Led category

Warning LED Flash Light

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LED Flasher is a simple project producing a flashing effect of six LED’s.  This project can be used in all areas where you want to draw attention.  Hi-glow LED’s providing enough flashing light to attract your attention. Can be used as warning light.

Specifications

  • Supply input 12 V @ 35 mA (6 to 15V Dc Possible)
  • Onboard preset to adjust flash rate
  • Terminal pins for connecting supply input
  • Four mounting holes of 3.2 mm each
  • PCB dimensions 53 mm x 35 mm
  • CN1: Supply in 12V DC (6V-15V Supply Possible)
  • PR1 : Flash Frequency Adjust

Warning LED Flash Light – [Link]

Pixie – 3W chainable smart LED Pixel

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Ytai Ben-Tsvi @ ytai-mer.blogspot.com build a PIC based 3W LED Driver that is chainable. He writes:

LED Pixel: The Pixie is a color LED module, allowing an external controller to change its color and brightness dynamically.
Chainable: The module is designed so that you can chain many of them and control each one individually. If you know NeoPixels, this concept should be clear, but in case you don’t, imagine you want to build a project that requires 50 LEDs to be individually controlled. Naively, you would need to power each on of them individually, then connect each one of them individually to a controller. This would require tons of wiring, many pins on the controller, each one possibly driven by a specialized peripheral, such as UART or PWM. In short, this is not practical. With the Pixie, being chainable, you connect the first LED’s input pins to power and a single control pin (serial TX) on the controller. Then you connect the first LED’s output pins (power, ground, data) to the input of the second LED, and so on. Each Pixie in the chain consumes its own data, then relays the rest of the data down the chain, so the controller can control each Pixie individually, without being connected to each one.

Pixie – 3W chainable smart LED Pixel – [Link]

Open Badge: The LED Badge

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Rohit Gupta published a new build, the OpenBadge

The major elements on the PCB were:
– LED Matrix
– A MSP430G2553 microcontroller brain
– A ULN2803 Darlington Driver to sink the current
– A USB connector to charge the battery
– A SBW connector to program the MSP430
– A Switch to change the message
– A Li-Ion battery from a Discarded Phone
– Current limiting and Pull up resistors
– Decoupling Capacitors
– A REG1117 Regulator for MSP430

Open Badge: The LED Badge – [Link]

Wifi throwie : improved version

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iotests.blogspot.fr build a throwie based on ESP8266 WiFi module and a mini drone battery, he writes:

A few months ago, Andreas presented a nice version of the “throwie” (a LED packed with a small battery that you can throw & see shining for hours) using an ESP8266 instead of a LED : a “wifi throwie”.

He could not make it work with button cell batteries (the ESP8266 draws too much current) so he ended using a 3.7 LIPO battery, which is quite bulky as you can see on the following post : http://hackaday.com/2015/05/03/esp8266-wifi-throwies/

What if you could use instead a cheap mini drone battery you can find for half a euro on eBay ?
Bingo !

Wifi throwie : improved version – [Link]

LED Wave Display

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by 17bhuey @ instructables.com:

In order to create this project, many physical materials are necessary, a lot of which will not be found lying around at home. In order to do this project, you should go out to computer stores or look online for these products. Keep in mind that you can upgrade to larger LED boards or faster arduinos, but that would require some modification of this tutorial as the coding, wiring, etc, changes with the addition of different products. Overall, this project is a fun way for you to practice your engineering, circuitry, and computer science skills while making a device that shows off your music taste in a new light.

LED Wave Display – [Link]

Building the Colossus LED Display

by Adam Haile @ maniacallabs.com:

The 2014 NC Maker Faire was a huge turning point for Maniacal Labs. It was there that the idea for the AllPixel and what is now BiblioPixel got their start. It’s also where we showed off our first custom-built LED display, the 24×24 LPD8806 matrix. At nearly 24 inches square, and 1 pixel per inch, it was certainly impressive. But we left the Maker Faire with a desire to go bigger. Not just more pixels… but physically larger. Much larger. We call it “Colossus”.

Building the Colossus LED Display – [Link]

Driving LEDs

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Emanuele @ dev.emcelettronica.com published an article on how to drive LEDs:

The LEDs (Light Emitting Diode) are diodes whose basic characteristic is the ability to emit light when they are passed through a current that flows from P to N region. At each recombination between the charge carriers (electrons and holes), on PN junction region, a photo emission is generated, and the total quantity of emitted photons, and therefore the light intensity, is proportional to the current intensity that passes through them. The emitted light has a spectrum – wavelengths distribution – that is defined according to the materials used in the realization of the diode PN junction, although it partially depends on the current intensity and on the junction temperature.

Driving LEDs – [Link]

A Connected Lamp to Wake Me Up

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Limpkin has modified his IKEA lamp to use 10W LEDs.

So for some reason I bought 2 IKEA lamps at a flea market. As IKEA furniture has a long history of being hacker-friendly, I figured they shouldn’t be an exception to the rule.
My plan? Fit a few 10W RGB LEDs in there together with an ESP8266 to use the final result as an alarm clock.

When you are dealing with a LED consuming that much current, you can’t simply use a series resistor as the latter would need to dissipate R*I² in heat. I’m therefore using a dedicated LED driver that automatically adjusts the LED voltage to match a given current. As you can guess, it isn’t much different than a standard step-down and just uses a shunt resistor to measure the current flowing through the LED.

A Connected Lamp to Wake Me Up – [Link]

Fake TV Security Light

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by Marcus Jenkins:

This gadget steps up the game from leaving a light on at home when you’re out. Place it near a window to make it look like somebody’s at home watching TV.

The idea of leaving a light on at home while you’re out is to give the burglar an uneasy feeling that somebody’s at home and it might be worth trying the next house along instead. A TV on at night plays a constantly-changing light-show against your window which really does say I’m at home and I’m awake. Of course, you could leave a real TV on but that’s an eco-disaster since TV’s consume 50W at best and hundreds at worst. Plus you might not want to be burning your TV in for days on end if you’re not at home.

Fake TV Security Light – [Link]

Voltage indicator transitions between colours

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by Einar Abell @ edn.com:

This Design Idea gives two versions of an indicator light that changes from green to red as a battery discharges. There are many circuits that do this sort of thing, but all the ones I have seen are too complex and costly for my taste. This DI shows a method that uses an absolute minimum of low cost parts: a dual-color LED and four other parts.

Voltage indicator transitions between colours – [Link]