Tag Archives: ATmega328P

Immediately available TFT modules with capacitive touch panels

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Simply applicable graphic platform FTDI EVE simplifies development thanks to immediately-usable display modules with capacitive touch panels.

FTDI „Embedded Video Engine“ (EVE) platform may be familiar to you from our article like „Be in plus with a graphic platform FTDI VM800P “.

FT800, as a powerful graphic platform with minimum requirements for a host MCU will meet your requirements with a high probability. Into the final application, you´ll probably use only the “heart of the system” itself – chip FT800 (supporting resistive touch panels) or chip FT801 (supporting capacitive panels) but for the beginning it´s certainly a good idea to start with a suitable module, which only needs to be switched-on and it´s possible to start writing and evaluating a SW application.

Thanks to ready-made modules series VM801 nothing prevents you from trying this platform in your application.. VM801 series modules are available in 2 variants:

  • VM801B – „basic“ module with the FT801 chip, display and accessory circuits. It is a basic module for evaluation of applications. Its main benefit is that you don´t need to design a PCB but you have a well-tried functional unit with a display and also a precise bezel.
  • VM801P – „plus“ module with the FT801 and the AtMEGA328P/16MHz microcontroller. A powerful module capable of a standalone operation, also supporting Arduino libraries.

Further, VM801 are available with 4,3“ as well as 5“ displays (480×272 px), both with capacitive touch panel. Modules VM801 are suitable for development, but also for a small-series production, when it´s simpler and cheaper to use such a module than to develop all the hardware portion. Detailed description can be found in the VM801B and VM801P datasheets.

Immediately available TFT modules with capacitive touch panels – [Link]

Arduino Digital Magnetic Compass – HMC5883L

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by mi.vasilakis @ instructables.com:

Today I will show you how to make your own arduino compass by using the MHC5883L 3-axis digital compass board.

I prefer to build my own arduino based circuit by using the ATmega328p uno possessor, but this is optional for you. Buttons are used for turn on or off display leds and to change display mode of compass.

Arduino Digital Magnetic Compass – HMC5883L – [Link]

Piconomic FW Library 0.4.2 released

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by Pieter @ piconomic.co.za:

If you can beg, steal or borrow an Atmel ISP programmer, then you can use the Arduino environment to develop on the Atmel AVR Atmega328P Scorpion Board. An Arduino on Scorpion Board guide, Optiboot bootloader and example sketches have been added.

If you own an Arduino Uno board, you can now try out the Piconomic FW Library risk free without abandoning the creature comforts of the Arduino environment. You can use the existing Optiboot bootloader to upload code. I have added a getting started guide for the Arduino Uno. There are examples, including a CLI (Command Line Interpreter) Application that creates a “Linux Shell”-like environment running on the Arduino Uno so that you can experiment with GPIO, ADC, I2C and SPI using only Terminal software (for example Tera Term)… it is really cool!

Piconomic FW Library 0.4.2 released – [Link]

Atmel ATmega328P Scorpion Board

 

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This minimalistic board is packed with features and comes with an extensive ecosystem of documentation and firmware.

For the student (we are never too old) that wants to fast track his career as a professional firmware developer there is:

  • a detailed getting started guide
  • an Atmel AVR quick start guide, with tutorials and examples
  • Recommend best practices

For the developer that wants to improve his game there is:

  • A header to quickly connect different kinds of peripherals (GPIO, A/D, UART, SPI & I2C). Notice that each interface has it’s own +3V3 and GND pins to make wiring easier and also improves EMC.
  • A full-featured CLI application to experiment with the connected device and verify that it works, before committing to a single line of C code.
  • A firmware framework that lays the foundation so that you can quickly develop a new application.
  • A Temp&Pressure Logger and Analog voltage Logger application that demonstrates how you can quickly develop your own custom logging application using the onboard AT45D DataFlash.

Atmel ATmega328P Scorpion Board – [Link]

Adventures in Moteino: Remote temperature monitor

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Colin over at CuPID Controls writes:

We want to put our remote sense and control modules out into the wild and read and aggregate them as it makes sense.
Our basic system layout is as below. We’ve got multiple wireless nodes that broadcast data periodically, and a controller/aggregator that will log this data, acknowledge receipt, and do something useful with it. Eventually, we may have intermediate powered nodes that serve to mesh the grid out, but for now, our nodes just send data to the controller.
We’re currently using these awesome little RF units, called Moteinos. They are an Arduino clone that can use the standard IDE with their bootloader. They’ve got the ever-so-popular ATMega328P chip that is familiar to anybody working with an Arduino Nano or Uno.

[via]

Adventures in Moteino: Remote temperature monitor – [Link]

On Arduino due PWM frequency

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Kerry D. Wong writes:

I just got myself a couple of Arduino Due boards. While they were released almost two years ago, I have not really got a chance to look at these until quite recently. Arduino Due is based on Atmel’s ATSAM3x8E 32-bit ARM Cortext-M3 processor. The processor core runs at 84 MHz, which is significantly faster than its 8-bit AVR counterpart ATmega328p which runs at 16 MHz. For an ATmega328p, the highest achievable PWM frequency is 8Mhz (square wave), so we should be able to generate much higher frequency signals on an Arduino Due. But how high can we go? Let’s find out.

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On Arduino due PWM frequency – [Link]

A DIY laser engraver build using DVD and CD-ROM/writer

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Here’s a DIY 38mm x 38mm laser engraver build using CD-ROM/writer on ATmega328p by Davide Gironi:

A laser engraving machine, is a tool that uses lasers to engrave an object.
To build this tool I’ve used two old CD-ROM writer that lays around in my garage.
The X/Y positioning system it is build using the CD-ROM motor assembly. For the engraving laser i use the CD-ROM writer laser.
With this hardware the engraving area are will be almost 38mm x 38mm.

[via]

A DIY laser engraver build using DVD and CD-ROM/writer – [Link]

Be in plus with a graphic platform FTDI VM800P

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“Plus” version of new graphic modules FTDI with an EVE technology brings a big plus in a form of a compatibility with an Arduino platform. 

Innovative graphic chips of the family EVE were introduced to you in our article: Is a display design difficult? Leave it to „Eve“! or also in the webinar in cooperation with the producer – FTDI. This time company FTDI comes with another significant step to make development easier – compatibility with an Arduino platform.
New versions of VM800 modules with the „P“ (Plus) suffix contain besides the graphic chip FT800 and a touch display (3,5/4,3 a 5,0“) a RISC procesor ATMEGA328P (16 MHz) with a precompiled Arduino „bootloader“ (from the supplied 4GB uSD card). It means, that applications can be developed in a free Arduino IDE environment and to use a huge amount of Arduino libraries. “Plus

Embedded Video Engine for Arduino

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This week FTDI Chip have announced a range of Arduino-compatible development platforms to support the company’s Embedded Video Engine (EVE) technology. The VM800P series provides engineers with everything necessary to implement Human Machine Interfaces (HMIs) featuring display, audio, touch elements and data processing aspects too.

The units can be programmed using the standard Arduino IDE (using a pre-programmed Arduino-compatible bootloader). In addition to support for various Arduino libraries, every VM800P incorporates an FTDI Chip FT800 EVE graphic controller IC and its FT232R USB interface IC as well as an ATMega328P 8-bit microcontroller running at 16 MHz. Also featured are a touch-enabled display LCD panel, a backlight LED driver, an audio power amplifier and a micro speaker. A choice of 3.5, 4.3 and 5.0-inch display formats is available which have precision fitted bezels to enable operation in industrial environments. The VM800P units also have a USB serial port for firmware upload and application communication, a battery-backed real time clock (RTC) for carrying out system timing and a micro SD socket loaded with a 4GByte SD card containing sample applications. [via]

Embedded Video Engine for Arduino – [Link]