Software category – A True Version Control For Managing Hardware Projects

Version control is a system that records changes of a file or set of files over time so that you can recall specific versions later. Version control was developed to help teams work on tasks together in a more collaborative way. In the last few years, version control platform has often been focused on software-based projects. Git is the preferred version control tool for most developers since it has multiple advantages over the other systems available and it’s the backbone of the famous GitHub. Version Control

So, version control tools are great for software tasks, but what about Hardware? Unlike open software, which has popular collaborative tools like Git (and websites built on it, like GitHub), Subversion, and Mercurial, hardware has no system for version control. Github has been used in the past for hardware project sharing and even offer some level of version control (very limited, hardware design are displayed as an image). For software, version control is pretty straightforward, since you can just show the “diffs” between two files as highlighted text. But how do you do that for hardware, where the files tend to be in binary formats, which could be proprietary sometimes? from DevEngineering brings a change in this space. is a cloud-based hardware development platform which provides engineers and makers with a version control system and collaboration tools for hardware design. Based on Git, it allows you to keep native PCB design files in a repository and view, compare and comment on any part of a PCB in a browser. Cadlab is designed for hardware designs and not just comparing design images, but truly compare PCB and schematics designs.

Just like Github, supports public and private projects. CADLAB allows users to create an unlimited number of public projects for various hardware project and even upgrade those project to private mode only, but this comes at a cost. CADLAB currently supports only Autodesk EAGLE PCB designs with promises of adding more support to other PCB design software like KiCAD, Altium, OrCAD, and others. CADLAB can render all your Autodesk Eagle PCB schematics and layouts from version 6 upwards. You can compare design iterations, find the necessary ones quickly, download it and continue working on it in the CAD application.

CADLAB provides support for adding comments and even annotations to a design file. Annotations can be added to pad or a block of wires, and this will profoundly foster good collaboration between teams and also make hardware project to be easily scalable. Github users are not left behind, CADLAB integrates with GitHub. Existing GitHub design can be viewed with CADLAB and users are allowed to even upload their files directly from Github. With a CADLAB Chrome plugin, users can see their design files live while working on Github.

Despite the robust features with CADLAB, it doesn’t yet support merge request and forks, a primary functionality of version control and open source project. Merge requests and forks will allow people to contribute to a public project. is currently available in a three subscription package. A free plan for public only projects, an Individual plan that costs $6 per month, and a Company plan that costs $15 per month. You can find more information about the pricing here.

STM32CubeProgrammer all- in-one software tool

STM32CubeProgrammer (STM32CUBEPROG) is an all-in-one multi-OS software tool for programming STM32 microcontrollers. It provides an easy-to-use and efficient environment for reading, writing and verifying device memory through both the debug interface (JTAG and SWD) and the bootloader interface (UART and USB). STM32CubeProgrammer offers a wide range of features to program STM32 microcontroller internal memories (such as Flash, RAM, and OTP) as well as external memories. STM32CubeProgrammer also allows option programming and upload, programming content verification, and microcontroller programming automation through scripting. STM32CubeProgrammer is delivered in GUI (graphical user interface) and CLI (command-line interface) versions.

EAGLE 8.7 – Parametric 2D & 3D model generation,, more!

Today we’re proud to announce the release of EAGLE 8.7 and what is quite possibly one of the biggest releases we’ve had to-date, this time focused (largely) on libraries and library development (and what that means for 3D modeling of your finished PCB)!  But before we get into it, let me share a thought —

As some of you know, most of us on the EAGLE team use the SW (imagine that!).  In fact, it’s the overwhelming majority in development, mktg, leadership, support, etc. who not only use it, but we’ve run workshops, taught university courses with it, etc.  And it’s from the experience of talking with you and having to explain many of the more idiosyncratic things either in EAGLE or in ECAD in general, that we’d decided we needed to take a shot at addressing the component creation process.  Our goal being to reduce or eliminate one of the slowest, most non-value added processes in your workflow. (This is the stuff that really slows you down and only gets harder as the parts get more sophisticated.)

That being said, this is only part of our ongoing efforts to make library development and the problems with quick, quality component creation faced by so many users (whether professionals or hobbyists or students) a thing of the past.  It’s also the first step in treating ECAD parts and their MCAD equivalents as a single component creation process which shouldn’t be decoupled (after all, it’s the same datasheet whether you’re making parts in EAGLE or in Fusion360).

EAGLE 8.7 – Parametric 2D & 3D model generation,, more! – [Link]

Digi-Key launches a common parts library for the KiCad EDA Tool

Digi-Key Electronics has announced that it is in beta release of a library containing almost 1,000 common parts for the open-source KiCad schematic capture and PCB tool. By Ally Winning @

The library will be hosted on the Digi-Key website. It was built after Digi-Key analyzed the top 1,000 parts that KiCad users would require. The library combines schematic symbols and PCB footprints into atomic elements and adds fields including part numbers and datasheet links. As the library has the same license as KiCad’s main library, it is freely available to all developers. The final release of the library is planned for early 2018.

Digi-Key launches a common parts library for the KiCad EDA Tool – [Link]

SimScale is Teaching Electronics Engineers How to Test Designs with Cloud-based CFD

Munich, January 9, 2018 — SimScale is announcing a free webinar on 24th of January to teach electronics engineers how conjugate heat transfer simulation in the cloud can help better investigate the thermal response of electronic packaging.

According to the Electrical and Electronic Manufacturing Market Briefing 2017 report from The Business Research Company (TBRC), the global electrical and electronics manufacturing market is expected to reach $3 trillion by 2020.

In such an innovation-driven and competitive industry, engineers deal with increasingly stringent thermal requirements due to the rapid increase in high-power density electronics. Thermal integrity is one of the most important considerations for electronics packaging or enclosures that affect the product lifecycle. The thermal impact on the electronic packaging is a key factor in material selection, cooling and form-related decisions that eventually determine the weight, size, and cost of the final design. It is vital for designers to determine the heat signatures of their system. (more…)

Bomist – Parts Inventory and BOM Management for Electronics

It all started a few years ago with Component Organizer, than BOMER and it’s now called BOMIST. The software runs locally, so no server nor setup required and you can have as many databases as you want (just run as many instances of BOMIST as you want). Additionally, it is integrated with Octopart, meaning you get plenty of useful real-time data: datasheets, descriptions, package names, values, prices as well as other useful information are automatically fetched online. Also, importing data into BOMIST is VERY easy which means you’ll get up and running in no time. BOMIST will keep improving, many new features are already inline and your feedback is always greatly appreciated. Give it a try, it’s FREE.

PcbDraw – KiCAD board into a nice looking 2D drawing

Convert your KiCAD boards into nice looking 2D drawings suitable for pinout diagrams. Never draw them manually again! [via]

Jan Mrázek created a Python script that takes a KiCAD board (.kicad_pcb file) and produces a 2D nice looking drawing of the board as an SVG file.

This small Python script takes a KiCAD board (.kicad_pcb file) and produces a 2D nice looking drawing of the board as an SVG file. This allows you to quickly and automatically create awesome pinout diagrams for your project. These diagrams are much easier to read than a labeled photo of a physical board or an actual KiCAD design.

PcbDraw – KiCAD board into a nice looking 2D drawing – [Link]

How to install ExaGear Desktop Trial on Odroid

And play more than 38 famous Windows games on your device with ExaGear software.

Odroid is a great development mini PC board to make different IoT or other tech projects on. Needless to describe all the advantages of this marvelous device, as any reader of this post is likely to be really into this growing community.

But if you are new to these boards, there are a bunch of resources to educate yourself. Read their Odroid magazine, ask questions on their forum and explore the details on their Wiki pages (Find the models and prices on Odroid store).

In this article, is going to release the tutorial on how to set up an ExaGear Software trial on Odroid devices. But, first of all, let me give you a brief introduction of what the ExaGear software is for.

ExaGear Desktop is a powerful emulator for porting almost any x86 applications to ARM-based devices. In a nutshell, if you need some Windows apps or on your Odroid for any specific purpose (e.g. Notepad++ or even MS Word), ExaGear is the best solution to make it happen. Not mentioning the fact, that some native Linux applications, such as Skype and TeamViewer, when launched within ExaGear run even faster than launched via Wine on Linux. If you need more information visit our product page!

How to install ExaGear Desktop Trial on Odroid – [Link]

PCB123® launches access to millions of cloud-based symbols & footprints

Designers can now search SnapEDA’s vast component library directly in PCB123

MULINO, OR and SAN FRANCISCO, CA (September 13, 2017) — Today, Sunstone Circuits, creators of the free PCB design tool, PCB123, and SnapEDA, the Internet’s first parts library for circuit board design, are launching a new integration that allows designers to search for digital models directly inside the PCB123 design environment.

Designers have traditionally wasted days creating digital models for their designs. This process is tedious, time-consuming, and error-prone. With today’s release of PCB123 Version 5.6, designers can now search and download free, cloud-based symbols and footprints directly during design capture and layout, significantly boosting design productivity.

“For forty years, PCB designers have frittered away countless hours defining parts because there simply wasn’t a workable, affordable source for accurate, ready-made parts. In fact, surveys show that most professional designers spend an average of 30-35% of their design time just making new parts definitions before they can even get started,” said Nolan Johnson, CAD & EDA Product Marketing Manager at Sunstone Circuits.

“SnapEDA has disrupted that dynamic in an easy-to-use, no-cost utility, and PCB123 is proud to be bringing true in-tool integration of SnapEDA’s parts search functions to our loyal users – in a free PCB CAD tool, no less,” Johnson added.

PCB123 is a free, full-function PCB CAD tool, comprised of a schematic editor, physical layout editor, 3-dimensional mechanical previews, and BOM editor. By augmenting the tool with cloud-based libraries, designers will get real-time access to new symbols & footprints added to SnapEDA’s catalog, as well the ability to request parts they need for their designs with InstaPart, the company’s popular 24 hour parts request service.

“PCB123 has just released the industry’s first pre-installed integration of a cloud-based parts library. Their impressive solution will benefit PCB designers with access to vetted parts models that will shave days off design time, and benefit the world through faster innovation,” said Natasha Baker, Founder & CEO of SnapEDA.

All new models created by SnapEDA conform to the latest IPC standards (IPC-7351B) and are vetted with its patent-pending verification technology. Design content is available for millions of electronic components, enabled by SnapEDA’s proprietary, automated library creation, translation, and verification technology.

A Compact Camera Using Raspberry Pi A+ And Adafruit TFT Display

PiJuice at designed an interesting compact camera project with raspberry pi. Raspberry Pi A+ is used in this project as it is the cheapest and smallest available Raspberry Pi. The real challenge in this kind of portable Pi projects is powering the Raspberry Pi. This issue is solved using PiJuice—an all in one battery module for the Raspberry Pi.

Required Parts

Required parts to make Raspberry Pi compact camera
Required parts to make Raspberry Pi compact camera

Set Up The Raspberry Pi

Download the latest version of the Raspbian image from the Raspberry Pi Website and burn it on your blank SD card. You can use win32DiskImager or your favorite software to get the job done. Now, you need to install the drivers for the TFT screen by running the DIY installer script, explained on the Adafruit page. Connect the TFT to the Raspberry Pi, attach the PiJuice with a charged battery, and switch it on. Your screen now should display boot up messages.

Connect The Camera

Insert the ribbon cable of your camera module properly ensuring that the blue side of the ribbon is facing away from the HDMI port. Now, go to the terminal and type the following command,

sudo raspi-config

Enable the camera in the menu and then reboot the Pi. The camera should work properly after a successful reboot. To test the camera, enter the following command:

raspistill -o pic.jpg

This will take a snap and save it in the /home/pi directory.

Connect A Push Button

You need a push button to simulate a shutter action. Locate the pin 17 on the GPIO breakout on the top of the TFT screen. Now, solder two wires to the terminals of the push button. You can either solder a right angle header to the pin 17 or you can directly solder one wire from push button to that pin. There is a pad labeled WP on the board. It is actually connected to the ground. Solder another wire from the push button to this pad.

Install And Test The PiCam Software

To install the software, the Raspberry Pi must be connected to the internet. Enter the commands given below to download and install PiCam.

sudo apt-get install git-core
sudo mkdir PiCam
cd /PiCam
git clone git://

Once the software has been downloaded, navigate to the PiCam directory using the command:

cd /picam

You can run it by typing the command:

sudo python

Now, you can take pictures by simply pressing the push button. Once the button is pressed the picture will be taken. Once the captured image gets loaded, your photograph will be displayed.

Taking photograph with Raspberry Pi compact camera
Taking photograph with Raspberry Pi compact camera


Your Raspberry Pi camera is ready now. If you want to make it even more compact as well as portable, grab the official laser-cut compact camera case from the Kickstarter page by pre-ordering a Maker Kit. You can also build your own simple chassis for housing the camera.