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290Hz Narrowband Laser On Chip For Numeros Photonic Applications

Researchers from the MESA+ research institute at University of Twente have collaborated together with the provider company of the customized microsystem solutions “LioniX International” to achieve the lowest bandwidth tunable diode laser on a chip.

The newly-developed laser operates in the IR region at 1550 nm with an 81 nm tuning range, which means that users can choose the color of the laser themselves, within a broad range. The laser is an integrated InP-Si3N4 hybrid laser consists of two different photonic chips, optically connected to each other.

Photonics is a key technology that makes numerous other innovations possible. So that, scientists and researchers are making big efforts at this field including deployment of photons for transporting and processing data.

To make photonic chips function as efficient as possible, we need to be able to control the light signals. Which means that all transmitted light particles should have the same frequency and wavelength as possible. The university researchers have succeeded developing a tiny laser on a chip with a maximum bandwidth of just 290 Hertz.

Our signal is more than ten times more coherent – or clean – than any other laser on a chip.
~ Professor Klaus Boller, the research leader

This record laser will have countless applications especially in fiber optic communications that require high data rate. This applications includes 5G mobile networks, accurate GPS systems and sensors for monitoring the structural integrity of buildings and bridges.

You can find out more details here.

Edgefx Kits, Get Your DIY Project Kit Now!

Aiming to bridge the gap between the academics and industry in electronics, communication and electrical sectors, Edgefx Technologies was born at 2012 as an online store for project solutions.

Edgefx provides practical skill building solutions to the engineering students in the form of Do It Yourself (DIY) project kits. These kits support wide areas of electronics and communication, and also the latest trends like IoT, Android, Arduino, Raspberry Pi and many more.

Edgefx kits are easy to use and self-explanatory. They come with hardware and training material in the form of extensive audio-visuals and can be purchased online.

The company has grown to have a very strong focus on customer service, quality and morale of the staff and most of all, a passion for what we do. And although we’re a team of almost 30 right now, nothing about us is corporate. We don’t have multiple tiers of hierarchy. The vast majority of our employees work on the front lines, taking care of our customers or shipping items out of the Edgefx Fulfillment Centers.

The website contains more than 200 projects in about 15 different categories. Kits prices range from Rs. 1500 to Rs. 50000 (~ $23 to $750). In addition to the project kits, Edgefx also conducts practical workshops in colleges and schools.

School students, starting from 8 years old, can opt for school electronic projects that empowering them to innovate. It includes three basic level STEM kits and one intermediate level kit. All of these kits are edutainment and fun, with real time applications using latest technologies, and also can create multiple experiments.

Each basic kit has a three project inside, these projects are:

  • Security protection for museum items
  • Touch controlled fan
  • Touch me not LED warning
  • Bike theft alarm
  • Upside down  indicator for fragile item
  • Toll gate auto light LED
  • Security area protecting alarm
  • Auto door opening motor
  • Human detection under debries

The intermediate kit is an Arduino project kit. This project is designed for digital sensors solder-less Arduino projects on breadboard. It will light flasher of different color light on single LED each time on sensing finger swipe with the help of IR obstacle sensor. Also, the project makes different unique sounds on sensing each time.

Beginners Arduino Project Kit

So, if you are searching for some project kits you have to visit the Edgefx store, explore the kits to find the project you want to make and then order it. In the end, don’t forget to share with us your experience once you buy and use the kit!

96-Layer Memory Chips By Toshiba

The need for larger memory storage for smartphones will never stop, especially with the continuous development of larger and stronger applications. This need is always pushing semiconductor manufacturers to keep trying to fit as much bits as possible in  smaller volumes and with lower costs.

To achieve this, memory chips are now growing in three dimensions instead of two. Recently, Toshiba has developed a new 96-layer BiCS 3D flash memory device with a storage capacity of 32 GB. The new device meets market demands and performance specifications for applications that include enterprise and consumer SSD, smartphones, tablets and memory cards.

This memory chip was built with three bits per cell, known as triple-level cell (TLC) technology. Stacking layers and manufacturing process increase the capacity of each chip with 40% per unit size. They also reduce the cost per bit, and increase the manufacturability of memory capacity per silicon wafer.

In order to add more layers to the chip, Toshiba is working on increasing the number of bits in every cell. In the near future, it will apply its new 96-layer process technology to larger capacity products, such as 64 GB. It will also develop chips with QLC (quadruple-level cell) technology.

By stacking 64 layers of QLCs, the engineers at Toshiba have created a 96-gigabyte device. Integrating 16 of them in one package will achieve a capacity of 1.5 TB, that corresponds to 12 trillion bits.

If you are interested, you can check these out at the 2017 Flash Memory Summit in Santa Clara, California from August 7-10.

Source: elektor

RandA, Combining Raspberry Pi & Arduino

Two years ago, open electronics had produced “RandA“, an Atmega328-based board for Raspberry Pi to deliver the advantages of both, Raspberry Pi and Arduino. Earlier this month, an updated version of RandA has been released to be compatible with Raspberry Pi 3.

RandA is a development board that leverages the hardware equipment and the computing power of Arduino with its shields, and the enormous potential of the Raspberry Pi. It features Atmega328 microcontroller, has RTC (Real Time Clock) module, power button and sleep timer, connectors for 5 volts and connectors for mounting Arduino shield.

Combining these two platforms is a way to exploit specific characteristics of both. Raspberry Pi could use Arduino as configurable device, and Arduino might work as a controller for Raspberry Pi allowing access to complex environments like the network, allowing complex processing or access to multimedia.

RandA was created at first for Raspberry Pi 2 and B+, using the first 20 pins to connect them, the serial port for programming the Atmega328 and for communication with Raspberry Pi. With the enhancements that come with the third version of Raspberry Pi, such as upgrading CPU to a quad-core 64 bit ARMv8 clocked at 1.2 GHz and adding WiFi and Bluetooth transceivers, there were some structure modifications that require updating the RandA.

Raspberry Pi 3 uses the standard UART0 serial port for connection via the Bluetooth interface equipping version 3. Therefore, it is no longer available on GPIO14/15 as it was in the first and second version of Raspberry Pi. The secondary UART1 serial is configured on those pins instead, but this serial port is based on a simulated serial not on a preset UART hardware. In particular, its clock is connected to the frequency of the clock of the system which varies in function of the load in order to save energy.

To solve this, the software is configured to recover the UART0 on GPIO 14/15 pins without modifying any hardware parts. This way will disable the Bluetooth peripheral, but the WiFi is still working and you can use Bluetooth by connecting a Bluetooth dongle via USB.

To know more about the new version of RandA you can review this post, and reading this post to learn more about RandA in general. You can get your RandA board for about $36 and this tutorial will help you get starting with it.

Cinque, Combining RISC-V With Arduino

After announcing “HiFive1” at the end of 2016, SiFive is introducing its second RISC-V based development board “The Arduino Cinque“. It is the first Arduino board that is featuring RISC-V instruction set architecture.

Arduino Cinque is running SiFive’s Freedom E310, one of the fastest and powerful microcontrollers in the hardware market. It also includes built-in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth capabilities by using the efficient, low-power Espressif ESP32 chip. During the Maker Faire Bay Area on May 20th, only some prototypes of Arduino Cinque were available for demonstration.

The FE310 SoC features the E31 CPU Coreplex (32-bit RV32IMAC Core) with 16KB L1 instruction cache and 16KB data SRAM scratchpad. It runs at 320 MHz operating speed and it also has a debugging module, one-time programmable non-volatile memory (OTP), and on-chip oscillators and PLLS. FE310 also supports UART, QSPI, PWM, and timer peripherals and low-power standby mode.

The availability of the Arduino Cinque provides the many dreamers, tinkerers, professional makers and aspiring entrepreneurs access to state-of-the-art silicon on one of the world’s most popular development architectures. Using an open-source chip built on top of RISC-V is the natural evolution of open-source hardware, and the Arduino Cinque has the ability to put powerful SiFive silicon into the hands of makers around the world.
~ Dale Dougherty, founder and executive chairman of Maker Media

Details and other specifications of the Cinque are still poor, but we can expect its strength from the chips and SoCs it uses. It uses STM32F103, that has Cortex-M3 core with a maximum CPU speed of 72 MHz, to provide the board with USB to UART translation. ESP32 is also used as for Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity.

Espressif ESP32 Specifications

  • 240 MHz dual core Tensilica LX6 micrcontroller
  • 520KB SRAM
  • 802.11 BGN HT40 Wi-Fi transceiver, baseband, stack, and LWIP
  • Classic and BLE integrated dual mode Bluetooth
  • 16 MB flash memory
  • On-board PCB antenna
  • IPEX connector for use with external antenna
  • Ultra-low noise analog amplifier
  • Hall sensor
  • 32 KHz crystal oscillator
  • GPIOs for UART, SPI, I2S, I2C, DAC, and PWM
A first look at the RISC-V-based Arduino Cinque, a SiFive R&D project.
A first look at the RISC-V-based Arduino Cinque, a SiFive R&D project.

The RISC-V Foundation is working to spread the idea and the benefits of the open-source ISA. Its efforts include hosting workshops, participating in conferences, and collaborating with academia and industry. The foundation had also worked with researchers from Princeton University to identify flaws with the ISA design. They presented their findings at the 22nd ACM International Conference on Architectural Support for Programming Languages and Operating Systems.

Sonnet Off-Grid Device, The Smartphone Walkie-Talkie

At Sonnet Labs, a group of avid outdoor enthusiasts aim to democratize mobile communication with technologies that enable smartphones to send text messages, image data, and GPS locations without Internet connectivity, cellular coverage, or satellite reception.

No need for cellular grid with Sonnet

Therefore, they launched their product, Sonnet, the smartphone walkie-talkie! Sonnet is a wireless device that brings the long-range wireless communication capability of the 2-way radio (walkie-talkie) to smartphones. In addition, it enables device-to-device data transfer through low-power, long-range radio frequencies dependently on cellular grids and infrastructures.

Accordingly, Sonnet can connect wirelessly to any smartphone. Also, it allows sending data up to many miles in distance to other smartphones that already are using Sonnet.

More features to come…

Sonnet uses mesh networking in order to reach users out-of-point relaying on sending data privately through other users in area. This data travelling through Sonnet is already end-to-end encrypted with AES. At the same time, the Sonnet Wi-Fi connection is protected with WPA/WPA2.

It also has the ability to charge your phone. Thanks to the 4000mAh battery capacity, Sonnet can charge your smartphone through its USB port.

Moreover, you don’t need to install software in your smartphone. It is enough to have an access to the app through your browser. The team tailored this feature to allow users who don’t have internet access to use the device easily.

Above all, one of the amazing features included is SOS mode. In case of emergencies. you can press the panic button. Next, Sonnet will send your GPS location and your message to all users in range.

Full specifications of Sonnet below:

In conclusion, Sonnet is the wireless device that enables you send instant messages, voice recordings, image data and GPS coordinates even if you don’t have cellular coverage or Internet access.

Sonnet is now live on a Kickstarter campaign and has already achieved 290% of its required funds. The campaign still has 28 days to go, where you can pre-order two pair of Sonnet for $89! Also check the official website for more details.

Bluey, BLE Development Board Supports NFC

Development boards are assistant tools that help engineers and enthusiasts to become familiarized with hardware development. They simplify the process of controlling and programming hardware, such as microcontrollers and microprocessors.

Electronut Labs, an embedded systems consulting company, had produced its new BLE development board “Bluey” with a set of useful sensors and NFC support.

Bluey is an open source board that features the Nordic nRF52832 SoC which supports BLE and other proprietary wireless protocols. Bluey has built-in sensors that include temperature, humidity, ambient light and accelerometer sensors. Also, it supports NFC and comes with a built-in NFC PCB antenna.

The nRF52832 SoC is a powerful, ultra-low power multiprotocol SoC suited for Bluetooth Low Energy, ANT and 2.4GHz ultra low-power wireless applications. It is built around a 32-bit ARM Cortex™-M4F CPU with 512kB + 64kB RAM.

Bluey Specifications:

  • Nordic nRF52832 QFAA BLE SoC (512k Flash / 64k RAM)
  • TI HDC1010 Temperature/Humidity sensor
  • APDS-9300-020 ambient light sensor
  • ST Micro LSM6DS3 accelerometer
  • CREE RGB LED
  • CP2104 USB interface
  • 2 push buttons
  • Coin cell holder
  • Micro SD slot
  • 2.4 GHz PCB antenna
  • NFC PCB antenna

Bluey can be programmed using the Nordic nRF5 SDK. You can upload the code with an external programmer such as the Nordic nRF52-DK, or the Black Magic Probe firmware on STM32F103 breakout. But, within the built-in OTA (over the air) bootloader, you can upload the code directly using a PC or a phone.

The sensors on the board require a minimum of 2.7 volts to function properly, and the maximum power is 6 volts. Bluey’s design offers three different ways to power it, all of them have a polarity protection:

  1. Using the 5V micro USB connector (which also gives you the option to print debug messages via UART).
  2. The + / – power supply pins which can take regular 2.54 mm header pins, a JST connector for a 3.7 V LiPo battery, or a 3.5 mm terminal block.
  3. A CR2032 coin cell for low power applications.

You can use Bluey for a wide range of projects. The BLE part is ideal for IoT projects, or if you want to control something with your phone. The nRF52832 SoC has a powerful ARM Cortex-M4F CPU, so you can use this board for general purpose microcontroller projects as well.

Bluey is available for $29 for international customers from Tindie store. Indian customers can purchase it from Instamojo store. There are also discounts for bulk purchases. For more information about the board visit its github repository, where you will find a full guide to start and a bunch of demo projects.

Banana Pi BPI-M2 Berry, A Quad Core Single-Board Computer

Raspberry Pi is a powerful on-board computer series launched few years ago. Many similar boards appeared providing cheaper price or more features. The Chinese company “SinoVoIP” is manufacturing its own board “Banana Pi“, and recently they unveiled a new board that is similar to Raspberry Pi 3 and called “BPI-M2 Berry“.

The BPi Berry features the Allwinner R40 32-bit quad-core ARM Cortex-A7 CPU giving it the same power of Raspberry Pi 2 version 1.0. It is similar to the BPi M2 Ultra that was released a few months back, but with 1 GB DDR3 SRAM instead of 2 GB and without eMMC Flash Memory. BPi Berry has a different size of other BPi boards, making it the first RPi size-compatible BPi with the same size and connector placement as the RPi3.

Banana Pi BPI-M2 Berry specifications:

  • SoC – Allwinner V40 quad Core ARM Cortex A7 processor with ARM Mali-400MP2 GPU
  • System Memory – 1G DDR3 SDRAM
  • Storage – micro SD slot, SATA interface
  • Connectivity – 1x Gigabit Ethernet port, 802.11 b/g/n WiFi and Bluetooth 4.0 (AP6212 module)
  • Video Output – HDMI 1.4 port up to 1080p60, 4-lane MIPI DSI display connector
  • Audio I/O – HDMI, 3.5mm headphone jack, built-in microphone
  • USB – 4x USB 2.0 host ports, 1x micro USB OTG port
  • Camera – CSI camera connector
  • Expansion – 40-pin Raspberry Pi compatible header with GPIOs, I2C, SPI, UART, ID EEPROM, 5V, 3.3V, GND signals.
  • Debugging – 3-pin UART for serial console
  • Misc – Reset, power, and u-boot buttons
  • Power Supply – 5V via micro USB port; AXP221s PMIC
  • Dimensions – 85mm x 56mm

Compared with RPi3, BPi Berry adds a SATA port that allows the connection of an external hard disk or DVD/CDROM drive, which is convenient for applications that require lots of storage or faster throughput compared to USB memory sticks. Also there are differences in camera and display connectors, they are in the same place but with different sizes and the SD card slot is wider too.

BPi M2 Berry is available for about $45. For more details about the board visit the official announcement and take a look at this review on elektor.

XBEE X V2 FPV Racing Drone Kit

XBEE, the FPV racing drones manufacturer, had produced recently its new racing frame “XBEE X V2” for $75. It is a follow-up to the previous model “The XB-X Mk2” and it is a quad drone frame with a camera on its body. X V2 is designed with Wheelbase 220mm size guide.

First-person view (FPV) is also known as video piloting. Using this technique you can control a radio-controlled vehicle from the driver or pilot’s view point. The vehicle is either driven or piloted remotely from a first-person perspective via an onboard camera, fed wirelessly to video FPV goggles or a video monitor.

V2 Features:

  • Full Carbon Fiber.
  • 2mm Bottom Plate, 2mm Top Plate and 4mm arms
  • Matek PDB include(PDB-XPW W/ CURRENT SENSOR 140A & DUAL BEC)
  • Black steel screws(option titanium screws)
  • Transmitter mount include
  • weight : 79g

To build a full drone with the V2 frame you will need these parts with a total budget of about $450:

This video by X-FramesFPV will show you how to build XBEE X V2:

You can also follow this guide for detailed instructions of a full build of V2.

Mokacam Alpha, The World’s Smallest 4K Camera

Have you ever imagined to record your life at high quality with a small and an affordable camera? Mokacam, the camera producer company is making this possible. After the success of the first version, Mokacam had launched its new 4K camera, Alpha. Initially, Alpha is a smaller and more powerful version featuring Ambarella processor for 4K video to 120 FPS super slow motion. In addition, Alpha weighs only 79g and is sized 45x45mm.

Alpha is attachable to a shutter wheel to enable you shoot long exposure night photos. In Manual mode, you can turn the shutter wheel to set the shutter speed freely from 1/2000″ up to 32″. Additionally, you will forget completely the need of charging it again. Thanks to the built-in-battery feature, you can expect 4 hours continuous 1080P@30FPS video recording. Otherwise, you can add snap-on batteries and record forever!

Mokacam Alpha captures brighter image with more details under low light environment. The Ambrella image processor and the 1.55μm Sony image sensor provides features of 4K Ultra-HD or Full-HD 1/5 Speed Slow Motion video with incredible image quality.

Mokacam Alpha Features

Check this video to know the full features of Mokacam Alpha.

In this video you can find Mokacam Alpha compared to GoPro Hero 5 Black. Also, you can find below its competitive advantages.

Amazingly, Alpha was live on a crowdfunding campaign on Indigogo and it reached 1200% of its goal! You can check the official website and the product page for more details. Finally, you can pre-order Alpha now for $215 as a limited edition.