Tag Archives: buzzer

Experimenter Prototyping Board for easy circuit build

ExperimentersBoard_6

Raj over embedded-lab.com has build a prototyping board that facilitates the building of simple circuits. It includes a regulated power supply for both 3.3V and 5V, four output LEDs, four input switches, a buzzer, a potentiometer and an onboard breadboard. Using this board you can fast prototype your next project.

Experimenter Prototyping Board for easy circuit build – [Link]

Piezo buzzer Sonitron SMA-13LV deploys maximum from a minimum

obr1600_1

80 dB acoustic signal at only 3V power supply and a really miniature size place this new component into a top class.

Belgian company Sonitron and its top-level products ar probably familiar to you from our articles and from our offer in this segment. We continue in increasing of standard stock types and this time we have here an extraordinary interesting type – SMA-13LV, interesting mainly for low-voltage applications. Series of buzzers marked as “SMA” is known by its variousness, as we find here types with loudness of 75-98 dB, THT and SMT vesions, and versions with a stable, as well as intermittent signal. Various izes from 13 to 30 mm with a pitch of 7.5 to 20.32 mm enable to select the right type for a given application. In general, bigger types provide a more loud signal, but it depends on a concrete type. This series is suitable for general use – everywhere, where a reliable buzzer is necessary, including industrial conditions.

For a succesfull use, it´s only necessary to connect a suitable supply voltage – usually in extremely wide range (for example 1.5-15V). Usually, on the upper end of a supply voltage range we get the highest loudness and at lower voltages we receive a higher lifetime.

Very similar is also the SMAT series (transducers), which in contrast to the SMA series doesn´t contain a driver, that´s why it needs an extenal electronics.

For really tough conditions, the Sonitron SAP. series is suitable. These are buzzers for various usage in traffic, for example as a reverse movement indicator (danger of close approximation). They excell in extreme rigidity, what make them widely used even in avionics, miltary and trucks. SAP series has a specifi usage, that´s why we keep these types as items upúon request.

Another novelties in our standard stock offer can be found below this article. Detailed information can be found in datasheets at particular types and in the new Sonitron 2014 catalogue.

Piezo buzzer Sonitron SMA-13LV deploys maximum from a minimum – [Link]

Arduino Kitchen Timer

anonymouse197 writes:

This instructable will guide you through creating your own Arduino based Kitchen Timer. This is a quite simple project, requiring little or no programming or electronics knowledge, just the willingness to learn and fiddle – an ability most useful for modern man.

This kitchen timer is simple enough, press and hold a button and it will count up it multiples of five minutes, until you release the button. Upon doing so the timer will flash, and begin counting down. This timer includes an alarm and a display, with a piercing piezo buzzer to get your attention.

The arduino, laptop, protoshield, and USB Cable excluded; I took every electrical component from an old or broken device. Try to recycle things, its easy to get hold of broken electronics for free so make the most of it! See any jumpers on this design? No, paper clips are much better – cheap as chips and more sturdy too! :)

Arduino Kitchen Timer – [Link]

Experimenter's I/O board

This articles describes about making a general purpose I/O board that is easy to construct and is very useful for rapid prototyping of microcontroller-based projects. The board basically contains the most frequently used I/O devices and peripherals such as LCD, EEPROM, tact switches, LEDs, buzzer, etc. All the necessary pins of the devices on the board are accessible through female headers that allows easy connection of the board to a breadboard circuit or other development boards using male jumper wires.

Experimenter’s I/O board  – [Link]

Experimenter’s I/O board

This articles describes about making a general purpose I/O board that is easy to construct and is very useful for rapid prototyping of microcontroller-based projects. The board basically contains the most frequently used I/O devices and peripherals such as LCD, EEPROM, tact switches, LEDs, buzzer, etc. All the necessary pins of the devices on the board are accessible through female headers that allows easy connection of the board to a breadboard circuit or other development boards using male jumper wires.

Experimenter’s I/O board  – [Link]

Sailplane Winch Solenoid Safety Buzzer

Miami Mike writes:Recently our club’s winch went out of control and destroyed a glider. The operator took his foot off the pedal but the motor kept running, folding the glider’s wings and slamming it into the ground. Fortunately the winch had a cutoff switch and we were finally able to stop it. It happened because our winch only had one solenoid and the contacts inside had gotten stuck together. We now have two new solenoids wired in series, and I’ve designed a small device to help prevent this sort of thing from happening again. [via]

Sailplane Winch Solenoid Safety Buzzer – [Link]

Rain Detector

This rain detector will give you a heads-up the instant it starts to rain, hopefully giving you time to close windows and bring in possessions. The battery-powered circuit draws virtually no current when the sensor is dry and the current consumption is low when the buzzer is activated so a couple of AA cells will last a long time. Alternately, a molded power supply with a simple voltage regulator to drop the voltage to 3 volts could be used. The circuit is basically a handy flasher circuit that operates well on only 3 volts using ordinary silicon transistors. When the circuit is triggered, the buzzer is pulsed about once per second. [via]

Rain Detector – [Link]