Tag Archives: Android

ICNexus’s SBC3100 Runs Linux On Rockchip RK3399 SoC

Taiwan-based ICNexus’ latest entry with Rockchip RK3399 SoC, SBC3100 joins the growing list of high-end SBCs. It features the high-end SoC to provide an extensive feature list. However, it is not publicly priced and appears to be a proprietary product, such as Aaeon’s Pico-ITX based RICO-3399.

ICNexus SBC3100
ICNexus SBC3100

ICNexus announced the SBC3100 back in 2017, the SBC3100 was showcased at last week’s Computex show in Taipei. The board ships with Ubuntu and Android images, and is designed for applications including digital signage, POS, gaming, STBs, kiosks and other smart devices.

Despite the high-end features, not much stands out from the other equally powerful RK3399 contender SBCs, except for its wide-range 9-36V DC input and its optional add-on modules. The board can be equipped with an HDMI input, an LVDS touchscreen interface, and a 4-port serial add-on.

The board comes with up to 4GB DDR3 and 16GB flash (presumably eMMC). Media ports accommodate HDMI 2.0, eDP, and DP (via USB Type-C). There are up to 2x MIPI-DSI or -CSI, but not 2x of both, and there’s also a separate camera port and I2C touch interface. There’s a GbE port plus optional WiFi/BT module, and the mini-PCIe slot (with micro-SIM) supports optional 3G or 4G modules.

The SBC3100 provides 4x USB ports, 2x of them are 3.0, plus the Type-C port and additional USB headers. Other features include GPIO, serial debug, IR, I2C, and optional sensors.

Specifications list for the SBC3100:

  • Processor:
    • Rockchip RK3399 (2x Cortex-A72 at up to 2.0GHz, 4x Cortex-A53);
    • Mali-T860 GPU
  • Memory :
    • 1GB, 2GB, or 4GB DDR3 RAM
    • 8GB or 16GB flash
    • MicroSD slot
  • Display/camera:
    • HDMI 2.0 out port at up to 4Kx2K@60fps
    • DisplayPort 1.2 at up to 4Kx2K@60fps (via USB Type-C)
    • eDP 1.3 at up to 2560×1600@60fps
    • 1x or 2x MIPI-DSI at up to 2560×1600 at 60fps with optional MIPI/LVDS touchscreen module
    • 1x or 2x MIPI-CSI with optional HDMI input module
    • Camera port
    • An i2c-based capacitive touch interface
  • Audio: mic/earphone connector; 2x speaker connectors
  • Wireless:
    • Optional 802.11b/g/n and Bluetooth 4.0
    • Optional 3G or LTE modules for mini-PCIe slot
    • Micro-SIM card slot
  • Networking: Gigabit Ethernet port
  • Other I/O:
    • 4x USB 3.0 host (2x ports, 2x headers)
    • 3x USB 2.0 host (2x ports, 1x header)
    • USB 3.0 Type-C port with DP support
    • Serial console debug
    • Optional serial module with 4x RS232/422/485 DB9 ports
    • 8-bit GPIO
    • I2C master
    • Keypad interface
  • Expansion: Mini-PCIe slot with 3G/LTE support
  • Other features: IR receiver; buzzer; heatsink; optional 3-axis accelerometer; optional gyro/G-Sensor (only on 4GB RAM model)
  • Power: 9-36V DC input; 3/5/12V DC output; power and reset buttons
  • Dimensions:150 x 102 x 2.6mm
  • OS Support: Pre-installed Ubuntu or Android

No pricing information is provided for the SBC3100, but it appears to be available. More information may be found on the ICNexus SBC3100 product page.

Firefly’s Latest Core-PX3-SEJ COM Runs Ubuntu or Android

Firefly has launched a new SODIMM-style, 67.6 x 40mm Core-PX3-SEJ module that runs Android 5.1 or Ubuntu 15.04 on a Rockchip PX3-SE. It’s a new 1.3GHz, quad-core, Cortex-A7 SoC. The 40 USD module is available in a 1GB RAM/8GB eMMC configuration on a $120, 117 x 85mm Firefly-PX3-SE development board. Other memory configurations may also be available soon.

Firefly Core-PX3-SEJ module
Firefly Core-PX3-SEJ module

The PX3-SE SoC gives the module a sandwich-style dev board and increases the operating temperature to -20 to 80 range. The Core-PX3-SEJ module is praised for its anti-corrosion gold finger expansion connector, and the dev board for its “double stud fixed” design.

Rockchip’s PX3-SE SoC was announced in May 2017. The main target of this SoC is Linux and Android-driven “mobile vehicle interconnect solutions.” The quad-A7 SoC implements a Mali-400 GPU and supports HD video.

The Firefly-PX3-SE board’s 2.4GHz WiFi and Bluetooth 4.0 are supplied separately from the compact Core-PX3-SEJ COM. Despite the lack of 4K support, there are a numerous media interfaces, including a variety of audio features. There are HDMI, CVBS, MIPI-DSI or LVDS, and a DVP camera interface. Analog, SPDIF, and I2S audio connections are available along with an onboard mic and a “phone” I/O port.

The Firefly-PX3-SE board is further provided with a GbE port, 4x USB 2.0 host ports, a micro-USB OTG port, and an 84-pin expansion header. RTC, debug, and IR are also onboard.

Specifications summary for the Firefly-PX3-SE development board with Core-PX3-SEJ module:

  • Processor : Rockchip PX3-SE (4x Cortex-A7 cores @ 1.3GHz); Mali-400 MP2 GPU
  • Memory:
    • 256MB, 512MB, 1GB, or 2GB DDR3 RAM (via Core-PX3-SEJ)
    • 4GB to 64GB eMMC flash (via Core-PX3-SEJ) with 4GB and 8GB default SKUs
    • MicroSD slot
  • Wireless:
    • 2.4GHz 802.11b/g/n with antenna
    • Bluetooth 4.0 with BLE
  • Networking: Gigabit Ethernet port (Realtek RTL8211E)
  • Display & media:
    • HDMI port with audio
    • MIPI-DSI or LVDS LCD interface
    • CVBS with video and audio
    • DVP camera interface for up to 5MP
    • 3.5mm analog audio input jack
    • SPDIF optical output
    • Microphone input
    • I2S audio I/O
    • A phone I/O interface
  • Other I/O:
    • 4x USB 2.0 host ports
    • Micro-USB 2.0 with OTG
    • Serial console debug
    • 84-pin expansion header (MIPI, LVDS, PWM, SPI, UART, ADC, I2C, I2S, GPIO)
  • Other features: RTC with battery; IR receiver; power, reset, recover buttons; acrylic rack kit
  • Power: 5V, 2A (via DC jack); PMU (via Core-PX3-SEJ)
  • Dimensions: 117 x 85mm (with 67.6 x 40mm integrated COM)
  • OS Support: Android 5.1; Ubuntu 15.04; includes Linux Buildroot/Qt

The Core-PX3-SEJ module and Firefly-PX3-SE development board are available for $80 and $140 (including module), respectively, plus shipping. More information may be found at Firefly’s Core-PX3-SEJ and Firefly-PX3-SE shopping pages.

Google Reveals Four New ARM-based production Boards For Android Things 1.0

Earlier this month, Google released Android Things 1.0 and announced many consumer products that will ship in the coming months based on the stripped-down, IoT-oriented Android variant. Google uncovered four ARM-based production boards for Android Things 1.0: Innocomm’s i.MX8M based on WB10-ATIntrinsyc’s Open-Q 212A and Open-Q 624A, based on the Snapdragon 212 and 634, respectively, and the MediaTek MT8516.

The most important news with the first market-ready release of Android Things is that Google is offering free OTA security and patch updates for three years to all targeted devices. However, Google needs a licensing deal to deploy more than 100 commercial systems using the OTA updated long-term version of Android Things, and the OS itself is “managed” and tightly controlled by Google.

The modules share the same small footprints of about a 50 x 50mm. They also focus on audio features that might support integration with the Google Assistant voice agent. The first round of consumer devices using Android Things are smart speakers and automation hubs that integrate Google Assistant.

WB10-AT

InnoComm Google WB10AT COM
InnoComm Google WB10AT COM

InnoComm’s 50 x 50mm WB10-AT COM is almost identical to the WB10 module announced in March. The only difference except for the OS is that the AT version ships with 1GB LPDDR4 instead of 2GB. The WB10-AT includes a 1.5GHzCortex-A53 based NXP i.MX8M Quad SoC with a 266MHz Cortex-M4 core. It extends 8GB eMMC, 802.11ac, Bluetooth 4.2, and a GbE controller.

The WB10-AT allows HDMI 2.0 with 4K HDR support, as well as extensive audio I/O enabled by the audio-savvy i.MX8M. Audio specs include 4x SAI, DSD512, and S/PDIF.

Open-Q 212A Development Kit

Open-Q 212A board and module
Open-Q 212A board and module

Intrinsyc’s Open-Q 212A is a sandwich-style SBC designed for next-gen smart speaker and voice-controlled home hub products. There is a new 50 x 46.5mm Open-Q 212A Android Things SOM with a quad-core, Cortex-A7 Qualcomm Snapdragon 212 (SDA212) — the lowest-end SoC available for Android Things mounted on a 170 x 115mm carrier board.

The new module provides 1GB LPDDR3, 4GB eMMC, WiFi-ac, and BT 4.2. The 12V carrier board adds 2x USB host ports, a micro-USB client port, and a micro-USB debug port. It also includes a MIPI-CSI and MIPI-DSI interfaces, with the latter capable of up to 720p LCD displays. PCB antennas are also available.

Open-Q 624A Development Kit

Open-Q 624A
Open-Q 624A

This new sandwich-style kit is Google’s high-end Android Things platform. It connects a new Open-Q 624A Android Things SOM and carrier board, each of which is the same size as their Open-Q 212A counterparts.

The module extends 2GB RAM4GB eMMCWiFi-ac, BT 4.2, and a new, undocumented octa-core Snapdragon 624 SoC based on the existing Snapdragon 625. Like the Snapdragon 625, the 624 provides 8x Cortex-A53 cores at up to 1.8GHz along with an Adreno 506 GPU with support for 4K @ 30fps video. Google calls the Snapdragon 624 the SDA624, and in one place Intrinsyc refers to it as the APQ8053, which is also the name of the Snapdragon 825.

The Open-Q 624A carrier board has a feature set that is very similar to that of the similarly sized Open-Q 212A board. However, it adds a USB 3.0 Type-C port, sensor expansion and haptic output, and an optional GPS receiver, which like the module’s WiFi and Bluetooth, is available with an antenna.

MediaTek MT8516

MediaTek MT8516
MediaTek MT8516

Google refers to the MT8516 as a virtual SoM, as opposed to the other physical modules, and suggests that the module’s capabilities are directly integrated into a reference board designed for high volume applications.

Whatever the form factor, the MT8516 provides a quad-core, 1.3GHz Cortex-A35 processor with 4GB eMMC, WiFi, BT, and RF. The platform is intended for voice assistance and other audio applications and provides 4-channel I2S x2, 8-channel TDM, and 2-channel PDM input for voice input control and connected audio.

The Cortex-A35 cores draw about 33 percent less power per core and occupy 25 percent less silicon area than Cortex-A53. The -A35 design lies at the heart of NXP’s i.MX8X SoC, which is also available in two dual-core models. The i.MX8X is found on Phytec’s phyCore-i.MX 8 module.

More information may be found on this Google Android Things Supported Platforms page, as well as at these four product pages:

New Wireless VAR-SOM-MX6 Adds Supports For i.MX6 QuadPlus SoC

Variscite a leading SOC manufacturer from Israel, has released a new version of its wireless-enabled “VAR-SOM-MX6” module. It adds support for the i.MX6 QuadPlus SoC. Variscite is renovating the old COM once again with a model that adds support for NXP’s QuadPlus. It is going to be a new addition to the i.MX6 Solo, DualLite, Dual, and Quad versions. The module runs Linux 4.9.11 and Android 8.0 (Oreo).

VAR-SOM-MX6 module with QuadPlus support
VAR-SOM-MX6 module with QuadPlus support

The i.MX6 QuadPlus, which is also available on the Wandboard Reload SBCs, iWave’s i.MX6 COMs, and other boards. It has the same, 1.2GHz quad-core CPU as the Quad, but offers an enhanced Vivante GC2000+ GPU with 50 percent elevated graphics performance. The SoC also provides HD-resolution H.264 decode and encode.

The 2018 version of the VAR-SOM-MX6 is identical with the pin configuration as the earlier models. It has up to 4GB DDR3 RAM and data storage of 4GB to 64GB via eMMC and 128MB to 1GB NAND flash. There’s a GbE controller, although with the usual i.MX6 bandwidth limits. The 802.11n WiFi, which is accompanied by Bluetooth 4.1 with BLE, is available with optional 2×2 MIMO.

The 67.8 x 51.7mm module houses dual 24-bit LVDS interfaces with resistive touch, as well as an HDMI and DSI interfaces. The long list of peripherals includes dual CAN, SATA, PCIe, MIPI-CSI, and much more support. The module has a range of -40 to 85°C working temperatures.

VAR-SOM-MX6 eval kits

VAR-SOM-MX6 Development Kit
VAR-SOM-MX6 Development Kit

The $399 VAR-SOM-MX6 Starter Kit includes the carrier board with the VAR-SOM-MX6 module, an antenna, a debug cable, a microSD card, and a carrier board design package. The $499 Development Kit version adds a 12V power supply, an Ethernet cable, and a 7-inch resistive touch panel. The $549 Development Kit Pro advances to a 7-inch capacitive touchscreen.

The VAR-SOM-MX6 module with QuadPlus support is available now starting at $52 per unit in volume. The development kits start at $399. More information may be found in Variscite’s VAR-SOM-MX6 with the QuadPlus announcement and product page.

Run any Windows Software on your Android Mobile Devices

The definitive guide on how to transfer your entire Desktop Work or Entertainment to any Android Smartphone or Tablet

Windows applications are very common for our everyday work and life, so why should we leave them home (or office) on our Windows desktop PCs? What if we could use them on the go, right on our smartphones or tablets? Well, with the modern IT development level this is not the question anymore.

ExaGear Windows Emulator app can solve this issue. This is a virtual machine that allows you to natively run any PC application on any Android mobile device by creating the environment inside the Android operating system and launching the app within this environment. In fact, the overall usability, performance and speed of windows applications stay the same. You literally feel like you are working on your PC.

Run any Windows Software on your Android Mobile Devices – [Link]

Banana Pi BPI-W2 SBC – A Multimedia Router And NAS Board That Runs Android Or Linux

SinoVoip has released Banana Pi BPI-W2 multimedia network and smart NAS router SBC. The BPI-W2 has a faster processor and more advanced features than last year’s Banana Pi BPI-R2. However, the new model has only two Gigabit Ethernet ports instead of four.

This SBC is designed for applications such as high wireless performance, home entertainment, home automation, and many more. The BPI-W2 runs on a Realtek RTD1296 SoC with 4x Cortex-A53 cores clocked at up to 1.5GHz with a high-end Mali-T820 MP3 GPU. By comparison, previous year’s BPI-R2 used a quad-core, Cortex-A7 MediaTek MT7623 with a Mali-450 MP4. SinoVoip confirms full support for Android 6.0CentOSDebian 9Raspbian, and Ubuntu 15.04, and the board is also said to support OpenWrt.

Banana Pi BPI-W2
Banana Pi BPI-W2

The updated I/O support is shown in the BPI-W2’s dual SATA III ports, compared to only one on the single SATA interface found on the MT7623-based BPI-R2 and RTD1295-based devices. The BPI-W2 also has 8-64GB eMMC, a microSD slot, and 2GB of DDR4.

Although limited to dual GbE ports, the board also has a GbE WAN port for router applications. Unlike the R2, there is an HDMI input in addition to the HDMI output, and a mini-DisplayPort has replaced the earlier MIPI-DSI connection. In either case, the output resolution is still limited to HD (1080p) only.

Four USB ports are available, including single USB 3.0 and Type-C ports. There is a 40-pin header that is claimed to support Raspberry Pi 3 add-on boards. Other features involve RTC, IR, debug, audio I/O, and a 12V input.

Like other Banana Pi boards, the BPI-W2 is open source, shipping with schematics and other documentation. The AliExpress and wiki pages list and show PCIe 2.0 and 1.1/SDIO slots on the front as well as a single M.2 slot on the back. Yet the PCIe slots are also tagged as M.2 slots (E-Key), and it’s unclear which slots are capable of what. The PCIe slots are capable to support up to 802.11ac WiFi, and there’s also a SIM card slot.

The Banana Pi BPI-W2 is available now for $93 plus shipping on AliExpress. More information may be found on the BPI-W2 wiki page.

New Mini-ITX Form Factor Open-X 8M Development Kit Is Built Around i.MX8M Module

The Canada based company Intrinsyc has announced the Open-X 8M System on Module (SOM) a month ago. Now Open-X 8M is followed up with a Mini-ITX form factor Open-X 8M Development Kit build. The kit includes a GbE port, dual USB 3.0 ports, M2 expansion, and much more user-friendly features.

Open-X 8M SOM

Intrinsyc Open-X 8M SOM front side
Intrinsyc Open-X 8M SOM front side

The Open-X 8M SOM can run Linux and Android 8.0 on the high-end Quad model of the i.MX8M, the same model used by most of the other i.MX8M boards. The i.MX8M Quad has 4x Cortex-A53 cores, single 266MHz Cortex-M4F, VPU, and Vivante GC7000Lite GPU chips. These CPU cores can be clocked in the range of 1.3GHz to 1.5GHz.

The Open-X 8M SOM comes with 3GB LPDDR4 RAM and 16GB eMMC. It includes a wireless module with 2.4/5.0GHz 802.11a/b/g/n/ac with the support of 2×2 MU-MIMO and Bluetooth 4.1. A Gigabit Ethernet controller is also there for wired connectivity. Visual output is available with the help of the module’s 3x 100-pin connectors. There is also support for HDMI 2.0a for up to 4096 x 2160 at a 60Hz resolution and 4-lane MIPI-DSI for up to 1920 x 1080 at 60Hz. There are also dual 4-lane MIPI-CSI2 camera inputs.

The Open-X 8M SOM is moreover equipped with 2x debug UART, 2x USB 3.0, 4-bit SDIO, JTAG, and PCIe Gen2 additional I/O ports. This 3.3V module has an NXP PF4210 PMIC, and it can operate in 0 to 70°C temperature range.

Open-X 8M Development Kit

Intrinsyc Open-X 8M Development Kit
Intrinsyc Open-X 8M Development Kit

The Open-X 8M SOM is the heart of the new Open-X 8M Development Kit. It has a footprint of 170 x 170mm, which classifies as Mini-ITX form factor. The board has a MIPI-DSI connector and choice for mounting an optional, smartphone-sized Open-X LCD/Touchscreen is available.

The Open-X 8M Development Kit includes USB 3.0 host, USB 3.0 Type-C, and HDMI 2.0a ports, as well as a microSD slot. A GbE port is available as an alternative to the module’s WiFi. There’s also a 3.5mm audio output jack. Dual MIPI-CSI2 connectors support is available for optional camera module attachment.

The Open-X 8M SOM and Open-X 8M Development Kit are available now. Though, pricing information is not available yet. More information may be found at Intrinsyc’s Open-X 8M SOM and Open-X 8M Development Kit product page.

Open-Q 845 HDK Development Board Integrates Snapdragon 845 SoC And Runs Android 8.0

Intrinsyc’s new Open-Q 845 HDK Development Kit has the same Mini-ITX (170 x 170mm) dimensions and sandwich-style design as the Open-Q 835 from the previous year. The main SoC, Snapdragon 845 is integrated into the board topped by a heatsink. This dev board includes a smartphone like 5.7-inch QHD (1440 x 2560) touchscreen controlled via MIPI-DSI, as well as a camera board with dual rear-facing cameras and a front-facing camera.

Open-Q 845 Development Board with optional touchscreen
Open-Q 845 Development Board with optional touchscreen

The Open-Q 845 runs Android 8.0 on the Snapdragon 845 SoC with 6GB LPDDR4x RAM. The Snapdragon 845 SoC is equipped with 4X high-performance Kryo cores (up to 2.80 GHz) and 4X low-power Kryo cores (up to 1.8 GHz) and the graphics processing is handled by the new Qualcomm Adreno 630 GPU. There’s also a microSD slot and a 128GB UFS 2.1 flash drive. Like the Open-Q 835, the board offers Bluetooth 5.0 + BLE along with 2.4/5GHz 2×2 802.11a/b/g/n/ac and the latest WiGig60 802.11ad WiFi with an onboard antenna.

This board is further enhanced with a GNSS daughter card with GPS, GLONASS, COMPASS, and Galileo support and a PCB antenna and SMA connector option. There are mini-PCIe and PCIe slots for further wireless and peripheral expansion.

Video ports include DSI-driven HDMI 1.4 port, USB 3.1 Type-C DisplayPort, and dual 4-lane MIPI-DSI connectors. There are also 3x 4- and 2-lane MIPI-CSI ports on a single 120-pin connector that support dual 16-megapixel or a single 32-megapixel front-facing camera. This kit supports the Snapdragon 845’s capability for 4K @ 60fps, 10-bit HDR video playback and capture using H.264 (AVC) and H.265 (HEVC) compression.

Open-Q 845, front view (with optional touchscreen)
Open-Q 845Development Board front view (with optional touchscreen)

The audio department is handled by Qualcomm audio codec driver. It supports a headset jack and analog audio input and output headers. There are several I/O ports like DP-ready USB 3.1 Type-C, 2X USB 2.0 host ports, and a micro-USB serial port. Other additional features include NFC and sensor expansion headers with I2C, SPI, UART, and GPIO. The dev kit includes a power management function, as well as 12V/3A input from wall adapter and a 3000mAh Li-Ion battery.

Intrinsyc’s Open-Q 845 HDK Development Kit is available for pre-order at $1,079. No shipping date information was published to this date. More information may be found on the Open-Q 845 product page.

Arduino Communication with an Android App via Bluetooth

With the arrival of the IoT and the need for control, devices now need to do more than perform the basic functions for which they are built, they need to be capable of communicating with other devices like a mobile phone among others. There are different communication systems which can be adapted for communication between devices, they include systems like WiFi, RF, Bluetooth among several others. Our focus will be on communication over Bluetooth.

Today we will be building an Arduino based project which communicates with an app running on a smartphone (Android) via Bluetooth.

Arduino Communication with an Android App via Bluetooth – [Link]

Odroid-N1 Features Gigabit Ethernet And Can Run Android 7.1, Ubuntu, Debian

The Rockchip RK3399 has revolutionized the open-spec single-board computer world. Hardkernel’s new Odroid project has made the multi-core SoC RK3399 to firm it’s grip further. Recently Hardkernel released images, specs, and extensive benchmarks on a prototype for its storage-oriented new Odroid-N1 board. The boards can be expected to launch for about $110 in May or June this year.

New Odroid-N! based on Rockchip's RK3399
New Odroid-N1 based on Rockchip’s RK3399

The 90x90x20mm SBC is highlighted for offering dual channel SATA III interfaces and 4GB DDR3-1866 dual-channel RAM. The Odroid-N1 can run Android 7.1, as well as Ubuntu 18.04 or Debian 9 with Linux Kernel 4.4 LTS. This new board can also be open source as its previous flagship Odroid-XU4.

The RK3399 features two Cortex-A72 cores that are clocked at up to 2.0GHz, as well as four Cortex-A53 cores, which are clocked at 1.5GHz. (Some other RK3399 boards have listed 1.42GHz.) This board also includes a high-end ARM Mali-T864 GPU. Hardkernel’s benchmarks have shown the hexa-core RK3399 based Odroid-N1 is running significantly faster on most tests, beating the Odroid-XU4’s octa-core (4x Cortex-A15, 4x -A7).

The Odroid-N1 is equipped with a GbE port, 2x USB 3.0 ports, and 2x USB 2.0 ports, HDMI 2.0 port for up to 4K Video output. There’s also a 40-pin GPIO header. The Power input is mentioned at 12V/2A, although attaching two 3.5inch HDD will require a 12V/4A PSU. As with the other RK3399 boards, there are no hopes of Raspberry Pi add-on compatibility.

The RK3399 has powered many similar SBCs previously. The first major RK3399 SBC was Firefly’s Firefly-RK3399, soon followed by Vamrs’ similarly open source Rockchip RK3399 Sapphire. More recently we’ve seen Shenzhen Xunlong’s Orange Pi RK3399.

The RK3399 is also finding key roles among many commercial boards. We just saw Aaeon take the leap with its OEM-oriented RICO-3399 PICO-ITX SBC. Earlier, Videostrong announced a VS-RD-RK3399 SBC.

ODROID-N1 key features:

  • Rockchip AArch64 RK3399 Hexa-core processor
  • Dual-core ARM Cortex-A72 2Ghz processor and Quad-core ARM Cortex-A53 1.5Ghz processor, big-LITTLE architecture
  • Mali-T860MP4 GPU, support OpenGL ES1.1/2.0/3.0, OpenCL 1.2
  • 4Gbyte DDR3-1866 RAM, Dual channel interface for 64bit data bus width
  • 2 x SATA3 port, native SATA implementation via PCIe-gen2 to SATA3 interface
  • eMMC 5.0 (HS400) Flash storage and a UHS capable micro-SD slot.
  • 2 x USB 3.0 host port
  • 2 x USB 2.0 host port.
  • Gigabit Ethernet port
  • HDMI 2.0 for 4K display
  • 40-Pin GPIO port
  • OS: Ubuntu 18.04 or Debian Stretch with Kernel 4.4 LTS, Android 7.1
  • Size: 90 x 90 x 20 mm approx. (excluding cooler)
  • Power: 12V/2A input (Attaching two 3.5inch HDD requires a 12V/4A PSU)
  • Price: US$110 (To be adjusted based on DRAM market price changes)
  • Mass production schedule: TBD

More information is available in the Odroid-N1 announcement.