NiteFury – An Artix-7 FPGA for developing PCIe

NiteFury – An Artix-7 FPGA for developing PCIe

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An Artix-7 FPGA with its own DDR3 RAM right in your laptop – for developing PCIe, etc.

NiteFury is an Artix-7 FPGA development board in an M.2 form-factor that includes on-board DDR3 RAM. This combination lets you work with PCI Express at incredible rates from inside your laptop or desktop. You can also use NiteFury as an FPGA co-processor. Let Xilinx’s largest Artix-7 handle your encryption or act as a hardware-level encoder/decoder for speedy workflows. It’s your FPGA, design what you like.

NiteFury Features

  • Giant FPGA: NiteFury features the largest Artix-series part that Xilinx makes. It has six times the processing power of PicoEVB. It uses the Xilinx A200T FPGA at just under 1000 GMAC/s.
  • On-board RAM: The faster you process with an Artix-7, the more you may need to store. The on-board DDR3, 4 Gb (512 MB x 16) RAM keeps data within arms reach and takes the burden off your computer.
  • Popular Form Factor: NiteFury fits in the M.2 M key slot, which is popular in laptops today. This slot features 4x PCIe for high bandwidth (2 GB/s). Why keep your FPGA on your desk when you can take it with you?
  • Affordable: Buying the Xilinx Artix-7 XC7A200T FPGA alone would generally cost around $250. By teaming up with another company, NiteFury gives you all that power with little additional cost (especially during the campaign).
  • Open Source: Because company is good to have, NiteFury is open source hardware. The board repository is at https://github.com/RHSResearchLLC/NiteFury.
  • Expandable: With twelve external I/O in total, four of which are selectable as either analog or digital, you aren’t just confined to interfacing via computer. The connectors used in the design are easy to find Pico-EZmates and a DF52.

The project is live on crowdsupply.com and has 42 days left to be funded. For $329 your get the original NiteFury, with the largest Artix FPGA and 4 Gb DDR3.

Mike is the founder and editor of Electronics-Lab.com, an electronics engineering community/news and project sharing platform. He studied Electronics and Physics and enjoys everything that has moving electrons and fun. His interests lying on solar cells, microcontrollers and switchmode power supplies. Feel free to reach him for feedback, random tips or just to say hello :-)

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