Tag Archives: antenna

Stanford engineer aims to connect the world with ant-sized radios

Stanford engineer aims to connect the world with ant-sized radios.

A Stanford engineering team has built a radio the size of an ant, a device so energy efficient that it gathers all the power it needs from the same electromagnetic waves that carry signals to its receiving antenna – no batteries required.

Designed to compute, execute and relay commands, this tiny wireless chip costs pennies to fabricate – making it cheap enough to become the missing link between the Internet as we know it and the linked-together smart gadgets envisioned in the “Internet of Things.

2J620P antenna – GSM and GPS under one roof

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New antenna 2J620P will provide you a high quality GSM and GPS signal at once, moreover with a very simple assembly.

Tracking of vehicles or goods is still more used what naturally results into a requirement for a suitable antenna. One of them can be the 2J620P. It offers a very simple and elegant solution, as in fact it is “2 in 1

SatNav Antenna Fixes your Position to 1 cm

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A new multi-band satellite antenna developed by Imec in collaboration with Septentrio was announced at the Mobile World Conference held recently in Barcelona, Spain. The antenna is a multi-band design capable of simultaneously receiving GPS, GLONASS, BeiDou and GALILEO satellite signals. The resulting receiver is capable of resolving its location to within 1 cm.

The antenna is paired with Septentrio’s credit card-sized AsteRx-m receiver, a dual frequency GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite Systems) receiver that provides centimetre accuracy while drawing less than 500 mW

SatNav Antenna Fixes your Position to 1 cm – [Link]

Simple Lightning Detector

Application:

Lightning detector that flashes when lightning strikes nearby.

Description:

This circuit picks up and amplifies signals in the 300 kHz range, where lightning makes a lot of noise that can be picked up with a radio.  The antenna and receiver are tuned to 300 kHz, with the receiver’s output connected to an amplifier that drives the lamp flashing circuit, alerting you to lightning in the area.

Use the potentiometer to reduce the sensitivity to noise and still be able to detect lightning strikes.  In addition to lightning, this circuit will also respond to noise from motors inside appliances like refrigerators, washers, and air-conditioners.  Another easy way to affect the sensitivity is to take off the antenna, or lengthen it depending on the conditions.  To get some confirmation while tuning the detector, you can tune an AM radio to the bottom the of the dial as well.

You can use this circuit to track weather, and be prepared for it. The circuit is small enough and can be placed in a project box or waterproof container to use, on a boat for instance.  The lamp can be replaced or even used alongside a buzzer in this circuit to give an audible alert as well, so that constant monitoring of the circuit is not necessary.

Simple Lightning Detector – [Link]

High-quality GSM/3G signal directly to your device

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Multi-band antenna 2J301 offers several properties for which it´s worth to consider its usage in your devices.  

Decent gain, good VSWR values, small dimensions, resistance to outdoor conditions and a simple mount method are probably basic features, which we´d expect from external antennas for the GSM/UMTS, PCS bands. Antenna 2J301M/SMA  from company 2J provides all this but it features yet another positive feature – a good price.

That´s why, if you´re searching for an antenna with good specification for a good price, 2J301M is a good choice. An elegant design from an ABS plastic is suitable for virtually every application and an easy installation is ensured by a magnetic bottom plate together with a 2.5 m long flexible cable (RG174) with the SMA connector.

Detailed description of the 2J301M/SMA antenna can be found in the 2J301 datasheet.  In case of interest, please contact us at info@soselectronic.com.

High-quality GSM/3G signal directly to your device – [Link]

"Antenna on Chip" Manipulates Light at Warp Speed

Researchers at Rice University (USA) have developed a micron-scale spatial light modulator (SLM) similar to those currently used in sensing and imaging devices, but with the potential to run several orders of magnitude faster. Their ‘antenna on a chip’ operates in 3D ‘free space’ instead of the two-dimensional space of conventional semiconductor devices.

A device that looks like a tiny washboard may clean the clocks of current commercial products used to manipulate infrared light.

New research by the Rice University lab of Qianfan Xu has produced a micron-scale spatial light modulator (SLM) like those used in sensing and imaging devices, but with the potential to run orders of magnitude faster. Unlike other devices in two-dimensional semiconducting chips, the Rice chips work in three-dimensional “free space.”

In current optical computing devices, light is confined to two-dimensional circuitry and travels in waveguides from point to point. According to the researchers, 2D systems ignore the massive multiplexing capability of optical systems arising from the fact that multiple light beams can propagate in the same space without affecting each other. [via]

“Antenna on Chip” Manipulates Light at Warp Speed – [Link]

“Antenna on Chip” Manipulates Light at Warp Speed

Researchers at Rice University (USA) have developed a micron-scale spatial light modulator (SLM) similar to those currently used in sensing and imaging devices, but with the potential to run several orders of magnitude faster. Their ‘antenna on a chip’ operates in 3D ‘free space’ instead of the two-dimensional space of conventional semiconductor devices.

A device that looks like a tiny washboard may clean the clocks of current commercial products used to manipulate infrared light.

New research by the Rice University lab of Qianfan Xu has produced a micron-scale spatial light modulator (SLM) like those used in sensing and imaging devices, but with the potential to run orders of magnitude faster. Unlike other devices in two-dimensional semiconducting chips, the Rice chips work in three-dimensional “free space.”

In current optical computing devices, light is confined to two-dimensional circuitry and travels in waveguides from point to point. According to the researchers, 2D systems ignore the massive multiplexing capability of optical systems arising from the fact that multiple light beams can propagate in the same space without affecting each other. [via]

“Antenna on Chip” Manipulates Light at Warp Speed – [Link]

Testing CMA-77-100 antenna with SYM-RFT-77 DCF77 receiver module

SYM-RFT-77 DCF77 module with standard antenna (60x7mm)

Using a better antenna to improve DCF77 reception on long distances

We are in the prototyping phase of building a Nixie clock using 1N-14 Nixie tubes. The clock is designed around a PIC16F886 MCU, 74141N BCD decoder/driver and CNY74 optocouplers using common circuit topology. High DC voltage (+ 180VDC ) is generated using MAX1771 step-up switching regulator, which is quite efficient (if you use appropriate components).

Our clock will have some nice features:

  • Compact design
  • Manual time configuration
  • DCF77 time synchronization
  • Sync success indicator
  • HV shutdown during sync (to reduce noise received by DCF module)
  • Super-capacitor time backup
  • Thermal protection
  • ICSP connector etc.

When clock is complete we will release it as open source-hardware here at Electronics-Lab.com

We decided to use DCF77 signal as time reference for two main reasons, it’s quite easy to receive it and it’s very accurate for the reason that carrier signal is generated from atomic clocks.

But, what about receiving and decoding DCF77 signal?  Continue reading Testing CMA-77-100 antenna with SYM-RFT-77 DCF77 receiver module

Laser cutting makes antennas greener

RFID antennas are traditionally produced by etching, but a new process developed by Walki, a manufacturer of technical laminates, aims to displace etching by laser cutting. The process uses paper as the substrate and eliminates the need for liquid chemicals, making process residue easily recyclable. Laser cutting also accelerates the design to production cycle and allows extremely precise fabrication of circuit board patterns. The finished antenna, consisting of just paper and aluminium, is fully recyclable.

The new technology is dubbed Walki-4E where 4E stands for efficient, exact, ecological and economical and is based on a laminate of aluminium on a paper substrate, with the aluminium foil cut in patterns using a laser. It can be used to produce any type of flexible circuit, ranging from RFID antennas to radiators and flexible displays. The first product to be launched using this technology is Walki-Pantenna, a UHF RFID antenna. [via]

Laser cutting makes antennas greener – [Link]