Motor category

Control Nema Stepper Motor With Arduino

@ instructables.com have an article describing stepper motors and how to drive them using Arduino. They write:

Lots of People want to build Them own small Cnc machine . they started with drives stepper motor but they stacked in controller Programming . In this instructable Robokits will provide a resource to control your Stepper motor with Arduino. Before Programming we have to learn some basics Related to Stepper motor .

Control Nema Stepper Motor With Arduino – [Link]

Wembi – Closed Loop Motorupgrade for 3D Printer

TeamVenture-Bit tipped us with their kickstarter campaign. It’s about a closed loop motor upgrade kit that will enable your 3D printer to print faster, silently and more consistently. Check it out.

Boasting an advanced PID compensation system that detects issues while your 3D printer or other CNC based machine is moving,

Wembi readjusts itself to eliminate printing problems and help you get the perfect prints fast!

Wembi – Closed Loop Motorupgrade for 3D Printer – [Link]

STEP/DIR SIGNAL TO CW/CWW SIGNAL CONVERTER FOR CNC & MOTION CONTROL SYSTEMS

Simple Circuit converts Step/Dir. signal into to double drive CW/CWW Pulse, Mach3 and few Hobby CNC software’s provides Step/Direction pulse output to drive stepper motor drivers.

Various AC servo works with double CW/CCW pulse. This circuit is solution to interface such AC CW/CCW pulse based driver with Mach3 or other CNC software’s. Circuit designed around 7408 and 7404 IC, board support 5V or 24V supply. Open Collector output can be interface with 24V system by changing output resistors.

Features

  • Supply 7V 24V DC
  • On Board Power LED
  • Inputs and Outputs Header Connector
  • On Board ERTH (Earth) Signal provided for chassis ground to avoid any noise

STEP/DIR SIGNAL TO CW/CWW SIGNAL CONVERTER FOR CNC & MOTION CONTROL SYSTEMS – [Link]

4.5A H-Bridge DC Motor Driver Module Using TB6549HQ

The H-Bridge Motor Driver Module Based on TB6549HQ IC from Toshiba, is a full-bridge driver IC for DC motors that uses an LDMOS structure for output transistors. High-efficiency drive is possible through the use of a MOS process with low ON-resistance and a PWM drive system. Four modes, CW, CCW, short brake, and stop, can be selected using IN1 and IN2. Supply input 12V to 30V DC and Maximum Load 4.5Amps.

Specifications

  • Power supply voltage: 30 V (max)
  • Output current 4.5 A
  • Low ON-resistance: 1.0 Ω (up + low/typ.)
  • PWM control capability
  • Standby system
  • Function modes: CW/CCW/short brake/stop
  • Built-in overcurrent protection
  • Built-in thermal shutdown circuit

4.5A H-Bridge DC Motor Driver Module Using TB6549HQ – [Link]

2X L298 Dual DC Motor Driver Board for Robots

2x L298 H-Bridge Dual Motor driver project can control two DC motors connected to it.  The circuit is designed around popular dual H-Bridge L298 from ST. Motor supply 7V To 46V DC, Load 2Amp Each Channel.

Features

  • Motor supply V2: 7 to 46 VDC
  • Logic Supply V1 : 5V DC
  • Input Signal: Enable, Dir. , PWM
  • Board Provides Current Feed Back ( On Board Shunt Resistor)
  • Control Logic Input: Standard TTL logic level
  • Output DC drive to motor: up to 2A + 2A
  • External Diode Bridge for protection
  • On Board 5V Power LED
  • On Board Motor Supply LED
  • 10X Box Header Connector for Inputs and PWM
  • Header Connector For Logic Supply
  • Screw Terminal for Motor Connections
  • Screw Terminal For Motor Supply

2X L298 Dual DC Motor Driver Board for Robots – [Link]

DC Motor & Direction Controller with Brake using MC33035

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This is a 3AMP DC Motor speed and direction controller using MC33035 IC from on semiconductor, though the MC33035 was designed to control brushless DC motor , it may also be used to control DC brush type motors. MC33035 driving a Mosfets based H-Bridge affording minimal parts count to operate a brush type motor. On board potentiometer provided for speed control, slide switch for direction control and brake, On board jumper available to enable the chip. The controller function in normal manner with a PWM frequency of approximately 25Khz. Motor speed is controlled by adjusting the voltage presented to the non inverting input of the error amplifier establishing the PWM’s slice or reference level. Cycle by cycle current limiting of the motor is accomplished by sensing the voltage across the shunt resistor to the ground of H-bridge. The overcurrent sense circuit makes it possible to reverse the direction of the motor, using normal forward/reverse switch, on the fly and not have to completely stop it before reversing.

DC Motor & Direction Controller with Brake using MC33035 – [Link]

2.5A Bipolar Stepper Motor Driver using A3979

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The tiny board designed using A3979 IC from ALLEGRO which is complete micro stepping driver with built in translator. The translator is the key to the easy implementation of the A3979. It allows the simple input of one pulse on the STEP pin to drive the motor one micro step, which can be either a full step, half, quarter, or sixteenth, depending on the setting of the MS1 and MS2 logic inputs. There are no phase-sequence tables, high-frequency control lines, or complex interfaces to program. The A3979 interface is an ideal fit for applications where a complex microprocessor is unavailable or is overburdened.

Features

  • CN1 Motor Supply Input Up to 30V DC (35V Maximum)
  • Load 2.5A
  • Logic Supply 3.3V to 5V DC
  • CN3 Bipolar Stepper Motor Connections
  • CN2 Logic Supply 5V & Signal Inputs
  • J1-MS2 & J2-MS1 Micro-Stepping FULL, HALF, Quarter, Sixteenth
  • J3, J4 Option Replacement for PR1 Jumper Type Current Setting
  • D1 Logic Power LED
  • REF (PR1) Current Adjust 0-2V

2.5A Bipolar Stepper Motor Driver using A3979 – [Link]

Program a mBot With Scratch And Arduino

Makeblock was founded in 2012 in Shenzhen as the world’s first open-source robot and programing platform. With more than 400 mechanical components, electronic modules, and software tools, the company is determined to bring meaningful STEM education opportunities and the maker mindset to the mass consumer market to make a real difference in society’s future with robotics.

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Makerblock has a variety of products and one great product is mBot, a robot better fit education and home use. It is simple to use and affordable, you can get mBot for $24 or with bluetooth for $99.

The mBot is designed especially for mBlock Scratch-based language to help teachers and kids to have hands-on experience about robots and explore STEM education.

 

World’s very first Scratch 2.0 branch that can upload a program into Arduino based boards
World’s very first Scratch 2.0 branch that can upload a program into Arduino based boards
mBot overview

Makeblock keeps delivering tutorials about its products and the recent one was a line follower mBot on Insructables.

To do this project you need the following tools

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Mechanical part list
  • 1*Metal Base Plate
  • 2*TT Gear Motor
  • 2*Wheel
  • 2*Tyre
  • 1*Plastic Universal Wheel
  • 1*Magic Tape 20*30mm
  • 6*Brass Stud M4*25
  • 14*Socket Cap Screw M4*8
  • 6*Nut M4
  • 4*Nut M3
  • 4*Philip’s Head Screw M3*25
  • 2*Tapping Screw M2.2*9.5

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Electronic Modules List

You only have to put each element in the right place and to tighten some screws. The image below shows how to assemble the pieces together.

mbot

The mBlock is a customized version of scratch. It is easy to use mBlock to interact with electronic modules. To make the project works, you should first program the Control Board (Compatible with Arduino) using this code of mBlock.

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You can also program it using Arduino IDE since it makes it easy to write code, upload it to the I/O board, and interact with mBot. Line following is one simple code for controlling the mBot by Infrared Controller.

#include "mBot.h"
#include "MePort.h"
#include "MeIR.h"
#include "MeDCMotor.h"

MeBoard myBoard(mBot);
double angle_rad = PI/180.0;
double angle_deg = 180.0/PI;
MeIR ir;
MeDCMotor motor_9((MEPORT)9);
MeDCMotor motor_10((MEPORT)10);

void setup() {
 ir.begin();
}

void loop() {
 if(ir.keyPressed(64)){
  motor_9.run(255);
  motor_10.run(255);
 } else {
  if(ir.keyPressed(25)){
   motor_9.run(-255);
   motor_10.run(-255);
  } else {
   if(ir.keyPressed(7)){
    motor_9.run(255);
    motor_10.run(-255);
   } else {
    if(ir.keyPressed(25)){
     motor_9.run(-255);
     motor_10.run(255);
    } else {
     motor_9.run(0);
     motor_10.run(0);
    }
   }
  }
 }
 ir.loop();
}

You can learn more about using Arduino for mBot here.

This is what should mBot do!

You can build your own adventure, play some games or make some functions completed autonomously using mBot, such as playing football, ultrasonic obstacle-avoiding and following line. Makeblock is opening wide doors for innovation by making STEM and hands-on experience available for kids.

A new product from MakerBlock is now live on Kickstarter. AirBlock, the first modular drone that can be turned into a hovercraft, car, and more. You can order this drone from the project’s page for $99.

More details and updates can be reached at the official website. Also you can access codes and source files at Github.

WiFi enabled Motors

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WiFi controllable motors for your many projects. An Open Source platform that anyone can use.

Using our motors is as simple as joining your motors network (or adding the device to an existing network) and controlling it with any of our apps, its built it webpage, or just raw JSON packets. Our motors are made to be both a solution for someone not skilled enough to set up stepper and servo motors, and for experts who want a less messy way to implement motors. Our hardware and software are both on github, and our board was made specifically to be compatible with the free version of EagleCad.

WiFi enabled Motors – [Link]

Sonicare toothbrush teardown: microcontroller, H bridge, and inductive charging

sonicare-internals-composite

Ken Shirriff did a teardown of a Sonicare electric toothbrush:

The photos below show the top and bottom of the toothbrush internals. I expected to find a simple, low-cost mechanism, so I was surprised at how much complexity there was inside. The vibration mechanism (right) is built from multiple metal and plastic parts screwed together, requiring more expensive assembly than I expected. The circuit board is literally gold-plated and has a lot of components, even if it doesn’t quite reach Apple’s level of complexity. Overall, the toothbrush’s internal design is high quality (except, of course, for the fact that it quit working, as did an earlier one).

Sonicare toothbrush teardown: microcontroller, H bridge, and inductive charging – [Link]