Power supply category

5V to 12V @400mA Boost Converter

The circuit presented here is about a boost converter based on LM2698. It is a PWM boost converter from Texas instruments. LM2698 can also be used as a flyback converter. The current mode architecture is a special feature of LM2698, which provides superior line and load regulation. This circuit is capable of a supplying a output voltage of 12V for a input range of 4.5V to 5.5V.

Specifications

  • Input voltage: 4.5VDC to 5.5VDC
  • Output voltage: 12VDC
  • Output current: 0.4A
  • PCB:45mm X 30mm

5V to 12V @400mA Boost Converter – [Link]

5V Regulator Cap for 9V battery

David Cook built a 5V regulator to sit atop a 9V battery:

For quick portable projects and temporary hacks, it is often faster to reuse a simple 5V regulator circuit than to integrate a power supply into the device design. My toolbox has an LED tester and magnifier light, so why not add a convenient 5V regulator cap to the collection? There are nicer ones on the market that have surface mount components, but half the fun of an electronics hobby is creating something basic in your own style. This double-decker board with flashing LED power indicator allowed me to experiment with flush battery snaps and board interconnects.

5V Regulator Cap for 9V battery – [Link]

5V @3A Switching Power Supply

This circuit is about a buck regulator which can produce an output of 5V for a input voltage ranging from 7V to 40V. LM2576 is a monolithic IC and it acts as the heart of this circuit. This IC has a potential of delivering an output current up to 3A and requires less number of external components. It is highly efficient when compared to other three terminal linear regulators and small in size.

Features

  • Input(V): 7VDC to 40VDC
  • Output(V): 5VDC
  • Output load: 3A
  • PCB:36mm X 35mm

5V @3A Switching Power Supply – [Link]

snapVCC – A snap-on regulated 3.3 V/5 V power supply

by Mahesh Venkitachalam @ hackaday.io:

I use 9 V batteries for a prototyping a lot of my electronics projects. I was inspired by the Sparkfun breadboard power supply board, and wanted to create something similar, but with a more convenient form factor for use with a 9V battery. The design I came up with, is a tiny snap-on PCB with the regulator components on one side, and 9V battery contacts on the other. The idea is that the power supply will become part of the battery.

snapVCC – A snap-on regulated 3.3 V/5 V power supply – [Link]

1.2V-32V @3A Variable Switching Regulator using LM317

The circuit presented here is based on LM317. Generally, LM317 is known as a linear regulator IC, but here the circuit operates as a switching regulator. This circuit operates by transferring energy
from the input to the output by using a solid state switch. Power Efficiency of a switching regulator is much higher than the linear regulators. The input voltage for this circuit is 8V-35V and it can produce the output of 1.8V to 32V, that can be varied by using potentiometer R3.

Features

  • Input(V): 8VDC to 35VDC
  • Output(V): 1.8VDC to 32VDC
  • Output load: 3A
  • PCB:68mm X 50mm

1.2V-32V @3A Variable Switching Regulator using LM317 – [Link]

5V to 12V @1.2A regulated power supply using LM2587

This circuit is based on LM2587, a simple boost converter from Texas instruments. It produces a 12V regulated output for a input of 5V. It can also be used as a multiple output regulator, forward converter and as a flyback regulator. This regulator requires minimum number of external components, which makes it cost effective.

Features

  • Input(V): 4.5VDC to 5.5VDC
  • Output(V): 12V DC
  • Output load: 1.2A
  • PCB:38mm X 30mm

5V to 12V @1.2A regulated power supply using LM2587 – [Link]

12V @ 120mA Transformerless Power Supply

The circuit provided here is a transformer-less non-isolated power supply which is capable of delivering an output of 12V at 120mA current for an input voltage varying from 85VAC-265VAC. The LNK304 is the heart of this circuit which supports buck boost and flyback topologies. This project is low in cost and simple when compared other tramsformer-less power supplies.

Features:

  • Input(V): 85V AC to 265V AC
  • Output(V): 12V DC
  • Output load: 120mA
  • PCB:75mm X 35mm

12V @ 120mA Transformerless Power Supply – [Link]

Teardown of a Peaktech 6225A

Teardown and analysis of a Peaktech 6225A power supply from ElectroBob:

I got a Peaktech 6225A power supply to power some things, as it seemed like a good deal, going beyond what one might find normally in these types of supplies: more display resolution and supposedly, lower noise. For this price, this supply is a good deal compared to other similar ones on the market. Let’s see how it performs.

Teardown of a Peaktech 6225A – [Link]

EEZ H24005, Two-Channel Programmable Power Supply

Envox Experimental Zone (EEZ) is an open hardware and open source development website, that creates and shares various open source hardware and software projects using as much as possible open-source tools and technologies.

One of their projects is the programmable bench power supply ‘EEZ H24005’. The goal is to make a reliable, modular, open and programmable power supply, that can be used for various tasks starting with powering breadboard, charge batteries of various types, or to be used as an educational tool and science experiments.

The EEZ H24005 is a DIY power supply unit consists of four PCBs and SMT electronics components except some power resistor, AC/DC adapter, and power regulators. Only two ICs need hot air soldering station to mount, while the remaining parts can be simply mounted with soldering iron.

Top Faces Of The Four PCBs
Bottom Faces Of The Four PCBs

To build this PSU you will need these tools:

In addition to modularity, programmability, openness, and DIY, reliability was one of the key features and design guidelines of the designing process. Because as a sourcing device, the PSU has to be designed in the way that no dangerous oscillation in voltage or current is present over the long period of deployment. That includes border case of turning the PSU on and off, applying or disconnecting load, etc.

Here is some of the main features of H24005:

  • Modular design that allows combining modules with various performance and capability and creation of multiple output solution
  • Voltage regulation (CV), 10 mV resolution
  • Current regulation (CC), 10 mA initial resolution
  • Various current single range operation (0-5 A default, 0-3 A or 0-4 A per channel)
  • 15-bit data acquisition resolution
  • Real-time clock (RTC) with supercap/battery backup
  • SD-card as an additional storage
  • Ethernet support for remote control
  • Simple DC output protection (reverse voltage, over-voltage)
H24005 PSU Block Diagram

Since it is an open source project, all files, designs, source codes are available at the Github repository. Also a detailed building guide is available at the official website. But if you want to get H24005 but not interested in making it, you can order yours through OSHPark. There is also a CrowdSupply campagin on going.

Power Topologies Quick Reference Guide from TI

17 of the most common hard switched power supply topologies and the Phase Shifted Full Bridge with the most important waveforms and equations are now available for you in an easy download-and-print option.

Power Topologies Quick Reference Guide from TI – [Link]