Tag Archives: analog

Accelerometers for vibration measurements & wireless condition monitoring

Graham Prophet @ eedesignnewseurope.com discuss about two new MEMS accelerometers from Analog Devices:

Analog Devices (ADI) has added two devices to its low noise, low drift, low power, three-axis MEMS accelerometers. The low noise performance over high frequencies provided by the ADXL356 and ADXL357 MEMS accelerometers delivers high resolution vibration measurements that enable the early detection of machine failure in condition monitoring applications.

Accelerometers for vibration measurements & wireless condition monitoring – [Link]

Pease on Analog Volume 2 is a free download

via elektormagazine.com:

New in the Electronics Design Library is Volume 2 of FOCUS ON: Bob Pease on Analog. With very few exceptions Bob Pease is remembered fondly all over the globe for his analog design expertise as well as his sense of humor. Our esteemed competitors Electronics Design (magazine) shared and spread his wit and knowledge with the electronics community for years with his special column “Pease Porridge.”

Pease on Analog Volume 2 is a free download – [Link]

An isolated analog output for Arduino Uno

isolatedanalogout

Giovanni Carrera discuss how to achieve an isolated analog output on Arduino. He writes:

This project completes the series of my articles about the Arduino analog I/O with the aim to use it as a controller of small automation systems.
In control systems of the industrial plants it is always advisable to isolate both the inputs and the outputs coming from the field. This prevents disturbances caused by power surges, lightning strikes or other EMI sources and also by ground potential differences.
Arduino Uno, or systems based on the ATmega328 chip has no a true analog output, but it may be realized using a PWM output averaged with a low-pass filter.

An isolated analog output for Arduino Uno – [Link]

An isolated analog input for Arduino

VF1 isolated converter

Giovanni Carrera designed a circuit that accepts input voltage from about 20mV to 5V or a current of 4 to 20 mA and converts it to a isolated frequency signal.

A voltage to frequency converter can realize an opto-isolated analog input for Arduino or other microcontroller systems. This circuit is particularly suitable for industrial control plants with 4-20mA sensors.

An isolated analog input for Arduino – [Link]

How-to use PWM to Generate Analog Voltage in Digital Circuits

PWM_period_0

Maurizio @ emcelettronica.com tipped us with his latest article on how to generate analog voltages using a microcontroller.

Many times, designers are faced with the need of generating analogue or analog voltage levels in purely digital circuits. Although the market provides today a very broad range of dedicated digital-to-analogue converters, putting such a device in the schematic has a negative impact on the overall cost of the system.

How-to use PWM to Generate Analog Voltage in Digital Circuits – [Link]

Generating Analog Voltage with Digital Circuit

Fig0012

Maurizio show us how to generate an analog voltage using a microcontroller and some resistors.

The purpose of this article is how to generate analog voltage with digital circuit. Although the market provides today a very broad range of dedicated digital-to-analogue converters, putting such a device in the schematic has a negative impact on the overall cost of the system. There are however, cheap methods of creating the required voltage levels, and even of generating pseudo-analogue signals, using purely digital means.

Generating Analog Voltage with Digital Circuit – [Link]

Generating PWM Signals

In this video “KF5OBS” showing us how to generate a PWM signal that’s behaving proportionally to analog control signal.

Generating PWM Signals – [Link]

Analog Devices AD587KN 10V reference chip

10vref_ad587-1

SteelCity Electronics published an article about Analog Devices AD587KN 10V reference:

I recently got hold of an Analog Devices AD587KN high precision 10.000V reference chip.
This model of chip has an output value of 10.000V ± 5mV (that is, an output value of 9.995V to 10.005V) straight out of the factory. A voltage drift of 10ppm/°C at 25°C meaning that the output voltage will drift by 10μV for each 1°C the chip is exposed to. Additionally, the chip has a voltage trim input, so if you have access to a precision voltmeter, the chip’s output value can be adjusted even closer to 10.000V.
Alternatively, the chip’s output can be trimmed to a value of 10.24V. You may think that a value of 10.24V seems like a strangely familiar number. A value of 1024 is the decimal representation of 10bits, that is 2∧10 = 1024. Why would I want a voltage reference that outputs a value of 10.24V? Because it makes any ADC or DAC conversions much simpler.

Analog Devices AD587KN 10V reference chip  – [Link]