Tag Archives: Arduino IDE

tinyTILE, An Intel Development Board Based on Intel Curie Module

In the past year, Intel announced the low power development board “tinyTILE” which was built based on Intel Curie Module, offering quick and easy identification of actions and motions, features needed by always-on applications.

tinyTile was designed for use in wearable devices and rapid prototyping. It is a 35 x 26 mm board and has an Intel Curie Module on the top and a flat reverse side. There are 20 general purpose I/O pins (four of them are PWM output pins) operate at 3.3V with a maximum of 20 mA current.

The Intel Curie Module is a low-power compute module featuring the low-power 32-bit Intel Quark microcontroller with 384kB flash memory and 80kB SRAM, low-power integrated DSP sensor hub and pattern matching technology, Bluetooth® Low Energy (BLE), and 6-axis combo sensor with accelerometer and gyroscope.

Intel Curie Module Block Diagram

Features of the tinyTILE include:

  • Intel® Curie™ module dual-core (Intel® Quark* processor core and ARC* core)
  • Bluetooth® low energy, 6-axis combo sensor and pattern matching engine
  • 14 digital input/output pins (four can be used as PWM output pins)
  • Four PWM output pins
  • Six analog input pins
  • Strictly 3.3 V I/Os only
  • 20 mA DC current per I/O pin
  • 196 kB Flash memory
  • 24 kB SRAM
  • 32 MHz clock speed
  • USB connector for serial communication and firmware updates (DFU protocol)
  • 35 mm length and 26 mm width

tinyTILE can be powered using the USB connection or by an external battery, and it is compatible with three development environments:

The board is available for around $40 on element14. All related documents, specifications, BOM, BSP and other needed information are available at the official page.

You can view this project that invades your dog’s privacy with impressive ease while you’re at work!

MalDuino, The Open Source BadUSB

Firmware is a type of software that provides control, monitoring and data manipulation of engineered products and systems. A USB device firmware hack called BadUSB was presented at Black Hat USA 2014 conference, demonstrating how a USB flash drive microcontroller can be reprogrammed to spoof various other device types in order to take control of a computer, ex-filtrate data, or spy on the user. BadUSB is a critical security flaw that can turn any USB device into a cyber threat. Security experts have released the BadUSB code online, giving hackers access to it.

This project on Indiegogo, MalDuino, is an Arduino-powered BadUSB device which has keyboard injection capabilities. Once plugged in, MalDuino acts as a keyboard, typing previous configured commands at superhuman speeds. You could gain a reverse shell, change the desktop wallpaper, anything is possible. MalDuino is targeting penetration testers, hobbyists and pranksters.

Check the campaign video to know more about the project and to see MalDuino in action:

“MalDuino aims to offer the best BadUSB experience. In terms of software, MalDuino is programmed via the arduino IDE using open source libraries. Scripts written in DuckyScript can easily be converted into code the MalDuino can understand”

Ducky Script is the language of the USB Rubber Ducky, and writing the scripts can be done from any common ascii text editor such as Notepad, vi, emacs, nano, gedit, kedit, TextEdit, etc. Each command resides on a new line and may have options follow.

Source: www.gadgetify.com

MalDuino comes in two editions: Elite and Lite. Elite depends on a SD card to save scripts, thus no need to program the board each time you want to change the script running. With DIP switches provided, you can choose which script to run easily.

The second edition is Lite: a smaller one that can be disguised in most of USB flash disk cases. It has an internal memory of 30 kb to store scripts.

Similar to Arduino Leonardo, you can run MalDuino and operate it anywhere a Leaonardo can run. Some issues were reported by Windows 7 users while running the scripts, but these problems are going to be considered and solved. Another issue is the keyboard different layouts, so if you try to run an English script on a computer with a Spanish keyboard, the wrong characters may be pressed. The English/American keyboards are the only guaranteed up till now

The campaign still has 21 days to go and it has already achieved %1800 of its £500 goal! You can pre-order Lite edition for $16 and Elite for $29. Hardware designs and source codes will be available at Github once the project is launched. More detailed information can be reached at the campaign page.

PureModules, IoT Building Blocks

New range of building blocks for IoT development are just out there! Just like LEGO, PUREmodules by Pure Engineering are the building blocks for IoT connected smart sensors where there is no need to solder, using breadboard or wires. It’s all done just by snapping the modules together and writing some lines of code.

original

The modules that are already designed are:

  • COREModule
  • SUPER SENSOR module
  • General Purpose IO modules via I2C Expanders
  • I2C ADC and DAC modules
  • Energy Harvesting Modules
  • Low power chemical Sensors
  • PIN diode Radiation Detector Module
  • I2C thermal camera modules
  • Dual I2C DC motor Module
  • GPS and IMU Module
  • Long Range LoRa RF modules (10+ miles)
  • Li-Ion and other Power modules
  • Ethernet Module
  • Low Power LCD module
  • User IO button and LED modules
  • Multiple Core modules; CC2650, EFM32, ESP32 and more.
  • Adapter modules to other sensor systems such as Grove and LittleBits
  • Adapters to popular platforms such as Arduino and Raspberry Pi.

Only COREmodule and SUPER SENSOR module are live now in the Kickstarter campaign that Pure Engineering has launched, check the campaign video:

COREmodule

The brain of other modules based on nRF52832 SOC. It is compatible with Arduino and a number of other open source frameworks, it has an onboard antenna and able to update its firmware over the air. Also it supports these IoT operating systems: Mynewt, Zephyr, Contiki OS, RIOT-OS, and mbed OS.

puremodules-internet-of-things-building-blocks

SUPER SENSOR module

This multi function sensor can be used in home automation and monitoring, health tracking, and industrial measurement. It contains the following embedded sensors: barometric pressure, humidity, temperature, accelerometer, magnetometer, UVA UVB, RGB, IR, and heart rate pulse oximetry.

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PUREmodules goal is to simplify IoT development for hackers, tinkerers and designers and to propose a new easy way of interaction and control everything through the Internet. More details can be found at the official website and the Kickstarter campaign. You can pre-order a COREmodule and SUPER SENSOR for $59 as an early bird pledge.

Beginner-Friendly Two-Sided Development Board

MikroElektronika, the microcontroller development boards and accessory boards manufacturer, introduced a new development board for beginners and non-experts called Flip & Click.
Flip & Click is a rapid prototyping tool that is an Arduino Due on one side, and four mikroBUS™ sockets on the other side.

The Two Sides Of Flip & Click Board
The Two Sides Of Flip & Click Board

The first side, the blue side, is Arduino Due side, it based on the Atmel ATSAM3x8E ARM® Cortex®-M3 processor which runs at 84 MHz and features 512KB of flash memory and 100KB of SRAM. This side is compatible with Arduino Leonardo shields thanks to its connectors, which makes it easy to expand its functionality and to add more features.

The other side, the white side, is the Click side. It has four mikroBUS sockets marked from A to D and four blue LEDs, also marked from A to D.

Flip & Click On Board Parts
Flip & Click On Board Parts

The mikroBus is a proprietary add-on board interface specification by MikroElektronika (mikroE). It consists of two 8-pin rows that expose I2C, SPI, and serial ports, 5V and 3V3 power supply, an analogue input, a PWM output, and reset & interrupt signals. All these pins, except the power supply ones, can be used as GPIO too. MikroE has developed several hundreds of extension boards for it, many of them have sensors, and there are also GPS, phone and other wireless boards, motor & LED drivers, etc.

Flip & Click board specifications:

  • MCU – Atmel AT91SAM3X8E Cortex M3 micro-controller @ 84 MHz with 512 KB flash, 100 KB SRAM (64+32+4), also used in Arduino Due.
  • Expansions Headers
  • Arduino UNO compatible headers on the top
  • 4x mikroBUS socket on the bottom
  • USB – micro USB port for programming and power
  • Misc – Reset button, LEDs
  • Power Supply – 5V via micro USB port
Flip & Click Software & Hardware
Flip & Click Software & Hardware

Flip & Click can be programed with both Arduino IDE and Python. For Arduino IDE programmers, you need only to plug it in with USB cable, run the IDE and start writing your sketches – it will be recognized as Arduino Due.

For Python lovers, they can use Zerynth Studio and select MikroElektronika Flip & Click from ‘available boards’ after connecting it, then you can start writing your programs.

Flip & Click is available for $39 on its official page where you can also get access to full documentation, resources, and sample projects. Many users have published their reviews about this board and you can find them here and here.

Flip & Click During MakerFaire
Flip & Click During MakerFaire

Atmega32u4 Breakout Board Tutorial

microcontrollers_296-01

adafruit.com has published a new tutorial for their Atmega32u4 breakout board. It discuss on how to use it with AVRdude and how to setup and use it with Arduino IDE.

We like the AVR 8-bit family and were excited to see Atmel upgrade the series with a USB core. Having USB built in allows the chip to act like any USB device. For example, we can program the chip to ‘pretend’ it’s a USB joystick, or a keyboard, or a flash drive! Another nice bonus of having USB built in is that instead of having an FTDI chip or cable (like an Arduino), we can emulate the serial port directly in the chip. This costs some Flash space and RAM space but that’s the trade-off.

Atmega32u4 Breakout Board Tutorial – [Link]