Tag Archives: ATtiny

Capacitance Meter


by ThomasVDD @ instructables.com:

Capacitors are vital components in electronics, but sometimes they are broken, or the value printed on the cap has become unreadable. Because my multi-meter does not have a capacitance measurement, I decided to make one!

The principle of measuring capacitance is quite simple. The voltage of a capacitor charging through a resistor increases with time T. The time it takes to reach a certain voltage, is related to the values of the resistor and capacitor. In this project, we’ll use a 555 timer circuit as a monostable multivibrator. If that sounds like some dark magic to you, don’t worry, it’s quite straightforward. I’ll refer to the the Wikipedia page for the details, as we’ll focus on the things we really need: the schematic and formula. The time in which the capacitor C charges through the resistor R is given by: T = ln(3) x R x C = 1.1 RC. If we know the value of the resistor and the time, we can calculate the capacitance: C = T / 1.1R.

Capacitance Meter – [Link]

Smart Plug with Esp8266, Attiny 85 & PIR Sensor


by Armtronix:

The Wifi Arduino 85 is a small board with ESP8266 -01 module, Attiny85 micro controller and a relay. It Also has and additional header for connecting an external relay or to connect sensors like PIR, IR etc depending on your application. If you are a tinkerer you will also be able to connect a HC-05/06 Bluetooth module and convert this board to a Bluetooth Arduino 85 board.

Smart Plug with Esp8266, Attiny 85 & PIR Sensor – [Link]

Simple and extensible microprocessor driver for robots



I will start from saying that the board could be replaced by any Arduino plus some(s) its motor driver shield(s). So why I made it you may ask? Well, while I made this tiny tank-robot model presented on below pictures, I wanted to make at least some things by myself, and decide what I need and how I need it instead of only buying prefabricated stuff.

Simple and extensible microprocessor driver for robots – [Link]

Getting more I/O pins on ATTiny with Shift Registers


by silentbogo @ instructables.com:

If you previously worked(or currently working) with small 8-bit microcontrollers, like ATTiny or PIC12, you’ve probably encountered a fundamental problem of not having enough GPIO pins for your needs or project requirements.

Upgrading to a larger MCU is only one of the options, but as usual there is an alternative. In this article I will explain how to use shift registers in some common situations in order to expand the I/O capacity of your microcontroller. As an example I will use an ATTiny13A and a 74HC595 shift register.

Getting more I/O pins on ATTiny with Shift Registers – [Link]

Reflow Soldering Controller


by pleasantsoftware.com:

This is reflow soldering controller for use with a toaster oven as reflow soldering oven.

I bought the toaster oven in a local super market for about 40 €. There was also a cheaper oven on sale, but I wasn’t sure if it did 250°C, so I bought the more expensive and prettier one.

Since I don’t want to loose the warranty and also haven’t any interest of the oven’s internals, I designed the reflow controller as an oven-external device which directly switches the oven’s mains on/off.

The relay I use is for 6V, but it seems to work just fine with the 5V supply from the ATtiny. On the mains side, the relay is rated for 230V/16A.

The whole controller is based on a ATtiny 45 µController. I use one pin as input for the 100k thermistor for temperature measurement (connected to JP3), one pin controls the mains relay (via a BC140 transistor), one pin controls a LED for feedback and one pin is connected to a switch for user input.

Reflow Soldering Controller – [Link]

Tiny ATtiny Node


Tiny ATtiny Node with temperature sensor project at Arduino Praxis:

Tiny sensor board with ATtiny84 and RFM12B Transceiver. The size of the PCB is 25 x 30mm, sightly larger than a canadian quarter coin.


Tiny ATtiny Node – [Link]

Breaking out a QFP Attiny88 AVR


Ralph Doncaster writes:

Several months ago I noticed the Attiny88. It has several more I/O than the Atmega328, with an extra Port A and PC7. And unlike most of the other Attiny series, it has real SPI instead of USI, so libraries using SPI don’t have to be re-written. At just 86c for qty 1, it is the also the cheapest AVR with 8KB flash. Since QFP-32 parts aren’t easy to work with, I searched for breakout boards and found QFP32 to DIP32 boards that would allow me to use them in a small breadboard.


Breaking out a QFP Attiny88 AVR – [Link]

p.u.l.s.e. – fader control for Motorcycle parking Lamp


anool @ wyolum.com builds a pulse lamp controller for the parking light of his KTM bike. He writes:

My brother is a Mechanical Engineer who loves his KTM Duke 200 bike. He asked me to build this circuit : http://sunbizhosting.co.uk/~spiral/blog/?p=227 for a ‘heartbeat’ lamp controller for the parking light. A Neutral Detect (ND) signal controls the lamp pulsing. When ND is HIGH, the Lamp is fully lit. When ND goes LOW, the lamp starts pulsing.

I’m not familiar with PIC microcontrollers, and didn’t want to dabble in “C

How-To: Shrinkify Your Arduino Projects

If you have a simple Arduino project that uses only a few pins, you might be able to shrink it down to a single 8-pin ATtiny chip. In this video, Matt Richardson shows you how, based on a tutorial from MIT Media Lab’s High-Low Tech Group. The best part is you can use the same Arduino code and development environment that you’re already used to.

How-To: Shrinkify Your Arduino Projects – [Link]

8-Pin Arduino Programming Shield


randofo @ instructables writes:

The 8-Pin Programming Shield allows you to program ATtiny series chips using the Arduino itself as the programmer. In other words, you plug this into your Arduino and then you can easily program 8-pin chips. These small microcontrollers can then be incorporated into any project that you want. Follows are instructions for assembling your own 8-Piin Programming Shield.

8-Pin Arduino Programming Shield – [Link]