Test/Measurements category

Pokit – Multimeter, Oscilloscope & Logger in your pocket

Pokit – Multimeter, Oscilloscope & Logger in your pocket – [Link]

Physicists design $100 handheld muon detector

by Jennifer Chu | MIT News Office:

Now physicists working in MIT’s Laboratory for Nuclear Science have designed a pocket-sized cosmic ray muon detector to track these ghostly particles. The detector can be made with common electrical parts, and when turned on, it lights up and counts each time a muon passes through. The relatively simple device costs just $100 to build, making it the most affordable muon detector available today.

Physicists design $100 handheld muon detector – [Link]

Continuity Tester using ATtiny85

This article describes a simple continuity tester based on an ATtiny85. The tester features a buzzer that sounds to help you determinate the trace continuity. It is designed for checking circuit wiring, or tracing out the tracks on a PCB. According to it’s author David Johnson-Davies it has a low threshold resistance of 50Ω to avoid false positives, and passes less than 0.1mA through the circuit under test, to avoid affecting sensitive components. It’s powered from a small button cell, and automatically switches itself off when not in use, avoiding the need for an on/off switch.

HeartyPatch – Open source ECG patch with Wifi

An ECG patch with HRV monitoring that’s open source, affordable, and Wi-Fi/Bluetooth connected.

HeartyPatch is a completely open source, single-lead, ECG-HR wearable patch with HRV (Heart Rate Variability) analysis. It is based on the popular ESP32 system-on-a-chip. By using low-cost, highly-integrated components, we are able to keep the BOM’s cost low, while the simplicity of the circuit design means future expansion will be easier. HeartyPatch can be used both as a lifestyle device for managing fitness and stress as well as for diagnostics and medical research, with the potential for even more interesting applications.

HeartyPatch – Open source ECG patch with Wifi – [Link]

Four-Channel Thermometer on OLED display

David Johnson-Davies @ technoblogy.com build a four-channel thermometer that monitors the temperature at four temperature sensors, and gives a continuous readout on a small 128×32 OLED display. It’s a useful project for various applications like PSU or PC monitoring. The article describes 1-wire and code in details.

It could be used in any application where you want to monitor multiple temperatures, such as in controlling a greenhouse, checking the output transistors in a power amplifier, monitoring key points in an overclocked gaming PC, monitoring the chips on a Raspberry Pi, or checking the temperature in different rooms in a home.

Four-Channel Thermometer on OLED display – [Link]

Rigol general-purpose 200MHz scopes from under €600

RIGOL Technologies introduces its new DS2000E Series Oscilloscope, a 200MHz, 2 channel scope that continues RIGOL‘s tradition of combining unmatched capabilities at unprecedented price points to transform the test and measurement industry.

The DS2000E is available at either 100MHz or 200MHz bandwidths.  All models provide 2 analog channels with 50 Ω input impedance standard.  With real-time sample rate of 1GS/Sec (on both channels), memory depth of up to 28Mpts standard, and waveform capture rate up to 50,000 wfms/sec, the DS2000E provides the raw instrument performance required to meet today’s more advanced debug challenges.  When coupled with the large 8 inch WVGA intensity graded display, complete network connectivity, hardware waveform record/playback, serial trigger and decode, and other advanced analysis capabilities, starting at just $647, engineers and technicians will see RIGOL has again transformed the price performance assumptions in the Basic Oscilloscope Market.

Rigol general-purpose 200MHz scopes from under €600 – [Link]

Open Radiation Detector

Quickly identify radioactive materials with a pocket-sized ion chamber. Built from standard parts for easy manufacture and low cost. by Carlos Garcia Saura:

Radioactivity is invisible and can be harmful to life. The goal of this project is to provide a simple device that could prevent cases of radiation poisoning. Professional radiation meters can be very accurate, but are also expensive, complex and fragile (most use vacuum discharge tubes made of glass). However in many occasions we only want to determine whether an object is radioactive or not.

Open Radiation Detector – [Link]

MappyDot – Micro Smart LiDAR Sensor

Blecky @ hackaday.io:

MappyDot is a smart ranging sensor which provides system designers with the ability to measure accurate distances on drones and robotic platforms for collision avoidance, area mapping, distance measurement, gesture recognition and motion sensing. The MappyDot uses the VL53L0X laser time-of-flight ranging sensor from STMicroelectronics, which is a tried and tested 940nm Class 1 laser sensor in use in millions of devices worldwide.

MappyDot – Micro Smart LiDAR Sensor – [Link]

Design and Implementation of a 12 Lead Portable ECG

Alex Lao and his team at McMaster University have developed a compact, battery powered, 12-lead electro-cardiogram:

During the academic year of 2016-2017 at McMaster University, in conjunction with Dr. DeBruin, Christina Riczu, Thomas Phan and Emilie Corcoran, we developed a compact, battery powered, 12-lead electro-cardiogram. The project won 1st place in the biomedical category at the ECE Capstone Poster Day.

Design and Implementation of a 12 Lead Portable ECG – [Link]

Haasoscope – Cheap, flexible, data acquisition for all!

Haasoscope is the first open-source, open-hardware, flexible, small, cheap, oscilloscope and data-acquisition board. You can use the stock firmware for basic oscilloscope functionality, or modify the firmware to customize what the Haasoscope does.

Preliminary features and specifications:

  • 4 x 100 MHz, 8-bit ADC channels with BNC cable inputs
  • Altera Max10 FPGA with 8k logic elements and 387kb of memory
  • Reprogram firmware over JTAG, or on the fly, with free Quartus II software
  • Readout over serial-to-USB at 1.5 Mb/s, about 20 Hz for 4 channels of 512 samples each
  • USB powered, (or other 5 V input, switchable), ~1.2 Watt
  • 8 x spare digital I/O
  • 9 x additional analog I/O with 1 MHz (1MSPS combined) at 12 bits
  • 7 x programmable LEDs, and a reset button

Haasoscope – Cheap, flexible, data acquisition for all! – [Link]