Tag Archives: Bluetooth

Sparkfun: First Impressions of the ESP32

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Jimb0 @ sparkfun.com takes a first look on the new ESP32 WiFi board by Espressif that’s an improvement of the ESP8266 board.

The ESP32 doesn’t replace the ESP8266, but it does improve on it in every aspect. Not only does it have WiFi support, but it also features a Bluetooth 4.2 radio, making it even more versatile. The CPU is similar to the ESP8266 – it’s a 32-bit Xtensa® LX6, but the ESP32 has two cores! There’s also 128KB of ROM and 416KB SRAM, but Flash memory (for program and data storage) is still left up to an external chip (up to 64MB).

Sparkfun: First Impressions of the ESP32 – [Link]

OSHChip – general purpose processor board in DIP format

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OSHChip is a general purpose processor board based on ARM Cortex-M0 32 bit processor running at 16 MHz. It includes 2.4 GHz Bluetooth Low Energy radio and a broad range of built-in Peripherals. It features 256 KBytes of Flash memory for program and data and 32 KBytes of SRAM. All this functionality comes in a tiny DIP like package which is compatible with a breadboard thus making prototyping an easy task. OSHChip is an open source project and all design files are available on github: https://github.com/OSHChip/OSHChip_V1.0_Docs

OSHChip – general purpose processor board in DIP format – [Link]

Fobble – A general purpose Wireless Breakout Board!

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Ken Boak has designed a compact board with RFduino Bluetooth Low Energy Module:

This week I have been working on another of my standard footprint 50mm x 50mm boards – it is a general purpose wireless module carrier board:- Fobble. That’s a BLE Fob – for anyone who misses the pun.

In the last few weeks there have been a number of applications arise – that could easily be addressed with an easy to use, generic wireless platform. These have included keyfob or pendant applications – requiring a small coin cell powered board – to a generic wireless board that can be stacked to one of the processor boards to provide wireless connectivity.

Fobble – A general purpose Wireless Breakout Board! – [Link]

Smart Watch

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Matthew Filipek from Cornell Univercity has build a nice smart watch with 1.7 inch touch screen, SD card, Bluetooth module and various apps.

One of the main inspirations for this project was Jared Sanson’s implementation of a DIY smartwatch (REF 0). With several design iterations, he was able to produce a watch in a very small package that can communicate with a PC via USB HID, features an OLED display, and has support for an accelerometer. As my project was to be completed in the span of a mere month, several of the components I got were purchased for their ease of use rather than their compactness.

Smart Watch – [Link]

PIC32 Bluetooth Starter Kit; DM320018

The DM320018 PIC32 bluetooth starter kit comes with demonstration code that allows it to communicate with smart devices that are bluetooth enabled. It features the PIC32MX270F256D MCU for central processing and the FLC-BTM805 dual-mode Bluetooth HCI module. The kit also contains Cree high output multi-color LED, three standard single color LEDs for display, five push buttons for user defined inputs, integrated 3-axis accelerometer and temperature sensor for applications intended by the user.

The development board in this starter kit has the PIC32MX270F256D microcontroller as its main component. All peripherals found in this development board are attached in the PIC32MX270F256D microcontroller. One of the peripherals is the low cost FLC-BTM805 bluetooth HCI module which allows devices to transmit or receive data from the microcontroller. The bluetooth module supports BT2.1 and later that has an HCI interface. It also supports Enhanced Data Rate (EDR) and can communicate with a data rate up to 3Mbps. Other peripherals just like the switches, LEDs, 3D accelerometer, temperature sensor, etc. are used for application development purposes.

The development board can run in three modes; host mode, device mode, and debugging mode. To operate in host mode, connect the device to the Type-A connector, port J1. To switch into device mode, connect the board to the host through port J2. The starter kit includes a PIC24FJ256GB106 USB microcontroller for debugging over USB. To select this mode, connect the starter kit to port J7. The board in this starter kit can be powered by connecting USB power to port J7 or apply VBUS (+5V) power to the micro-B USB connector found in the board.

PIC32 Bluetooth Starter Kit; DM320018 – [Link]

Mobilinkd – Highly mobile packet radio

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If you enjoy APRS (the Automatic Packet Reporting System) in US and Canada this device will make your life easier. All you need is the tiny board, your radio and an Android phone.

Introducing the Mobilinkd Bluetooth APRS® TNC. With your radio, your Android phone and this TNC, you have everything you need to get started with APRS — all at a fraction of the cost of a dedicated APRS® radio, and with a better user interface than any APRS® HT on the market.

Mobilinkd – Highly mobile packet radio – [Link]

Bluetooth enabled Door locker using Arduino

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Frank Donald @ gadgetronicx.com has build a bluetooth controlled door locker using Arduino. Source code included:

DIY Arduino based lockers can be found plenty in the internet where keypad was used to feed lock input. But this Bluetooth enabled Door locker uses Bluetooth as a medium to connect with the locker and your smart phone to feed input credentials. This locker allows you to lock/unlock your locker without physical touch when you are within the range of Bluetooth communication.

Bluetooth enabled Door locker using Arduino – [Link]

Intel and Banzi presented Arduino 101 and Genuino 101

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by Zoe Romano @ blog.arduino.cc:

Today during Opening Conference at Maker Faire Rome, Josh Walden Senior Vice President of Intel Corporation and Massimo Banzi, co-founder of Arduino, announced the upcoming release of Arduino 101 (U.S.) and Genuino 101 (outside the U.S.). The board features a 32-bit Intel® Quark™ microcontroller for minimal power consumption, 384 kB of flash memory, 80 kB of SRAM (24kB available for sketches), an integrated DSP sensor hub, Bluetooth* Low Energy radio, and 6-axis combo sensor with accelerometer and gyroscope.

We collaborated with Intel to provide the maker community an affordable learning and development board ideal for entry-level makers and education environments and also the first widely available development board based on the tiny, low-power Intel Curie module.

Intel and Banzi presented Arduino 101 and Genuino 101 – [Link]

Digital Hearing Aid using MKL02Z16VFG4

A hearing aid is a small electronic device worn in or behind the ear that amplifies incoming sounds to help people with hearing impairment. This design features a light and compact hearing aid with a soft touch sensor that allows the user to control the volume and frequency depending on the user’s preference.

This design uses MKL02Z16VFG4, an energy and size efficient microcontroller that serves as the main component of the system. It receives the signals from the sensor and microphone, and then sends the processed signal to the speaker. The system uses two amplifiers, a class AB preamplifier and a class D amplifier, both in small packages as it is desirable for the device. It is also equipped with a sensor using Si1102-A-GM that enables the user to change the volume and frequency with a simple touch. Other components can be added, such as a Bluetooth remote control.

This design is applicable for hearing aids and other sound amplification needs. Its lightweight feature makes it portable for daily usage.

Digital Hearing Aid using MKL02Z16VFG4 – [Link]

Tutorial on the Design & Implementation of an FPGA RGB LED Matrix Driver

In this episode Shahriar and Timo demonstrate the design methodology of an FPGA based 32×32 RGB LED matrix driver. Timo has kindly devoted some of his time to describe the block diagram and the thought process which goes into designing this type of FPGA display driver. The various components of the overall system (PLL, UART, and Display Controller) are shown along with the simulation data. The outputs of the Spartan-6 FPGA board are then measured using a Keysight S-Series oscilloscope. The design of the RGB matrix is also demonstrated using a custom clock interface sent wirelessly to the unit via Bluetooth.

Tutorial on the Design & Implementation of an FPGA RGB LED Matrix Driver – [Link]