Tag Archives: 3D printing

Da Vinci Color, The First Full Color 3D Printer

3D Printing became an important process in prototyping, and sometimes in manufacturing. But till now, the filament types available in the market are limiting printing colors. Although there are many multi color printers, printing a design in full color is still a dream.

XYZprinting has announced its da Vinci Color printer, the world’s first full color 3D printer. In fact, the printer combines inkjet techniques with Fused Filament Fabrication (FFF). It uses ink cartridges to drop pigment onto each layer of plastic filament as it prints.

da Vinci Color Specification

  • Build volume: 200 x 200 x 150 mm
  • Layer resolution: 100-400 microns (0.1-0.4 mm)
  • Filament material: 3D Color-inkjet PLA / PLA / Tough PLA / PETG
  • Ink type: Separate ink cartridge (CMYK)
  • Nozzle diameter: 0.4 mm
  • Print bed: EZ-removable print bed (non-heated)
  • Print bed leveling: Auto-leveling
  • XYZ position precision: X/Y 12.5 micron, Z 4 micron
  • Build speed: Average: 30-60 mm/sec, Max: 120mm /sec
  • Print head travel speed: 30 – 300 mm/s
  • Host software: XYZmaker
  • File type: AMF, PLY, OBJ, STL, 3CP
  • Power requirements: 100-240 V, 50-60 HZ
  • Connectivity: WiFi, USB 2.0 port
  • Operating temperature: 15-30℃

Fortunately, the printing base area of ​​20 x 20 x 15 cm provides a large build volume in a relatively small housing. The machine prints at an average resolution of 100-400 microns, so the lines where two colors meet can get a little blurry when viewed up close, but the output is generally pretty impressive. It’s basically an ink jet printer that outputs in 3D, so the results aren’t quite as sharp as a professional production job.

In addition, the software is easy to use and supports most common 3D file formats, amf, ply, obj, stl, and 3cp. Users of any age can download designs and add colors, or create their own colored prototypes from scratch. Thus, with an embedded color touch screen, users can control the printer and do some setting easily, such as connecting to the home wireless network. Also, da Vinci Color has many sensors that indicate broken material during the printing process, allowing users to save time and filament.

Applications of da Vinci Color printer

This types of 3D printer may have a several areas of applications, some of them according to the manufacturer are:

  • Animation and film: Enables production of prototypes in color that can be used immediately after printing
  • Architects and designers: The production of solid models, miniatures and prototypes provides customers with a better appreciation of design concepts.
  • Small businesses: The 3D printer helps to create your own company models and products with 3D full-color printing. Color printing reduces costs and speeds up production. The use of PLA filaments ensures that time and money is not wasted on post-processing.
  • Schools: Enables color printing by students in 3D, let their creativity run wild.
  • Model makers and collectors: All types of model figures and accessories can be produced including comic book figures rendered in authentic colors. You can also print the original designs.

The printer price is $3,500. But it is available now for pre-ordering for only $3,000 on XYZ official store, with estimated shipping date at the end of November. Beyond that, you have to buy four ink cartridges (cyan, magenta, yellow, and black) for $65 each, and you need a special filament that works with the ink, which costs $35 per roll.

Bulgarian National Innovator Creative Spaces

Few days ago, a group of 10 young and experienced people launched a Kickstarter campaign for their new socially significant project “Innovator Creative Spaces“. It is a national network of co-working spaces that cover the whole country of Bulgaria.

The goal of this project is to build creative centers that provide hi-tech workshops for software development and hardware prototypes. It will also have modern tools for prototyping and production laboratories, focused on digital technology, electronics and production technologies.

The creative spaces are targeting enthusiasts, young entrepreneurs and researchers, providing them with required tools and environment to design, make, hack, invent and learn. Their long term goal is to turn Bulgaria into the Silicon Valley of Eastern Europe.

This list of tools is planned to be held in the labs:

  • 3D printers and 3D scanners
  • Laser cutter
  • CNC router
  • CNC lathe
  • Water cutting (water jet cutter)
  • Advanced circuits Lab LPKF Protolaser S
  • CNC PCB Plotter
  • Internet of Things
  • Virtual Reality lab
  • Open Hardware lab
  • Arduino kits
  • Sewing Machines
  • Sergers
  • Embrodiery machines
  • Knitting machines, Soldering irons, Grinders, Vises, Electrocautery
  • Woodworking Facilities
  • Assembly test
  • Other electronic equipment, woodworking tools, measurement gadgets such as micrometer, calipers, etc. And other tools (needed for hacking, creating or fixing just about any project)

Besides the main advantages, the teams see that the co-working spaces will also help building a friendly, encouraging, collaborative and supportive community. The community would enable specialists to enjoy a higher standard of living, achieved by qualification training and mentorship.

At the first phase of the project, only 500 of 1300 square meters will be used. The space includes workshops for different types of machines, separated mini-offices, bar and kitchen, library, conference room, exhibition area, and assembly area.

In addition to membership subscription, the project will provide makers with other services such as prototyping, 3D printing, laser cutting, mentoring and business development, design and branding, events consultations , and more.

We are confident that our project not only helps to deal with youth unemployment, but also improves the re-qualification opportunities and entrepreneurship by discovering new possibilities for personal development in Bulgaria. We believe that the future of our country is in the capable hands of young and pro-active people and gives the fact that a lot of successful start-ups around the world.

If you are interested in supporting this project, you can do that by backing it on Kickstarter and by sharing it with you friends.

Meet Bean: The Ultimate Consumer SLA 3D Printer

Kudo3D Inc. is a startup company dedicated to bringing 3D printing technologies to consumers. It released the first generation 3D printer, the Titan 1, via a very successful Kickstarter campaign in 2014. Since then, they launched their second generation printers, the Titan 2 and Titan 2 HR. Now, they are releasing Bean 3D printer, the ultimate SLA printer for consumers.

Bean 3D printer  is a high resolution, affordable, and reliable resin SLA printer created with the consumer in mind. The quality  of resin printers with the affordability of FDM printers are the key features of Bean! The stylish 3D printer is green from inside and outside; its green cover makes it look so elegant and the embedded LEDs allow a greener energy consumption and longer lifetime. It is also affordable since the team had combined their PSP (passive self-peeling) technology with an ultra-high resolution LCD panel bringing the cost down.

This 3D printer has dimensions of 8 inch x 8 inch x 16 inch (20 cm x 20 cm x 40 cm) and  it weighs only 15 pounds (6.67 Kg), thus the Bean fits well in any office, studio and workshop environment. Bean can print at 50 micron XY resolution (capable of 10 microns Z layer thickness) with a maximum printing area of 2.7 inch x 4.7 inch (12.1 cm x 6.8 cm) and a build height of 5.9 inch (15 cm).
Jewelry printed by Bean

What is special about this 3D printer?

“Instead of using laser or DLP to generate patterns, the Bean has a high resolution 2K LCD panel coupled with a purple 405nm LED lamp to project slices of a 3D model onto the floor of resin container. The average power consumption of the Bean is only 50W which is one of the lowest.”
They developed a special 3DSR high resolution resins and have thoroughly formulated them for different applications.
You can get your own Bean now from the outstanding Kickstarter campaign for $399 including a 250mL bottle of resin, a resin container and a starter kit.
The campaign still has 29 days to go and it has already achieved 883% of its funds! Check out the campaign video here.

Carbon Introduces SpeedCell System & Bigger 3D Printers

Since 2013, the additive manufacturing startup Carbon had altered the 3D printing industry. Carbon produced its industry-changing M1 3D printer and CLIP 3D printing technology, bringing never-before-seen printing speed and end-use-quality polymer parts to the market.

Today Carbon is on a mission to help manufacturers and designers cut their costs, waste less energy and materials while speeding up the time it takes to get from concept to product on the market. The company released its ‘SpeedCell’ system, a new service aimed at contract manufacturers, and other high volume manufacturing businesses.

SpeedCell is a system of securely connected products designed to upend traditional methods of manufacturing. The first components of the SpeedCell include two new products that provide a powerful solution for additive manufacturing at scale: The M2 3D printer, and the Smart Part Washer.

The Carbon M2, with a build volume of 190 x 118 x 326 mm, is twice the size of the M1,  and it enables the printing of larger parts or more parts per build with the same 75 µm resolution and isotropic quality as Carbon’s pioneering M1 printer.

The Smart Part Washer is a novel machine that automatically cleans parts in a fast, repeatable, environmentally friendly and part-specific manner.

The SpeedCell was developed as a response to the needs of Carbon’s customers and strategic partners, including BMW Group and General Electric. Fast Radius, in partnership with UPS, are new Carbon customers and are among Carbon’s SpeedCell launch partners. Additional launch partners include Dinsmore and Associates, Sculpteo, Primary Manufacturing, and The Technology House.

SpeedCell is offered in two configurations:

  • Design SpeedCell: couples one M Series printer with a Smart Part Washer, allowing product designers and engineers to iterate on product concepts with the confidence that their product can be turned into real parts at any volume.
  • Production SpeedCell: specifically designed for industrial manufacturing applications, pairs multiple production floor compatible M2 printers with a Smart Part Washer.

For our customers, this means that their product development cycles no longer need to include the antiquated traditional manufacturing process steps of designing, prototyping, tooling, and then production. Instead, products can be designed and engineered on a platform that is also the means of production, eliminating prototyping and tooling steps. This dis-intermediation is at the core of Carbon’s role in accelerating the much-anticipated digital revolution in manufacturing.

~ Said Dr. Joseph DeSimone, co-founder and CEO of Carbon.

According to Carbon, the combination of CLIP technology and the SpeedCell system allows for the production of previously impossible designs, such as complex assemblies combined into a single part, or lattices that can’t be produced by milling or molding. It also minimizes the tooling and prototyping stages of the design process and enables manufacturers to go directly to end-stage production.

SpeedCell is being marketed with the same subscription model that Carbon used for the M1, with prices as following for 3 years minimum term:

  • M1: $40,000 per year
  • M2: $50,000 per year
  • Smart Part Washer: $10,000 per year
  • SpeedCell Bundle (available until the end of 2017): Includes a free Smart Part Washer with three or more M Series printers

Carbon displayedthe SpeedCell at the Additive Manufacturing Users Group (AMUG) conference that took place in Chicago from March 19 to 23.

For further information, visit the official blog of launching the SpeedCell. You can also view an interview with Dr. Joseph DeSimone, co-founder and CEO of Carbon, about the new system at 3dprint.com.

Accessible Microfluidics Devices With Ultimaker

Researchers at Cardiff University use 3D printing to create small devices that move small volumes of fluid and are used in various areas of research. 3D printing makes it possible to share the devices with other researchers, making the study of microfluidics more accessible to a wider audience. The 3D printed devices offer a cost-effective alternative to the traditional ones, which are expensive and require specialized skills and equipment. As technology advances and more materials become available, the application of 3D printing in microfluidics research continues to grow.

Microfluidics research

Microfluidic devices are small-scale circuits that are used to study the behavior of fluids in small volumes. The devices consist of small tubes that deliver small volumes of fluid to different sensors and other actuators in the circuit. Conceptually, they can be compared to plumbing systems that are reduced in size, onto a chip. The techniques used to create these microfluidic devices largely coincide with techniques used in the microelectronics industry to make the electronic chips in our computers and phones.

Microfluidic devices are used to make, for example, artificial cells for pharmaceuticals development, nuclear fusion targets for fusion energy production, and alginate capsules with neuronal stem cells inside to transplant into people with damaged spinal cords.

Traditionally, making these microfluidic devices was an expensive, lengthy and sophisticated process, requiring different types of expertise and using specialized equipment. The adoption of 3D printing significantly sped up this process, made it a lot cheaper, and allowed for the devices to be made on the spot in the research lab.

Microfluidics research studies the behavior of small volumes of fluid – Source: Ultimaker

3D printing microfluidic devices

Using their Ultimakers, researchers at Cardiff University now 3D print the microfluidic devices they use in their studies. The 3D printed devices are based on a modular system that consists of standard building blocks that are assembled together. Starting off with a number of standard components (tubings, junctions, etc.), the research team developed different types of microfluidic systems and used those designs to make a modular system that any other researcher can use to make their own microfluidic devices.

3D printing gives rise to significant cost savings over the traditional methods and allows for rapid iterations on the design of the microfluidic devices. Since the designs can easily be shared with researchers in different locations, microfluidics research becomes accessible to other researchers as well. As David Barrow, Research Professor at Cardiff University, explains:

The simple purchase of a 3D printer means that as long as one is able to draw out an object in a suitable file format, using a wide range of available software tools, it is a relatively easy thing to print the object, and indeed make many revisions, relatively rapidly.
Alex Morgan, Research Associate at Cardiff University, points out that other researchers previously discounted the use of 3D printing to create microfluidic devices as they were non-transparent and often leaked. By optimizing the print settings, however, Alex found that by printing in 50-micron layers and at a print speed of 30mm a minute, devices can be printed that are both transparent and water-tight. The research group’s recent publication explains how to do this.
After printing, the different parts of the microfluidic device are assembled – Source: Ultimaker

3D printing in research

3D printing makes it possible to share the designs of microfluidic devices with other researchers so that they can print them out in their own lab, perform their tests and report back the results. In this way, microfluidics becomes accessible for other researchers that otherwise may not be using it.

As the 3D printing industry evolves, applications of 3D printing in research continue to grow. As Oliver Castell, Group leader for Membrane Biophysics and Engineering explains, as the diversity of available materials increases and the precision of the machines improves, it becomes possible to incorporate not only microfluidics but also optical and electronic components in one device. This will yield multi-functional devices made from different materials.

The role of 3D printing in research is expanding with these technological advancements. Take a look at Ultimaker’s explore pages for more applications of 3D printing in research.

Source: Ultimaker

Meet Wembi – The World’s First, Closed Loop Conversion Kit for 3D Printer

wembi-mockup

The future of 3D printing is here and it has a name – Wembi. Boasting an advanced PID compensation system that detects issues while your 3D printer or other CNC based machine is moving, Wembi readjusts itself to eliminate printing problems and help you get the perfect prints fast!

Think of Wembi like a unique vitamin kit for your 3D printer that can boost its performance and take 3D printing to a whole new level.

A Sophisticated System That Revolutionizes DC Motor Control

Being faced with inadequate Open Loop and low precision printing in standard stepper motor technology, we decided to create a brand new, sophisticated controller that could achieve an unbeatable degree of accuracy. And we made it:

A Quantum Leap In 3D Printing Technology

By developing a revolutionary firmware and embedding it into a very simple hardware, we managed to tackle the problem of low accuracy levels and achieve unparalleled accuracy in 3D printing, unlike anything the world has ever seen so far. With important advantages over standard stepper motor technology, Wembi offers outstanding benefits.

Meet Wembi – The World’s First, Closed Loop Conversion Kit for 3D Printer – [Link]

shred-Buddy3D Recycler – Multi Material pelletizer & Cutter

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Recycle Plastic Materials like a few meter leftover 3D Printer material or even Plastic Bottles into Pellets to create new Objects.

Do you own a 3D printer like most Maker and DIY’ler? 

almost run out of filament? … Again? What to do with the last few meters?

well… Make Pellets/Granules of it and use these to create new Filament with an Filament Extruder or an DIY Pellet extruder.

shred-Buddy3D Recycler – Multi Material pelletizer & Cutter – [Link]