Tag Archives: ATmega328P

A Tutorial For Launching Your First Balloon


Here is a nice tutorial about launching you first ballon into space. Also tracking device information is provided. Source is available here:

There are a lot of reasons to put together a weather balloon launch. Its a great project for a STEM /STEAM class, it requires planning, electronics and programming, and teamwork. It has a lot of great classroom applications, giving a tangible demo of aerodynamics, physics, meteorology, geology, and more. Additionally its a great way to get amateur radio into the classroom and get a new generation into this great hobby. Outside of classrooms there is citizen science to be had, gathering your own data of atmospheric conditions or testing devices in space like conditions. And finally there are the amazing photos and videos that can be made only with weather balloons. Above all launching weather balloons is a lot of fun and a great challenge.

A Tutorial For Launching Your First Balloon – [Link]

DIY Capacitance Meter


electro-labs.com published another great project based on Atmega328P:

We are building another opensource SoloPCB project which is very enjoyable to build and use. In our electronics works, we frequently need to know the actual value of a capacitor. As you know, small sized SMD capacitors have no markings showing their values. Or there are lots of fake electrolytic capacitors which are rated much lower than their stated values. Sometimes the capacitors have large tolerances and we want to choose the best fit for our circuit. What we need is an accurate capacitance meter.

This is a capacitance meter which can measure capacitors rated from picofarads to millifarads. The principle of operation is simple. Just apply voltage to the capacitor and measure the elapsed time to charge it. The circuit is based on Atmega328P and it is Arduino IDE compatible. It includes the voltage regulators which output 5V and 3.3V from 9V input. A Nokia 5110 LCD is used to display the measured information. Thanks to the 4mm banana jacks, various kinds of probes can be used such as SMD probe, crocodile probe etc.

DIY Capacitance Meter – [Link]

Open Inverter, an open source micro-solar inverter


Ken Boak has been working on an open source micro-solar inverter project:

We wanted to make a design that uses readily obtainable N-type FETS and an Arduino (more strictly a ATmega328P-PU on a breadboard) to generate the PWM signals and provide simple circuit protection, and load sensing. With the PWM signals generated in firmware it can easily be modified for 50Hz or 60Hz operation, either 115V or 230V operation and a wide range of battery input voltages.
We imagined that the final design could consist of an Arduino, an “Inverter Shield” containing FETs and driver ICs configued in a H-bridge and some voltage and current monitoring circuits. To make the inverter a 12V or 24V battery (or PV panel) and a 12V (or 24V) torroidal transformer would be added.

Open Inverter, an open source micro-solar inverter – [Link]

Seven Segment Display Arduino Thermometer


by Ardumotive_com @ instructables.com:

Today I will show you how to make your own 7 segment – 2 digit – thermometer with Arduino uno and DS18B20 temperature sensor.

I prefer to build my own arduino based circuit by using the ATmega328p uno possessor, but this is optional for you. You can also use breadboard to build it easier 😉

Seven Segment Display Arduino Thermometer – [Link]

Immediately available TFT modules with capacitive touch panels


Simply applicable graphic platform FTDI EVE simplifies development thanks to immediately-usable display modules with capacitive touch panels.

FTDI „Embedded Video Engine“ (EVE) platform may be familiar to you from our article like „Be in plus with a graphic platform FTDI VM800P “.

FT800, as a powerful graphic platform with minimum requirements for a host MCU will meet your requirements with a high probability. Into the final application, you´ll probably use only the “heart of the system” itself – chip FT800 (supporting resistive touch panels) or chip FT801 (supporting capacitive panels) but for the beginning it´s certainly a good idea to start with a suitable module, which only needs to be switched-on and it´s possible to start writing and evaluating a SW application.

Thanks to ready-made modules series VM801 nothing prevents you from trying this platform in your application.. VM801 series modules are available in 2 variants:

  • VM801B – „basic“ module with the FT801 chip, display and accessory circuits. It is a basic module for evaluation of applications. Its main benefit is that you don´t need to design a PCB but you have a well-tried functional unit with a display and also a precise bezel.
  • VM801P – „plus“ module with the FT801 and the AtMEGA328P/16MHz microcontroller. A powerful module capable of a standalone operation, also supporting Arduino libraries.

Further, VM801 are available with 4,3“ as well as 5“ displays (480×272 px), both with capacitive touch panel. Modules VM801 are suitable for development, but also for a small-series production, when it´s simpler and cheaper to use such a module than to develop all the hardware portion. Detailed description can be found in the VM801B and VM801P datasheets.

Immediately available TFT modules with capacitive touch panels – [Link]

Arduino Digital Magnetic Compass – HMC5883L


by mi.vasilakis @ instructables.com:

Today I will show you how to make your own arduino compass by using the MHC5883L 3-axis digital compass board.

I prefer to build my own arduino based circuit by using the ATmega328p uno possessor, but this is optional for you. Buttons are used for turn on or off display leds and to change display mode of compass.

Arduino Digital Magnetic Compass – HMC5883L – [Link]

Piconomic FW Library 0.4.2 released


by Pieter @ piconomic.co.za:

If you can beg, steal or borrow an Atmel ISP programmer, then you can use the Arduino environment to develop on the Atmel AVR Atmega328P Scorpion Board. An Arduino on Scorpion Board guide, Optiboot bootloader and example sketches have been added.

If you own an Arduino Uno board, you can now try out the Piconomic FW Library risk free without abandoning the creature comforts of the Arduino environment. You can use the existing Optiboot bootloader to upload code. I have added a getting started guide for the Arduino Uno. There are examples, including a CLI (Command Line Interpreter) Application that creates a “Linux Shell”-like environment running on the Arduino Uno so that you can experiment with GPIO, ADC, I2C and SPI using only Terminal software (for example Tera Term)… it is really cool!

Piconomic FW Library 0.4.2 released – [Link]

Atmel ATmega328P Scorpion Board



This minimalistic board is packed with features and comes with an extensive ecosystem of documentation and firmware.

For the student (we are never too old) that wants to fast track his career as a professional firmware developer there is:

  • a detailed getting started guide
  • an Atmel AVR quick start guide, with tutorials and examples
  • Recommend best practices

For the developer that wants to improve his game there is:

  • A header to quickly connect different kinds of peripherals (GPIO, A/D, UART, SPI & I2C). Notice that each interface has it’s own +3V3 and GND pins to make wiring easier and also improves EMC.
  • A full-featured CLI application to experiment with the connected device and verify that it works, before committing to a single line of C code.
  • A firmware framework that lays the foundation so that you can quickly develop a new application.
  • A Temp&Pressure Logger and Analog voltage Logger application that demonstrates how you can quickly develop your own custom logging application using the onboard AT45D DataFlash.

Atmel ATmega328P Scorpion Board – [Link]

Adventures in Moteino: Remote temperature monitor


Colin over at CuPID Controls writes:

We want to put our remote sense and control modules out into the wild and read and aggregate them as it makes sense.
Our basic system layout is as below. We’ve got multiple wireless nodes that broadcast data periodically, and a controller/aggregator that will log this data, acknowledge receipt, and do something useful with it. Eventually, we may have intermediate powered nodes that serve to mesh the grid out, but for now, our nodes just send data to the controller.
We’re currently using these awesome little RF units, called Moteinos. They are an Arduino clone that can use the standard IDE with their bootloader. They’ve got the ever-so-popular ATMega328P chip that is familiar to anybody working with an Arduino Nano or Uno.


Adventures in Moteino: Remote temperature monitor – [Link]