Tag Archives: Bluetooth

Arduino “Pick N Place” Android Robot

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Sameer tipped us with his latest build of an arduino robot which is controlled by an Android smartphone using Bluetooth.

Pick N Place robot is a basic level robot for beginners and leaders to learn all about the laws & concepts of Physics, Electronics & Mechanics hence it helps one to inherit this knowledge as one is implementing it. It helps you to get a feel of what robotics is all about.

Features:

Arduino programming, Bluetooth Application based Android smartphone control, Wheel with track belt drive, Pick and place operation by gripper, Easy circuit implementation

Arduino “Pick N Place” Android Robot – [Link]

Connecting HC-05 Bluetooth Module to Arduino

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TechDepot Egypt @ instructables.com has published a tutorial on how to connect a HC-05 Bluetooth module to Arduino. Turorial shows how to connect the module with Arduino and example code is included.

It is worth noting that the HC-05 power in (Vcc) uses 5V, while the transmit and receive (TXD and RXD) logic signal uses 3.3V. Accordingly sending signals from the HC-05 module to Arduino is ok as the Arduino I/O pins can safely receive up to 5V but the issue is when Arduino tries to send the data to the HC-05 with signal level 5V, in this case it is required to use a voltage divider as we will see during the tutorial.

Connecting HC-05 Bluetooth Module to Arduino – [Link]

Raspberry Pi 3 on sale at $35

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Raspberry foundation announced the Raspberry Pi 3 at the same price as the previous board. This new board features 1.2GHz 64-bit quad-core ARM Cortex-A53 CPU with ~10x the performance of Raspberry Pi 1, Integrated 802.11n wireless LAN and Bluetooth 4.1 and full compatibility with the previous boards.

For Raspberry Pi 3, Broadcom have supported us with a new SoC, BCM2837. This retains the same basic architecture as its predecessors BCM2835 and BCM2836, so all those projects and tutorials which rely on the precise details of the Raspberry Pi hardware will continue to work.

Raspberry Pi 3 on sale now at $35 – [Link]

MAGIC PIXEL – Bluetooth full color LED display

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MAGIC PIXEL is a full color LED display able to show animations, scrolling texts, and video from a PC or Mac. The display can also be controlled using an Android or iOS device via bluetooth interface.

Magic Pixel is a universal and handy Bluetooth LED display, which we’ve been developing with focus on ease of use and effectivity. It can be used for displaying advertisement, information or just for fun. Magic Pixel is an ideal solution where effective and dynamic visualization of information is required.

MAGIC PIXEL – Bluetooth full color LED display – [Link]

Starling – WiFi enabled LED Display

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Starling is a modular, Open Source LED display with WiFi connectivity. It comes with a mobile app for easy configuration and usage and has hardware support for Bluetooth.

The LED matrix is driven by an Atmega8 microcontroller (MCU), instead of a standard ASIC. This provides a lot of flexibility in the firmware. The firmware detects and assigns IDs to newly plugged-in modules. The microcontroller also stores font tables; hence if ASCII is sent on the serial (UART) port of the MCU, ASCII is what will be displayed on the matrix. Since the firmware detects adjacent displays, it can easily decide if it needs to display static or scrolling text.

Starling – WiFi enabled LED Display – [Link]

Sparkfun: First Impressions of the ESP32

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Jimb0 @ sparkfun.com takes a first look on the new ESP32 WiFi board by Espressif that’s an improvement of the ESP8266 board.

The ESP32 doesn’t replace the ESP8266, but it does improve on it in every aspect. Not only does it have WiFi support, but it also features a Bluetooth 4.2 radio, making it even more versatile. The CPU is similar to the ESP8266 – it’s a 32-bit Xtensa® LX6, but the ESP32 has two cores! There’s also 128KB of ROM and 416KB SRAM, but Flash memory (for program and data storage) is still left up to an external chip (up to 64MB).

Sparkfun: First Impressions of the ESP32 – [Link]

OSHChip – general purpose processor board in DIP format

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OSHChip is a general purpose processor board based on ARM Cortex-M0 32 bit processor running at 16 MHz. It includes 2.4 GHz Bluetooth Low Energy radio and a broad range of built-in Peripherals. It features 256 KBytes of Flash memory for program and data and 32 KBytes of SRAM. All this functionality comes in a tiny DIP like package which is compatible with a breadboard thus making prototyping an easy task. OSHChip is an open source project and all design files are available on github: https://github.com/OSHChip/OSHChip_V1.0_Docs

OSHChip – general purpose processor board in DIP format – [Link]

Fobble – A general purpose Wireless Breakout Board!

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Ken Boak has designed a compact board with RFduino Bluetooth Low Energy Module:

This week I have been working on another of my standard footprint 50mm x 50mm boards – it is a general purpose wireless module carrier board:- Fobble. That’s a BLE Fob – for anyone who misses the pun.

In the last few weeks there have been a number of applications arise – that could easily be addressed with an easy to use, generic wireless platform. These have included keyfob or pendant applications – requiring a small coin cell powered board – to a generic wireless board that can be stacked to one of the processor boards to provide wireless connectivity.

Fobble – A general purpose Wireless Breakout Board! – [Link]

Smart Watch

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Matthew Filipek from Cornell Univercity has build a nice smart watch with 1.7 inch touch screen, SD card, Bluetooth module and various apps.

One of the main inspirations for this project was Jared Sanson’s implementation of a DIY smartwatch (REF 0). With several design iterations, he was able to produce a watch in a very small package that can communicate with a PC via USB HID, features an OLED display, and has support for an accelerometer. As my project was to be completed in the span of a mere month, several of the components I got were purchased for their ease of use rather than their compactness.

Smart Watch – [Link]