meter is a device that displays a representation of the signal level in audio equipment. It is used in some consumer audio equipment for utilitarian purposes such as in recording devices or for aesthetics like playback devices.

The original VU meter is a passive electromechanical device, but using a few LEDs with a controller and some lines of code, you will be able to make an interesting digital VU meter device.

vu

These two instructables (1, 2) present an easy way to build a VU meter using an Arduino. In the first one the sound signals are received from an audio jack connected with a mobile phone or MP3 player, and the output is displayed on a 10-LED row. The second is an enhanced version of the meter, the signals will be collected via a microphone, and the LEDs row is replaced with a LED logo to visualize the VU meter output.

Components required for both versions are:

  • Breadboard
  • Microphone module
  • Arduino Uno
  • 3mm LEDs
  • 100ohm Resistor
  • Battery – 9V
  • Hookup wires and jumpers
  • RCA cable
  • Veroboard and soldering equipment are required if you want to make your own LED design.

 

vu2

First, design your LED logo by sorting the LEDs on the veroboard. You can use VeroDes to simplify this, it is an easy-to-use design program for those wishing to design circuits on veroboard. Make your design, print it, and then do some soldering.

Connect the LEDs with the digital pins from 2 to 13 with the 100 ohm resistors, and each resistor should be connected with a LED row. The digital pins will act as a positive voltage to the LEDs. Finally connect the microphone or the audio cable with the A0 pin as shown in the figure.

 

vu3Now upload this Arduino sketch, power on the circuit, play music and enjoy the show. You may need to adjust the gain in microphone module to get the perfect result.

You can see this project in action at this video:

 

And this:

 

 

Simple Electronic dice

150767-51

This project is an electronic dice. It consists of seven LEDs positioned like a dice which light up to show the number.

The leds are controlled by a 74HC4017 decade counter IC. Of this IC six outputs are used to drive the LEDs and a seventh output is used to reset the counter. This way it only counts up to six. To light up the correct LEDs, diodes are used. These block the current in one way so other outputs of the IC aren’t affected when LEDs are connected to multiple outputs.

Simple Electronic dice – [Link]

RELATED POSTS

World’s first broadband infrared LED by Osram

2016-11-03-eete-jh-osram_0

Designed for everyday food analytics, the SFH 4735 LED emits broadband infrared light in a wavelength range from 650 to 1,050 nanometers. by Julien Happich @ edn-europe.com

The component is well suited as a light source for near-infrared spectroscopy, for example to assess the quality of food thanks to mini spectrometers that could be developed as an add-on for smartphones.

World’s first broadband infrared LED by Osram – [Link]