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Microchip SST26WF064C Flash Memory Chip

SST26WF064C – Low-voltage 64-Megabit SuperFlash® Memory Device From Microchip

Microchip introduced a new 64Mbit Serial Quad I/O memory device—SST26WF064C with proprietary SuperFlash® technology. The SST26WF064C writes with a single power supply of 1.65-1.95V and significantly lower power consumption. This makes it ideal for wireless, mobile, and battery-powered applications.

Microchip SST26WF064C Flash Memory Chip
Microchip SST26WF064C Flash Memory Chip

This 64Mbit memory device also features DTR or Dual Transfer Rate technology. DTR lets the user access data of the chip on both rising and falling edges of the clock, reducing overall data access time and power consumption significantly. The SST26WF064C utilizes a 4-bit multiplexed I/O serial interface to boost performance while maintaining the tiny form factor of standard serial flash devices.

Microchip’s high-performance CMOS SuperFlash technology provides the fastest chip erase time, consequently, reduces overall power consumption. It also improves performance and reliability of the memory chip. The SST26WF064C’s typical chip-erase time is 35-50 milliseconds, where other chips take nearly 30 seconds to be completely erased.

This chip combines a hardware controlled RESET function which is not present in common flash chips available in the market due to their limited pin count. In SST26WF064C, the user can program the HOLD pin to use for the RESET function. This feature lets the host microcontroller to reset the chip by sending a pulse to it.

SST26WF064C supports full command-set compatibility with traditional Serial Peripheral Interface (SPI) protocol. Operating at frequencies reaching 104 MHz, the SST26WF064C enables minimum latency execute-in-place (XIP) capability without the need for code shadowing on a SRAM. To learn about code shadowing, read this article.

The key features of the SST26WF064C are:

  • Single Voltage Read and Write Operations – 1.65-1.95V
  • Serial Interface Architecture
  • High-Speed Clock Frequency (104 MHz max.)
  • Burst Modes
  • Superior Reliability
  • Low Power Consumption
  • Fast Erase Time
  • Flexible Erase Capability
  • Suspend Program or Erase operation to access another block/sector
  • Software and Hardware Reset mode
  • Software Protection
  • Security ID
  • One-Time Programmable (OTP) 2KByte Secure ID
  • 64 bit unique, factory pre-programmed identifier
  • User-programmable area

To learn more about this memory chip or to purchase some, visit http://www.microchip.com/wwwproducts/en/SST26WF064C.

Turn Your iPad Into A Second Screen with Luna

It is possible now to turn your iPad into a second display using Luna Display! Luna Display is a hardware solution that extends your Mac desktop to your iPad, creating a wireless second monitor maintaining high resolution.

In fact, Luna is one of Astro HQ products, a startup working on delivering tools for designers and animation creators. It is originally  founded by two ex-Apple engineers, a reason to understand the loyalty for Apple products!

With no complicated settings, you can set up Luna in seconds using your already available Wi-Fi. This feature is Powered by Astro HQ LIQUID technology. Anyway if Wi-Fi is not available, USB can be the alternative.

 LIQUID technology provides:

  • Uncompromised image quality
  • Lightning fast speeds
  • Lag-free performance at 60 frames per second
  • GPU acceleration, so your Mac stays fast and optimized
  • Hand optimized ARM assembly to maximize battery life
  • Velocity Control, which analyzes network conditions dozens of times per second

System Requirements

Works with any modern Mac – Luna requires a Mac running macOS 10.10, Yosemite (or later). Recommended configurations: MacBook Air (2012 and later), MacBook Pro (2012 and later), Mac mini (2012 and later), iMac (2012 and later), Mac Pro (Late 2013).

Works with any modern iPad – Luna requires an iPad running iOS 9.1 (or later): iPad 2 (or later), any iPad Mini and any iPad Pro.

 

You can perfectly use Luna Display with the software Astropad, a software that allows you to draw directly into your Mac apps using your iPad and it works over wifi or USB.

“Luna extends both Astropad Standard and Astropad Studio to provide the ultimate drawing experience with the best second screen solution for iPad. If you are a creative professional, Luna has been designed with you in mind.”
Unlike other solutions, Luna uses the raw power of your graphics card, and harnesses it in order to allow you have the full potential of graphics acceleration. Check this video about the technology used in Luna Display, battery use and energy.

To know more about Luna, you can check the Kickstarter campaign they launched earlier.
Fortunately, the 1,450% funded campaign is still running and still has 39 days to go. You can pre-order your Luna Display gadget for 65$, or the Artist bundle for $99, including 1 Luna Display and 1 year Astropad Studio.

For more information and details, you can check the official website of Astropad and Astro HQ. Also, take a look at the campaign video here.

DNA Extruder – Fastest, Precision at Home Filament Extruder

Fastest consumer level extruder on the market. High quality & precision filament, thanks to a new & innovative approach to the process.

The 3D printing community is growing and innovating each day. Printers are becoming better and better, with higher print speeds, new features and capabilities. It is now time for the 3D printers’ counterpart, the filament extruder, to join the race.

Introducing the DNA Extruder, a never-before-seen combination of speed, precision, quality and aesthetics. An entirely new approach to the filament extrusion process.

DNA Extruder – Fastest, Precision at Home Filament Extruder – [Link]

Sculpto+: The world’s most user-friendly desktop 3D printer

Sculpto+ is a compact desktop 3D printer and app-based software that makes 3D printing more accessible than ever before.

3D printers are one of the coolest and most efficient ways for you to make your ideas go from the drawing board and into real life.

Two years ago we launched a new type of 3D printer on Kickstarter. We wanted to make the amazing world of 3D printing available to everyone – not just engineers and tech-savvy people. We believe everyone should be able to bring their ideas to life. We started delivering that dream a year ago and opened a world of 3D printing for regular people and schools all over Denmark. Since then we have refined our production and software while developing Sculpto+

Movidius Deep Learning USB Stick by Intel

Last week, Intel launched the Movidius Neural Compute Stick, which is a deep learning processor on a USB stick.

This USB stick was not an Intel invention. In fact, Intel had acquired Movidius company that had produced last year the world’s first deep learning processor on a USB stick based around their Myriad 2 Vision Processor.

Neural Compute Stick is based around the Movidius MA2150, the entry level chip in the Movidius Myriad 2 family of vision processing units (VPUs). Using this stick will allow you to add some artificial visual intelligence to your applications like drones and security cameras. 

Movidius Neural Compute Stick form factor device enables you prototype and tune your deep neural network. Moreover, the USB form factor connects to existing hosts and other prototyping platforms. At the same time, the VPU provides machine learning on a low-power inference engine.

Actually, the stick role comes after training your algorithm where it is ready to try real data. All you have to do is to translate your trained neural network from the desktop using the Movidius toolkit into an embedded application inside the stick. Later on, the toolkit will optimize this input to run on the Myriad 2 VPU. Note that your trained network should be compatible with Caffe deep learning framework.

It is a simple process

  1. Enter a trained Caffe
  2. Feed-forward Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) into the toolkit
  3. Profile it
  4. Compile a tuned version ready for embedded deployment using the Neural Compute Platform API.

An outstanding feature is that the stick can work without any connection to cloud or network connection, allowing to add smart features to really small devices with lower consumption. This feature may be on of the revolutionary ideas to start combining IoT and machine learning devices.

Neural Compute Stick Features

  • Supports CNN profiling, prototyping, and tuning workflow
  • All data and power provided over a single USB Type A port
  • Real-time, on device inference – cloud connectivity not required
  • Run multiple devices on the same platform to scale performance
  • Quickly deploy existing CNN models or uniquely trained networks
  • Features the Movidius VPU with energy-efficient CNN processing

“The Myriad 2 VPU housed inside the Movidius Neural Compute Stick provides powerful, yet efficient performance — more than 100 gigaflops of performance within a 1W power envelope — to run real-time deep neural networks directly from the device. This enables a wide range of AI applications to be deployed offline.” — Remi El-Ouazzane, VP and General Manager of Movidius.

At the moment, the stick SDK in only availble for x86, and there are some hints to expand platforms support. Meanwhile, developers are hoping to have ARM processor support since many of IoT applications rely on ARM processor. However, this may be not possible since the stick is an Intel product.

This stick is available for sale now, and costs $79. More information about how to get started with the stick is available on the Movidius developer site. Also check this video by Movidius:

 

290Hz Narrowband Laser On Chip For Numeros Photonic Applications

Researchers from the MESA+ research institute at University of Twente have collaborated together with the provider company of the customized microsystem solutions “LioniX International” to achieve the lowest bandwidth tunable diode laser on a chip.

The newly-developed laser operates in the IR region at 1550 nm with an 81 nm tuning range, which means that users can choose the color of the laser themselves, within a broad range. The laser is an integrated InP-Si3N4 hybrid laser consists of two different photonic chips, optically connected to each other.

Photonics is a key technology that makes numerous other innovations possible. So that, scientists and researchers are making big efforts at this field including deployment of photons for transporting and processing data.

To make photonic chips function as efficient as possible, we need to be able to control the light signals. Which means that all transmitted light particles should have the same frequency and wavelength as possible. The university researchers have succeeded developing a tiny laser on a chip with a maximum bandwidth of just 290 Hertz.

Our signal is more than ten times more coherent – or clean – than any other laser on a chip.
~ Professor Klaus Boller, the research leader

This record laser will have countless applications especially in fiber optic communications that require high data rate. This applications includes 5G mobile networks, accurate GPS systems and sensors for monitoring the structural integrity of buildings and bridges.

You can find out more details here.

Edgefx Kits, Get Your DIY Project Kit Now!

Aiming to bridge the gap between the academics and industry in electronics, communication and electrical sectors, Edgefx Technologies was born at 2012 as an online store for project solutions.

Edgefx provides practical skill building solutions to the engineering students in the form of Do It Yourself (DIY) project kits. These kits support wide areas of electronics and communication, and also the latest trends like IoT, Android, Arduino, Raspberry Pi and many more.

Edgefx kits are easy to use and self-explanatory. They come with hardware and training material in the form of extensive audio-visuals and can be purchased online.

The company has grown to have a very strong focus on customer service, quality and morale of the staff and most of all, a passion for what we do. And although we’re a team of almost 30 right now, nothing about us is corporate. We don’t have multiple tiers of hierarchy. The vast majority of our employees work on the front lines, taking care of our customers or shipping items out of the Edgefx Fulfillment Centers.

The website contains more than 200 projects in about 15 different categories. Kits prices range from Rs. 1500 to Rs. 50000 (~ $23 to $750). In addition to the project kits, Edgefx also conducts practical workshops in colleges and schools.

School students, starting from 8 years old, can opt for school electronic projects that empowering them to innovate. It includes three basic level STEM kits and one intermediate level kit. All of these kits are edutainment and fun, with real time applications using latest technologies, and also can create multiple experiments.

Each basic kit has a three project inside, these projects are:

  • Security protection for museum items
  • Touch controlled fan
  • Touch me not LED warning
  • Bike theft alarm
  • Upside down  indicator for fragile item
  • Toll gate auto light LED
  • Security area protecting alarm
  • Auto door opening motor
  • Human detection under debries

The intermediate kit is an Arduino project kit. This project is designed for digital sensors solder-less Arduino projects on breadboard. It will light flasher of different color light on single LED each time on sensing finger swipe with the help of IR obstacle sensor. Also, the project makes different unique sounds on sensing each time.

Beginners Arduino Project Kit

So, if you are searching for some project kits you have to visit the Edgefx store, explore the kits to find the project you want to make and then order it. In the end, don’t forget to share with us your experience once you buy and use the kit!

96-Layer Memory Chips By Toshiba

The need for larger memory storage for smartphones will never stop, especially with the continuous development of larger and stronger applications. This need is always pushing semiconductor manufacturers to keep trying to fit as much bits as possible in  smaller volumes and with lower costs.

To achieve this, memory chips are now growing in three dimensions instead of two. Recently, Toshiba has developed a new 96-layer BiCS 3D flash memory device with a storage capacity of 32 GB. The new device meets market demands and performance specifications for applications that include enterprise and consumer SSD, smartphones, tablets and memory cards.

This memory chip was built with three bits per cell, known as triple-level cell (TLC) technology. Stacking layers and manufacturing process increase the capacity of each chip with 40% per unit size. They also reduce the cost per bit, and increase the manufacturability of memory capacity per silicon wafer.

In order to add more layers to the chip, Toshiba is working on increasing the number of bits in every cell. In the near future, it will apply its new 96-layer process technology to larger capacity products, such as 64 GB. It will also develop chips with QLC (quadruple-level cell) technology.

By stacking 64 layers of QLCs, the engineers at Toshiba have created a 96-gigabyte device. Integrating 16 of them in one package will achieve a capacity of 1.5 TB, that corresponds to 12 trillion bits.

If you are interested, you can check these out at the 2017 Flash Memory Summit in Santa Clara, California from August 7-10.

Source: elektor

RandA, Combining Raspberry Pi & Arduino

Two years ago, open electronics had produced “RandA“, an Atmega328-based board for Raspberry Pi to deliver the advantages of both, Raspberry Pi and Arduino. Earlier this month, an updated version of RandA has been released to be compatible with Raspberry Pi 3.

RandA is a development board that leverages the hardware equipment and the computing power of Arduino with its shields, and the enormous potential of the Raspberry Pi. It features Atmega328 microcontroller, has RTC (Real Time Clock) module, power button and sleep timer, connectors for 5 volts and connectors for mounting Arduino shield.

Combining these two platforms is a way to exploit specific characteristics of both. Raspberry Pi could use Arduino as configurable device, and Arduino might work as a controller for Raspberry Pi allowing access to complex environments like the network, allowing complex processing or access to multimedia.

RandA was created at first for Raspberry Pi 2 and B+, using the first 20 pins to connect them, the serial port for programming the Atmega328 and for communication with Raspberry Pi. With the enhancements that come with the third version of Raspberry Pi, such as upgrading CPU to a quad-core 64 bit ARMv8 clocked at 1.2 GHz and adding WiFi and Bluetooth transceivers, there were some structure modifications that require updating the RandA.

Raspberry Pi 3 uses the standard UART0 serial port for connection via the Bluetooth interface equipping version 3. Therefore, it is no longer available on GPIO14/15 as it was in the first and second version of Raspberry Pi. The secondary UART1 serial is configured on those pins instead, but this serial port is based on a simulated serial not on a preset UART hardware. In particular, its clock is connected to the frequency of the clock of the system which varies in function of the load in order to save energy.

To solve this, the software is configured to recover the UART0 on GPIO 14/15 pins without modifying any hardware parts. This way will disable the Bluetooth peripheral, but the WiFi is still working and you can use Bluetooth by connecting a Bluetooth dongle via USB.

To know more about the new version of RandA you can review this post, and reading this post to learn more about RandA in general. You can get your RandA board for about $36 and this tutorial will help you get starting with it.

Cinque, Combining RISC-V With Arduino

After announcing “HiFive1” at the end of 2016, SiFive is introducing its second RISC-V based development board “The Arduino Cinque“. It is the first Arduino board that is featuring RISC-V instruction set architecture.

Arduino Cinque is running SiFive’s Freedom E310, one of the fastest and powerful microcontrollers in the hardware market. It also includes built-in Wi-Fi and Bluetooth capabilities by using the efficient, low-power Espressif ESP32 chip. During the Maker Faire Bay Area on May 20th, only some prototypes of Arduino Cinque were available for demonstration.

The FE310 SoC features the E31 CPU Coreplex (32-bit RV32IMAC Core) with 16KB L1 instruction cache and 16KB data SRAM scratchpad. It runs at 320 MHz operating speed and it also has a debugging module, one-time programmable non-volatile memory (OTP), and on-chip oscillators and PLLS. FE310 also supports UART, QSPI, PWM, and timer peripherals and low-power standby mode.

The availability of the Arduino Cinque provides the many dreamers, tinkerers, professional makers and aspiring entrepreneurs access to state-of-the-art silicon on one of the world’s most popular development architectures. Using an open-source chip built on top of RISC-V is the natural evolution of open-source hardware, and the Arduino Cinque has the ability to put powerful SiFive silicon into the hands of makers around the world.
~ Dale Dougherty, founder and executive chairman of Maker Media

Details and other specifications of the Cinque are still poor, but we can expect its strength from the chips and SoCs it uses. It uses STM32F103, that has Cortex-M3 core with a maximum CPU speed of 72 MHz, to provide the board with USB to UART translation. ESP32 is also used as for Wi-Fi and Bluetooth connectivity.

Espressif ESP32 Specifications

  • 240 MHz dual core Tensilica LX6 micrcontroller
  • 520KB SRAM
  • 802.11 BGN HT40 Wi-Fi transceiver, baseband, stack, and LWIP
  • Classic and BLE integrated dual mode Bluetooth
  • 16 MB flash memory
  • On-board PCB antenna
  • IPEX connector for use with external antenna
  • Ultra-low noise analog amplifier
  • Hall sensor
  • 32 KHz crystal oscillator
  • GPIOs for UART, SPI, I2S, I2C, DAC, and PWM
A first look at the RISC-V-based Arduino Cinque, a SiFive R&D project.
A first look at the RISC-V-based Arduino Cinque, a SiFive R&D project.

The RISC-V Foundation is working to spread the idea and the benefits of the open-source ISA. Its efforts include hosting workshops, participating in conferences, and collaborating with academia and industry. The foundation had also worked with researchers from Princeton University to identify flaws with the ISA design. They presented their findings at the 22nd ACM International Conference on Architectural Support for Programming Languages and Operating Systems.