Tag Archives: ATmega328P

AAduino – Arduino Wireless in AA form factor

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Johan wanted to shrink his Arduino based ISM radio node to fit in an AA battery compartment so AAduino was born.

The AAduino is an wireless Arduino clone the size of an AA battery with Keystone battery terminals rotated 180° to act as positive and negative terminals. It is powered by an ATMega328p and is fitted with an RFM69C companion. There is room for two DS18B20 temperature sensors and an indicator LED.

AAduino – Arduino Wireless in AA form factor – [Link]

Temperature Display with NeoPixel Ring Color

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This is an OLED temperature display based on ATmega328p along with a NeoPixel led ring to display different colors depending on temperature.

This is a small temperature display using a OLED with a NeoPixel Ring around it using MQTT on a ESP8266 and sending data to the on board ATmega328p. It will cycle on a timer though environmental data from other nodes in the house. The LEDs represents the temperature based on color to give an idea of the temperature in the home or apartment I also added a PIR to turn off the LEDs when no one is around since this is designed to run off a LiPo battery. The core is running DomotiGA (Home automation core) and Mosquitto (MQTT broker). Part of this project is exploring the ESP8266 and learning MQTT.

Temperature Display with NeoPixel Ring Color – [Link]

Easy Arduino Menus for Rotary Encoders

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SimonM83 has posted a new tutorial on how to implement an Arduino menu using a rotary encoder. The tutorial goes through the hardware setup and sample code is provided.

Rotary encoders with centre-push buttons are cool input hardware for projects, especially if you want to be able to scroll through menus and select options. Hopefully this Instructable will give you the confidence to try a basic menu system out and combine it with a rotary encoder to give a professional feel to your next project!

Easy Arduino Menus for Rotary Encoders – [Link]

Getting Started With the ATMega328P

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Here is a detailed guide on how to get started with ATMega328P microcontroller. The guide goes in details on how to setup it on a breadboard and how to upload your first code on it. and blink a led.

The real benefit of using this microcontroller is that it’s only $4 US, whereas many other micro-controllers are 10X that price. It can also be easily programmed in the universal programming language, C++. The ATMega is also equipped with a decent amount of memory for any project.

Getting Started With the ATMega328P – [Link]

Weather Station Project with ATMEGA328P, DHT22, BMP180, BH1750 and a Nokia 5110 LCD

This is an Arduino powered Weather Station Project that can run on batteries for almost a year! In order to achieve that we use a bare ATMEGA328 chip along with some accurate sensors. We use the DHT22 temperature and humidity sensor, a BMP180 barometric pressure sensor, a BH1750 light intensity sensor and a Nokia 5110 LCD display. We use the low power library in order to greatly reduce the power consumption of the project and we disable the lcd display when it is night.

Weather Station Project with ATMEGA328P, DHT22, BMP180, BH1750 and a Nokia 5110 LCD – [Link]

Home Built Bench Power Supply using ATMEGA328P

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ianjohnston.com has designed a nice power supply based on  ATMEGA328P and Arduino bootloader. The output is dual channel 0-24vdc @ 3A each, with preset constant current and independant voltage/current control.

This isn’t a full design blog but I’ve tried to document/add stuff as I go along, the idea being I’ll put all design documentation (schematic, partslist, Eagle PCB files, wiring diagrams etc) when it’s all finished.

Home Built Bench Power Supply using ATMEGA328P – [Link]

PCB Christmas tree

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Well, Christmas may over but we think you may take a look at this well designed PCB Christmas tree and why not consider building it for the next year.

Since I already have an Arduino, and I felt pretty comfortable with it, I decided to use it to control the LEDs. However a full Arduino is way too bulky for such a thing (also too expensive), so I decided to try my luck with something more integrated: a standalone ATMega328P chip directly soldered on the Christmas tree.

PCB Christmas tree – [Link]

A Tutorial For Launching Your First Balloon

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Here is a nice tutorial about launching you first ballon into space. Also tracking device information is provided. Source is available here:

There are a lot of reasons to put together a weather balloon launch. Its a great project for a STEM /STEAM class, it requires planning, electronics and programming, and teamwork. It has a lot of great classroom applications, giving a tangible demo of aerodynamics, physics, meteorology, geology, and more. Additionally its a great way to get amateur radio into the classroom and get a new generation into this great hobby. Outside of classrooms there is citizen science to be had, gathering your own data of atmospheric conditions or testing devices in space like conditions. And finally there are the amazing photos and videos that can be made only with weather balloons. Above all launching weather balloons is a lot of fun and a great challenge.

A Tutorial For Launching Your First Balloon – [Link]

DIY Capacitance Meter

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electro-labs.com published another great project based on Atmega328P:

We are building another opensource SoloPCB project which is very enjoyable to build and use. In our electronics works, we frequently need to know the actual value of a capacitor. As you know, small sized SMD capacitors have no markings showing their values. Or there are lots of fake electrolytic capacitors which are rated much lower than their stated values. Sometimes the capacitors have large tolerances and we want to choose the best fit for our circuit. What we need is an accurate capacitance meter.

This is a capacitance meter which can measure capacitors rated from picofarads to millifarads. The principle of operation is simple. Just apply voltage to the capacitor and measure the elapsed time to charge it. The circuit is based on Atmega328P and it is Arduino IDE compatible. It includes the voltage regulators which output 5V and 3.3V from 9V input. A Nokia 5110 LCD is used to display the measured information. Thanks to the 4mm banana jacks, various kinds of probes can be used such as SMD probe, crocodile probe etc.

DIY Capacitance Meter – [Link]