Led category

How to build your own 8×8 led matrix

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circuitspecialists.com has published a new guide on how to build your own 8×8 LED Matrix on a prototyping board. In a later guide they will show how to program it using an Arduino Compatible board.

Today we will be starting our adventure into the deeply complex, yet totally incredible world of LED Matrices. This post will be the first of an entire Arduino Matrix Programming series by Circuit Specialists.

How to build your own 8×8 led matrix – [Link]

Starling – WiFi enabled LED Display

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Starling is a modular, Open Source LED display with WiFi connectivity. It comes with a mobile app for easy configuration and usage and has hardware support for Bluetooth.

The LED matrix is driven by an Atmega8 microcontroller (MCU), instead of a standard ASIC. This provides a lot of flexibility in the firmware. The firmware detects and assigns IDs to newly plugged-in modules. The microcontroller also stores font tables; hence if ASCII is sent on the serial (UART) port of the MCU, ASCII is what will be displayed on the matrix. Since the firmware detects adjacent displays, it can easily decide if it needs to display static or scrolling text.

Starling – WiFi enabled LED Display – [Link]

Replacement LED driver for AN6877

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Dilshan Jayakody has designed a board to replace AN6877 base LED drivers using discreet transistors. He writes:

AN6877 is linear AF level meter IC produced by Panasonic and it is commonly found on many audio equipment. This chip is no longer manufactured by Panasonic and finding replacement chip for AN6877 is also quiet difficult.
The circuit described in this article is design to replace AN6877 base LED drivers and it is based on commonly available components. This replacement LED driver is design using 10, MMBT3904/2N3904 transistors and it can easily modify to get necessary number of outputs.

Replacement LED driver for AN6877 – [Link]

Fake TV Security Light

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RonM9 @ instructables.com has build a fake led TV security light based on Arduino and NeoPixel WS2812 LED ring.

Fast & Easy Fake-TV Light module built for under $5; with enhanced features. With the use of this device you can go on vacation leaving your home with a lived in appearance and thus an added layer of security. “I’m up and I am a night owl … or perhaps asleep on the coach in front of the TV, ready to be awakened.”

Fake TV Security Light – [Link]

Warning LED Flash Light

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LED Flasher is a simple project producing a flashing effect of six LED’s.  This project can be used in all areas where you want to draw attention.  Hi-glow LED’s providing enough flashing light to attract your attention. Can be used as warning light.

Specifications

  • Supply input 12 V @ 35 mA (6 to 15V Dc Possible)
  • Onboard preset to adjust flash rate
  • Terminal pins for connecting supply input
  • Four mounting holes of 3.2 mm each
  • PCB dimensions 53 mm x 35 mm
  • CN1: Supply in 12V DC (6V-15V Supply Possible)
  • PR1 : Flash Frequency Adjust

Warning LED Flash Light – [Link]

Pixie – 3W chainable smart LED Pixel

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Ytai Ben-Tsvi @ ytai-mer.blogspot.com build a PIC based 3W LED Driver that is chainable. He writes:

LED Pixel: The Pixie is a color LED module, allowing an external controller to change its color and brightness dynamically.
Chainable: The module is designed so that you can chain many of them and control each one individually. If you know NeoPixels, this concept should be clear, but in case you don’t, imagine you want to build a project that requires 50 LEDs to be individually controlled. Naively, you would need to power each on of them individually, then connect each one of them individually to a controller. This would require tons of wiring, many pins on the controller, each one possibly driven by a specialized peripheral, such as UART or PWM. In short, this is not practical. With the Pixie, being chainable, you connect the first LED’s input pins to power and a single control pin (serial TX) on the controller. Then you connect the first LED’s output pins (power, ground, data) to the input of the second LED, and so on. Each Pixie in the chain consumes its own data, then relays the rest of the data down the chain, so the controller can control each Pixie individually, without being connected to each one.

Pixie – 3W chainable smart LED Pixel – [Link]

Open Badge: The LED Badge

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Rohit Gupta published a new build, the OpenBadge

The major elements on the PCB were:
– LED Matrix
– A MSP430G2553 microcontroller brain
– A ULN2803 Darlington Driver to sink the current
– A USB connector to charge the battery
– A SBW connector to program the MSP430
– A Switch to change the message
– A Li-Ion battery from a Discarded Phone
– Current limiting and Pull up resistors
– Decoupling Capacitors
– A REG1117 Regulator for MSP430

Open Badge: The LED Badge – [Link]

Wifi throwie : improved version

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iotests.blogspot.fr build a throwie based on ESP8266 WiFi module and a mini drone battery, he writes:

A few months ago, Andreas presented a nice version of the “throwie” (a LED packed with a small battery that you can throw & see shining for hours) using an ESP8266 instead of a LED : a “wifi throwie”.

He could not make it work with button cell batteries (the ESP8266 draws too much current) so he ended using a 3.7 LIPO battery, which is quite bulky as you can see on the following post : http://hackaday.com/2015/05/03/esp8266-wifi-throwies/

What if you could use instead a cheap mini drone battery you can find for half a euro on eBay ?
Bingo !

Wifi throwie : improved version – [Link]

LED Wave Display

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by 17bhuey @ instructables.com:

In order to create this project, many physical materials are necessary, a lot of which will not be found lying around at home. In order to do this project, you should go out to computer stores or look online for these products. Keep in mind that you can upgrade to larger LED boards or faster arduinos, but that would require some modification of this tutorial as the coding, wiring, etc, changes with the addition of different products. Overall, this project is a fun way for you to practice your engineering, circuitry, and computer science skills while making a device that shows off your music taste in a new light.

LED Wave Display – [Link]

Building the Colossus LED Display

by Adam Haile @ maniacallabs.com:

The 2014 NC Maker Faire was a huge turning point for Maniacal Labs. It was there that the idea for the AllPixel and what is now BiblioPixel got their start. It’s also where we showed off our first custom-built LED display, the 24×24 LPD8806 matrix. At nearly 24 inches square, and 1 pixel per inch, it was certainly impressive. But we left the Maker Faire with a desire to go bigger. Not just more pixels… but physically larger. Much larger. We call it “Colossus”.

Building the Colossus LED Display – [Link]