Tag Archives: Android

Nanocounter: Frequency Counter with an Android Interface

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Andy published his accurate and open source frequency counter that uses an Android phone as a display. It’s based on a high accuracy temperature compensated crystal oscillator (TCXO) fed into a phase locked loop (PLL) to create a high frequency reference clock. The reference clock along with the input signal is processed by a Xilinx FPGA and a STM32F072 mcu is reading the data.

Here we have a good example of how a requirement for a simple tool spirals out of control and spawns a project that takes months to complete and ends up dwarfing the project that it was originally expected to facilitate. You see, some time ago I was fiddling around with a project, something to do with data logging, probably, I’ve actually forgotten what I was up to.

Nanocounter: Frequency Counter with an Android Interface – [Link]

Arduino DS18B20 Thermometer on iOS or Android

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maroelawerner @ instructables.com has a tutorial on how to display temperature data on an Android or iOS device using Arduino and Blynk app.

In this Instructable I am going to attempt to show you how to put together a little project to use the Blynk app (optainable at http://www.blynk.cc/) to display the temperature remotely on a iOS or Android device.

I came across an posting on my Google+ where somebody required some help with this. It looked interesting, so I decided to have a try myself.

Arduino DS18B20 Thermometer on iOS or Android – [Link]

FUN but REAL: Manually or lying down

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Yes, these are your options when you want to set time relay of 12.51 series from Finder producer.

Italian producer accommodated less active installers that can now set, resp. program time relay also lying down. Of course, something for something – you need to have a computer but luckily it is something that almost any installer has in his pocket – a smartphone supporting NFC. So, how does it work and what needs to be done:
● Select the appropriate moment – it can be even in the middle of the night
● Choose a comfortable bed – empty one would be the best, so you don’t get distracted by anything
● Put on a comfy clothes – even dungarees, but in that case we suggest covering the bed with polythene
● For the first time, you need to be able to connect to wi-fi from the bed so you can easily download free app FINDER Toolbox from the GooglePlay.

Lay comfortably down – the most well-known and used positions are these four:

  • on the back
  • on the belly
  • on the side version L (on the left)
  • on the side version R (on the right)

In case of using a polythene, you can use all four positions also with legs on the pillow

  • The work itself is just a “game on the phone”
  • Start the game FinderToolbox. Set when and for how long you want that thing to be on and save the settings.
  • The most difficult phase of programming is about to get started. Get off the bed, come to the time relay and touch the actual time relay with your smartphone – that’s when the settings will be transferred to relay

Time relay 12.51 looks like an ordinary time relay on a DIN rail with big nice display backlight – blue signs on white background that effectively shows the necessary information.

Relay also allows programming with joystick (thus manually). This mode is for those who cannot relax while working.


FUN but REAL: Manually or lying down – [Link]

Mobilinkd – Highly mobile packet radio

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If you enjoy APRS (the Automatic Packet Reporting System) in US and Canada this device will make your life easier. All you need is the tiny board, your radio and an Android phone.

Introducing the Mobilinkd Bluetooth APRS® TNC. With your radio, your Android phone and this TNC, you have everything you need to get started with APRS — all at a fraction of the cost of a dedicated APRS® radio, and with a better user interface than any APRS® HT on the market.

Mobilinkd – Highly mobile packet radio – [Link]

UP – Intel x5-Z8300 board in a Raspberry Pi2 form factor

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UP, the credit card computer board for makers powered by Intel Quad Core Atom X5-8300 1.84GHz, running Linux, Windows 10, and Android

We haven’t seen anything like that on the market. We saw plenty of cost effective boards, often powered by RISC technology, and industrial solutions with a wide range of standard form factors, performance and technology but with high prices and poor or absent community support. We tried to merge the best of the two worlds, makers and industrial market. Maybe we were asking for too much. Or maybe not. We put the best x86 low power consumption and high performance technology available today in the market into a credit card size board and created a community to support it.
The answer is UP.

UP is a credit card size board which merges the benefits of Raspberry Pi2, the standard “de facto” of makers with the high performance and low power consumption of latest tablet technology : the Intel Cherry Trail Atom Quad Core x5-Z8300 64 bits up to 1.84GHz ( http://ark.intel.com/products/87383/Intel-Atom-x5-Z8300-Processor-2M-Cache-up-to-1_84-GHz ). Thanks to the 14nm technology, the CPU is rated at only 2W SDP.

UP – Intel x5-Z8300 board in a Raspberry Pi2 form factor – [Link]

Open source pocket USB oscilloscope; 30 MHz, multi-platform

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by Graham Prophet @ edn-europe.com:

Running on Apple iPad, Android, Microsoft Windows and Linux, LabNation’s (Antwerp, Belgium) open source USB oscilloscope, SmartScope, is the result of a Kickstarter campaign commenced in 2014 – the project raised 645% of the funding goal within 30 days.

Believed to be the first test equipment designed to run on multiple operating systems and platforms such as smartphones, tablets and PCs, the lightweight SmartScope is powered directly from the host’s USB interface suiting it for many test and measurement applications far from the workbench.

Open source pocket USB oscilloscope; 30 MHz, multi-platform – [Link]