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Author Topic: 5V Inductive Charger Design  (Read 2872 times)
pmitch
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« on: August 30, 2012, 09:26:00 PM »

I need to design a 5V inductive charging system.

I will be using a 12V DC input voltage and require a 5V DC (500ma or more) voltage output.

Does anyone have any ideas where I can start? I need to build this from the ground up and need to start with my electronic schematic designs and then protoype and test.

Thanks in advance.
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KevinIV
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« Reply #1 on: September 10, 2012, 07:10:39 PM »

A 5v charging system, I'll guess to charge a 5v battery, will include resistors and capacitors too. The idea is to start with a higher voltage and a regulate the ouput at 5v. Automobile battery chargers are suited for general auto battery charging, while others are designed to charge less durable, higher technology small capacity batteries. What's the capacity or Amp/hr rating of the battery?
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KevinIV
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« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2012, 07:30:50 PM »

Another aspect, is not only will the 5v charging system need to regulate at 5v, it must also not overcharge a low battery to quickly. The same as the slow charge fast charge switch on an automobile battery charger.
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indulis
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« Reply #3 on: October 10, 2012, 11:27:49 AM »

Look up a buck converter...
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KevinIV
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« Reply #4 on: October 10, 2012, 06:39:11 PM »

Indulis, are buck converters used very often? They're not standard regulators which I have seen more often. Maybe they can only be used for certain applications.
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hemiyat
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« Reply #5 on: October 14, 2012, 11:58:19 AM »

Yes, the buck converters often be used for certain applications, like the fridge, I checked some, a little complex. trying for another best one.
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KevinIV
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« Reply #6 on: October 17, 2012, 04:21:39 PM »

A sort of variation of a buck converter could be used in this case. A simple fixed pulse width generator can allow the control opamp to supply input to a regular 5V voltage regulator. An electrolytic capacitor would be needed at the input to the regulator. The opamp could be made stabile enough out of saturation, possibly.
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KevinIV
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« Reply #7 on: October 30, 2012, 06:15:33 PM »

An opamp can be used out of saturation to amplify a digital signal. A very high gain, which would not be needed with the 12v signal from the pulse width generator, would be less stabile.
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